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Psychological Affects of technology, Race & N

AFism
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4/2/2015 7:07:22 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Lately the masses have been overwhelmed by bad news in recent reporting. It seems like a high saturation of unarmed shootings have been surfacing this year. If it isn't Trayvon Martin its Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, Jason Harrison, and Eric garner. It would seem as though some are trapped in a bubble where you are subjected to plane disappearances and crashes murders and killings. And every time a new story comes up you may even get a notification. You can easily access the video of Jason Harrison getting brutally shot, and postponed medical attention of a screw driver on youtube, blood and gore in all. You can access photos of Mike Brown's body that has been laying in the street for 4 hours. You can witness people getting beheaded, stabbed, shot, molested. You may stumble upon the objectification of a woman of color being filmed with out her knowledge doing something you deem disgusting or a stereotypical scene from a t.v. show talking about your race, or an article on a fraternity chanting about racial slurs and lynching or an email surfacing about a frat-boy trying to have sex with all of these women calling them racial slurs. It is all so accessible and the fact that these atrocities can bombard you at any moment in your timeline seems daunting.

Do you think that the hyper-visiblility and accessibility of these articles, these stereotypes, these unsavory videos and images can have an adverse psychological affect on your relationship between a person and their race? Or their overall self image? Have you found any studies that link social media post, accessibility to race and self image?

I think it can but I am seeking others' input.

I have found one study for television and race:

http://sgo.sagepub.com...
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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4/2/2015 9:46:53 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Are you asking if the over-exposure to racial unrest in the news would change my opinion of someone I know of another race?

It would not, because I view people I know as individuals, and individuality is the antithesis of generalizations like stereotypes.
My work here is, finally, done.
AFism
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4/2/2015 10:32:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/2/2015 9:46:53 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
Are you asking if the over-exposure to racial unrest in the news would change my opinion of someone I know of another race?

It would not, because I view people I know as individuals, and individuality is the antithesis of generalizations like stereotypes.

I'm asking do you think that this over exposure has an adverse psychological affect on many people that identify with the race.
briantheliberal
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4/3/2015 3:49:43 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
You are exactly right. And those who cannot relate to this will simply deny it like they do everything else when confronted with issues like this. They do not know what it's like to be a person of color and be mocked, stereotyped, associated with and blame for issues cause by or involving people who just happen to share certain phenotypical characteristics with you. They don't have to deal with these things, and they refuse to see it for what it is, mostly because they don't care. It doesn't affect them personally. But even some people of color fall for this and choose to delude themselves of the fact that they are subjected to the same stigma.

A perfect example of this would be over half of the replies I received on my post about heterosexual privilege, where some people chose to interpret everything I said negatively, as an attack and ridicule me for pointing out certain issues in society in which heterosexuals have an advantage over non-heterosexuals. I even received a reply from someone who claims to be bisexual, and even he couldn't argue effectively against anything I said, and tried to play the semantics game as a last resort.

Personally I am tired of being politically correct and watering down the truth about these issues so I won't hurt people's feelings. These are the same people who look at a prank video on YouTube, see black men being exploited for views, reacting negatively, post forums asking "Why are black people so violent?" and get little to no negative feedback for a blatantly racist and stereotypical post. People even respond to it normally, justify it and take it seriously...

For example: http://www.debate.org...

Meanwhile I am being attacked and ridiculed for pointing out harsh reality that people find "offensive" for no justifiable reason.
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
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4/3/2015 6:17:24 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/3/2015 3:49:43 AM, briantheliberal wrote:
You are exactly right. And those who cannot relate to this will simply deny it like they do everything else when confronted with issues like this. They do not know what it's like to be a person of color and be mocked, stereotyped, associated with and blame for issues cause by or involving people who just happen to share certain phenotypical characteristics with you. They don't have to deal with these things, and they refuse to see it for what it is, mostly because they don't care. It doesn't affect them personally. But even some people of color fall for this and choose to delude themselves of the fact that they are subjected to the same stigma.

A perfect example of this would be over half of the replies I received on my post about heterosexual privilege, where some people chose to interpret everything I said negatively, as an attack and ridicule me for pointing out certain issues in society in which heterosexuals have an advantage over non-heterosexuals. I even received a reply from someone who claims to be bisexual, and even he couldn't argue effectively against anything I said, and tried to play the semantics game as a last resort.

Personally I am tired of being politically correct and watering down the truth about these issues so I won't hurt people's feelings. These are the same people who look at a prank video on YouTube, see black men being exploited for views, reacting negatively, post forums asking "Why are black people so violent?" and get little to no negative feedback for a blatantly racist and stereotypical post. People even respond to it normally, justify it and take it seriously...

For example: http://www.debate.org...

Meanwhile I am being attacked and ridiculed for pointing out harsh reality that people find "offensive" for no justifiable reason.

Actually that post had a lot of negative feedback. For some reason people were not very observant and they took a post entitled "why are black people violent" to mean "why are all black people violent". This mistake was likely made on purpose since the op actually stated not all black people were violent.

It is political correctness that keeps racial tension high, because people can't even point to a truism such as black people have higher rates of violence, without somebody calling them racist.

A lot of people claim the increase is due to socioeconomic factors but there are whites of extremely low socioeconomic status who do not reach the same level of violence as blacks.

It can't have anything to do with white privilege either, because I have proved in a few debates that white privilege does not exist, it is a myth.

The PC police want us to assume black people and white people are exactly the same in every way, except in skin color which is absurd. The presuppositions hold us back from exploring the different cultural influences that different groups face as well as genetic factors. (See increased warrior gene levels that cause more violence in every racial group but is more common among blacks).
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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4/3/2015 8:27:59 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/2/2015 10:32:27 PM, AFism wrote:
At 4/2/2015 9:46:53 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
Are you asking if the over-exposure to racial unrest in the news would change my opinion of someone I know of another race?

It would not, because I view people I know as individuals, and individuality is the antithesis of generalizations like stereotypes.

I'm asking do you think that this over exposure has an adverse psychological affect on many people that identify with the race.

I don't understand the concept of wrapping your identity in one aspect of one's self, like race or sexual orientation.
So, I think those that do do this, are more likely to be adversely affected by this because it "attacks" them at their core. They are told they are bad, and it is reenforced often. They would start believing that others are out to get them, they are violent, or just start getting angry at the depiction and become overly sensitive.

However, if people's self worth and identity are not wrapped in their race, then I don't think it would have much of an effect on them psychologically. These people would acknowledge their race, and realize some people are racist, and some of their race are thugs and morons, and that may have an effect on them (e.g. these rednecks may try something), but not a psychological one.

Do you wrap your identity in your race? Why?
My work here is, finally, done.
AFism
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4/3/2015 10:22:37 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/3/2015 8:27:59 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 4/2/2015 10:32:27 PM, AFism wrote:
At 4/2/2015 9:46:53 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
Are you asking if the over-exposure to racial unrest in the news would change my opinion of someone I know of another race?

It would not, because I view people I know as individuals, and individuality is the antithesis of generalizations like stereotypes.

I'm asking do you think that this over exposure has an adverse psychological affect on many people that identify with the race.

I don't understand the concept of wrapping your identity in one aspect of one's self, like race or sexual orientation.
So, I think those that do do this, are more likely to be adversely affected by this because it "attacks" them at their core. They are told they are bad, and it is reenforced often. They would start believing that others are out to get them, they are violent, or just start getting angry at the depiction and become overly sensitive.

However, if people's self worth and identity are not wrapped in their race, then I don't think it would have much of an effect on them psychologically. These people would acknowledge their race, and realize some people are racist, and some of their race are thugs and morons, and that may have an effect on them (e.g. these rednecks may try something), but not a psychological one.

Do you wrap your identity in your race? Why?

I think it would be hard for minorities to detach their race from their identity because their race is so stigmatized and many identify them by their race first, because they aren't the "norm". Even if they choose to not let their race define them, it is evident that they are constantly being defined by their race; hence the overwhelming images point that i brought up. So to say someone is being overly sensitive to this phenomena is kind of... dense don't you think? Seeming as though there can be a feeling that you can't escape the images constantly being imposed through the media.

I do see where you are coming from though. I feel that the ones that aren't psychologically affected have a form of cognitive dissonance from the phenomena.

I dont "wrap" my identity in my race although race does play a part in my identity as my race heavily influences my perspective and experiences. I don't let race define me but I am cognizant that there are very real consequences and advantages that are attached to my perceived race and that people may choose to define me by my race first.

What about you?
Khaos_Mage
Posts: 23,214
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4/3/2015 10:46:39 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/3/2015 10:22:37 AM, AFism wrote:
At 4/3/2015 8:27:59 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 4/2/2015 10:32:27 PM, AFism wrote:
At 4/2/2015 9:46:53 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
Are you asking if the over-exposure to racial unrest in the news would change my opinion of someone I know of another race?

It would not, because I view people I know as individuals, and individuality is the antithesis of generalizations like stereotypes.

I'm asking do you think that this over exposure has an adverse psychological affect on many people that identify with the race.

I don't understand the concept of wrapping your identity in one aspect of one's self, like race or sexual orientation.
So, I think those that do do this, are more likely to be adversely affected by this because it "attacks" them at their core. They are told they are bad, and it is reenforced often. They would start believing that others are out to get them, they are violent, or just start getting angry at the depiction and become overly sensitive.

However, if people's self worth and identity are not wrapped in their race, then I don't think it would have much of an effect on them psychologically. These people would acknowledge their race, and realize some people are racist, and some of their race are thugs and morons, and that may have an effect on them (e.g. these rednecks may try something), but not a psychological one.

Do you wrap your identity in your race? Why?

I think it would be hard for minorities to detach their race from their identity because their race is so stigmatized and many identify them by their race first, because they aren't the "norm". Even if they choose to not let their race define them, it is evident that they are constantly being defined by their race; hence the overwhelming images point that i brought up. So to say someone is being overly sensitive to this phenomena is kind of... dense don't you think? Seeming as though there can be a feeling that you can't escape the images constantly being imposed through the media.

I do see where you are coming from though. I feel that the ones that aren't psychologically affected have a form of cognitive dissonance from the phenomena.

I dont "wrap" my identity in my race although race does play a part in my identity as my race heavily influences my perspective and experiences. I don't let race define me but I am cognizant that there are very real consequences and advantages that are attached to my perceived race and that people may choose to define me by my race first.
It seems you can say my thoughts better than me LOL
I do not expect minorities to be able to ignore their (or any other's) race as it is the first thing people usually notice about people, and thus, the first prejudice to overcome. (for better or worse)
But, it seems that some will say "I am black", like that defines them, which I find quite ironic, since it implies race defines characteristics. This is different than saying "I am an individual who happens to be black", and recognizing that their race will proceed their other qualities.
Whites (or Americans in general) often do this in another way. They define themselves through their jobs. And, when you attack a job (lawyers as thieves, pizza drivers as drug users) people get offended as well, as they take it personally.
It seems humans (or Americans) like to swap humanity and individualism for groups and labels.

What about you?
Well, of the minorities that I belong, I don't view myself as member of a group. However, outside of wearing glasses, none of my minority statuses are obvious at a glance, unlike race, and I do not think of myself as white (except for the stereotypes that apply to me), unless I feel my race is an issue. I've known members of other races that think the same way, and I've known other members of races that use race to identify them, even whites.

Did I answer your question? I don't feel like I did.
My work here is, finally, done.
AFism
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4/3/2015 10:48:18 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/3/2015 6:17:24 AM, Wylted wrote:
At 4/3/2015 3:49:43 AM, briantheliberal wrote:
You are exactly right. And those who cannot relate to this will simply deny it like they do everything else when confronted with issues like this. They do not know what it's like to be a person of color and be mocked, stereotyped, associated with and blame for issues cause by or involving people who just happen to share certain phenotypical characteristics with you. They don't have to deal with these things, and they refuse to see it for what it is, mostly because they don't care. It doesn't affect them personally. But even some people of color fall for this and choose to delude themselves of the fact that they are subjected to the same stigma.

A perfect example of this would be over half of the replies I received on my post about heterosexual privilege, where some people chose to interpret everything I said negatively, as an attack and ridicule me for pointing out certain issues in society in which heterosexuals have an advantage over non-heterosexuals. I even received a reply from someone who claims to be bisexual, and even he couldn't argue effectively against anything I said, and tried to play the semantics game as a last resort.

Personally I am tired of being politically correct and watering down the truth about these issues so I won't hurt people's feelings. These are the same people who look at a prank video on YouTube, see black men being exploited for views, reacting negatively, post forums asking "Why are black people so violent?" and get little to no negative feedback for a blatantly racist and stereotypical post. People even respond to it normally, justify it and take it seriously...

For example: http://www.debate.org...

Meanwhile I am being attacked and ridiculed for pointing out harsh reality that people find "offensive" for no justifiable reason.

Actually that post had a lot of negative feedback. For some reason people were not very observant and they took a post entitled "why are black people violent" to mean "why are all black people violent". This mistake was likely made on purpose since the op actually stated not all black people were violent.

It is political correctness that keeps racial tension high, because people can't even point to a truism such as black people have higher rates of violence, without somebody calling them racist.

: A lot of people claim the increase is due to socioeconomic factors but there are whites of extremely low socioeconomic status who do not reach the same level of violence as blacks.

This post was eluding to the fact that maybe the media and technology plays a very real and integrative part in this psychologically for any race. There have been studies conducted that people tend to imitate the t.v. characters that they identify with, and there has been studies that showed that black people spend more hours in front of the t.v. on average, specifically black children. Could it be that these overwhelming images contribute to these higher rates of violence? You see all of these black males being portrayed as gangsters, thugs, players etc. All of these headlines talking about unarmed black men being shot, fight videos posted of black people fighting and killing one another, black women being portrayed as exotic, promiscuous, easy and stupid, all in the media? Couldn't the logic of some be, well since people view me as this way, I may as well fulfill this mold, or since people view me this way i will try to fill the impossible mold of a perceived normal american, or since people view me this way forget it I'm going to retaliate against the system?

It can't have anything to do with white privilege either, because I have proved in a few debates that white privilege does not exist, it is a myth.

Very interesting that you brought this up. Give me a link to the debate? Very interested in reading it. I can't see why you brought this up in this post though, seeming as I'm trying at insight discussion on the "hypothetical" psychological influences of media on different racial and ethnic groups. Where do you think the "myth" of white privilege fits in? Or do you think that there is no place to address this perceived myth that you speak of in this topic?

The PC police want us to assume black people and white people are exactly the same in every way, except in skin color which is absurd

Ah, now I se the crux of your argument. Are you saying that there are biological differences? or Behavioral ones? I just assume that every one is human regardless of race while acknowledging the affects of race on peoples identity and perception of time and space as well as their interaction with time and spaces.

. The presuppositions hold us back from exploring the different cultural influences that different groups face as well as genetic factors. (See increased warrior gene levels that cause more violence in every racial group but is more common among blacks).

Ah you believe in the Warrior gene phenomena! Ah this explains a lot! I'll research this more before I address it properly. I thought Zarroette said that it wasn't found in black people as much in her exegesis?
AFism
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4/3/2015 10:52:52 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/3/2015 10:46:39 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 4/3/2015 10:22:37 AM, AFism wrote:
At 4/3/2015 8:27:59 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 4/2/2015 10:32:27 PM, AFism wrote:
At 4/2/2015 9:46:53 PM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
Are you asking if the over-exposure to racial unrest in the news would change my opinion of someone I know of another race?

It would not, because I view people I know as individuals, and individuality is the antithesis of generalizations like stereotypes.

I'm asking do you think that this over exposure has an adverse psychological affect on many people that identify with the race.

I don't understand the concept of wrapping your identity in one aspect of one's self, like race or sexual orientation.
So, I think those that do do this, are more likely to be adversely affected by this because it "attacks" them at their core. They are told they are bad, and it is reenforced often. They would start believing that others are out to get them, they are violent, or just start getting angry at the depiction and become overly sensitive.

However, if people's self worth and identity are not wrapped in their race, then I don't think it would have much of an effect on them psychologically. These people would acknowledge their race, and realize some people are racist, and some of their race are thugs and morons, and that may have an effect on them (e.g. these rednecks may try something), but not a psychological one.

Do you wrap your identity in your race? Why?

I think it would be hard for minorities to detach their race from their identity because their race is so stigmatized and many identify them by their race first, because they aren't the "norm". Even if they choose to not let their race define them, it is evident that they are constantly being defined by their race; hence the overwhelming images point that i brought up. So to say someone is being overly sensitive to this phenomena is kind of... dense don't you think? Seeming as though there can be a feeling that you can't escape the images constantly being imposed through the media.

I do see where you are coming from though. I feel that the ones that aren't psychologically affected have a form of cognitive dissonance from the phenomena.

I dont "wrap" my identity in my race although race does play a part in my identity as my race heavily influences my perspective and experiences. I don't let race define me but I am cognizant that there are very real consequences and advantages that are attached to my perceived race and that people may choose to define me by my race first.

: It seems you can say my thoughts better than me LOL
I do not expect minorities to be able to ignore their (or any other's) race as it is the first thing people usually notice about people, and thus, the first prejudice to overcome. (for better or worse)

Haha I see!

But, it seems that some will say "I am black", like that defines them, which I find quite ironic, since it implies race defines characteristics. This is different than saying "I am an individual who happens to be black", and recognizing that their race will proceed their other qualities.

I find this humorous. I don't think anyone who is black has to proclaim their blackness in such a way when meeting people. Not unless they are racially ambiguous, and that is a whole new debate lol!

Whites (or Americans in general) often do this in another way. They define themselves through their jobs. And, when you attack a job (lawyers as thieves, pizza drivers as drug users) people get offended as well, as they take it personally.

I feel this is true, then the whole classism thing comes into play.

It seems humans (or Americans) like to swap humanity and individualism for groups and labels.

What about you?
Well, of the minorities that I belong, I don't view myself as member of a group. However, outside of wearing glasses, none of my minority statuses are obvious at a glance, unlike race, and I do not think of myself as white (except for the stereotypes that apply to me), unless I feel my race is an issue. I've known members of other races that think the same way, and I've known other members of races that use race to identify them, even whites.

Did I answer your question? I don't feel like I did.

No thats a valuable answer thanks for your input!
AFism
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4/3/2015 11:06:11 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/3/2015 3:49:43 AM, briantheliberal wrote:
You are exactly right. And those who cannot relate to this will simply deny it like they do everything else when confronted with issues like this. They do not know what it's like to be a person of color and be mocked, stereotyped, associated with and blame for issues cause by or involving people who just happen to share certain phenotypical characteristics with you. They don't have to deal with these things, and they refuse to see it for what it is, mostly because they don't care. It doesn't affect them personally. But even some people of color fall for this and choose to delude themselves of the fact that they are subjected to the same stigma.

A perfect example of this would be over half of the replies I received on my post about heterosexual privilege, where some people chose to interpret everything I said negatively, as an attack and ridicule me for pointing out certain issues in society in which heterosexuals have an advantage over non-heterosexuals. I even received a reply from someone who claims to be bisexual, and even he couldn't argue effectively against anything I said, and tried to play the semantics game as a last resort.

Personally I am tired of being politically correct and watering down the truth about these issues so I won't hurt people's feelings. These are the same people who look at a prank video on YouTube, see black men being exploited for views, reacting negatively, post forums asking "Why are black people so violent?" and get little to no negative feedback for a blatantly racist and stereotypical post. People even respond to it normally, justify it and take it seriously...

For example: http://www.debate.org...

Meanwhile I am being attacked and ridiculed for pointing out harsh reality that people find "offensive" for no justifiable reason.

I realized that this phenomena may be one of the causes of what you were addressing, hence I created this post. I am glad that you agree.
Khaos_Mage
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4/3/2015 11:10:34 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/3/2015 10:52:52 AM, AFism wrote:

But, it seems that some will say "I am black", like that defines them, which I find quite ironic, since it implies race defines characteristics. This is different than saying "I am an individual who happens to be black", and recognizing that their race will proceed their other qualities.

I find this humorous. I don't think anyone who is black has to proclaim their blackness in such a way when meeting people. Not unless they are racially ambiguous, and that is a whole new debate lol!

I mean say to themselves, metaphorically. Not literally introducing themselves. This is what I mean by wrapping themselves in their race. Maybe a better way to say this is identifying themselves by their race, and nothing else.


No thats a valuable answer thanks for your input!

Good. I'm glad I didn't miss the point twice in one thread.
My work here is, finally, done.
AFism
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4/3/2015 11:15:40 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/3/2015 11:10:34 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 4/3/2015 10:52:52 AM, AFism wrote:

But, it seems that some will say "I am black", like that defines them, which I find quite ironic, since it implies race defines characteristics. This is different than saying "I am an individual who happens to be black", and recognizing that their race will proceed their other qualities.

I find this humorous. I don't think anyone who is black has to proclaim their blackness in such a way when meeting people. Not unless they are racially ambiguous, and that is a whole new debate lol!

I mean say to themselves, metaphorically. Not literally introducing themselves. This is what I mean by wrapping themselves in their race. Maybe a better way to say this is identifying themselves by their race, and nothing else.

Did you see my post addressing this?


No thats a valuable answer thanks for your input!

Good. I'm glad I didn't miss the point twice in one thread.
Khaos_Mage
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4/3/2015 11:27:00 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/3/2015 11:15:40 AM, AFism wrote:
At 4/3/2015 11:10:34 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 4/3/2015 10:52:52 AM, AFism wrote:

But, it seems that some will say "I am black", like that defines them, which I find quite ironic, since it implies race defines characteristics. This is different than saying "I am an individual who happens to be black", and recognizing that their race will proceed their other qualities.

I find this humorous. I don't think anyone who is black has to proclaim their blackness in such a way when meeting people. Not unless they are racially ambiguous, and that is a whole new debate lol!

I mean say to themselves, metaphorically. Not literally introducing themselves. This is what I mean by wrapping themselves in their race. Maybe a better way to say this is identifying themselves by their race, and nothing else.

Did you see my post addressing this?

I think so, but I think I am not explaining the distinction I am trying to make very well.
I'll just stop now.
My work here is, finally, done.
AFism
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4/3/2015 11:41:05 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/3/2015 11:27:00 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 4/3/2015 11:15:40 AM, AFism wrote:
At 4/3/2015 11:10:34 AM, Khaos_Mage wrote:
At 4/3/2015 10:52:52 AM, AFism wrote:

But, it seems that some will say "I am black", like that defines them, which I find quite ironic, since it implies race defines characteristics. This is different than saying "I am an individual who happens to be black", and recognizing that their race will proceed their other qualities.

I find this humorous. I don't think anyone who is black has to proclaim their blackness in such a way when meeting people. Not unless they are racially ambiguous, and that is a whole new debate lol!

I mean say to themselves, metaphorically. Not literally introducing themselves. This is what I mean by wrapping themselves in their race. Maybe a better way to say this is identifying themselves by their race, and nothing else.

Did you see my post addressing this?

I think so, but I think I am not explaining the distinction I am trying to make very well.
I'll just stop now.

I think you are trying to address how race shapes and doesn't shape a persons' perceived reality. It is weird because race is socially constructed, it is hypothetically non-existent, yet it affects or doesn't your everyday life based on the environment you are in. It is assumed that you have no way to disassociate yourself from your race due to the fact that race is inherently a integral part of society, specifically American society. Yet there have been black people who have been raised "white" and who didn't know they were "black". And vice versa. Race, as a tool for social identification, causes these blurred lines and defies binary thinking. For instance there would be someone who maybe didn't look black, but has a parents that are "black", but didn't like things that you would think a black person would like. That begs the question then what constitutes a race? Is is strictly biology or is it also cultural? I have a problem when people say that it is strictly biology because of the rampant race mixing that has been going on for over 400 years in America. So (this is at you Wylted :)) I just find it hard to believe that black people have this gene more than any other race, when White people have mixed through out all of the perceived races, and may have more "black" in them then they think. It seems that unfortunately today race is identified Phenotypically rather then, you take a genetics test and see what percentage you are. To say it bluntly, you look white you're white, you look black, you're black, you can't determine the race you're "mixed". This is all of course based on when you first meet a person though.

Hope I didn't info dump...