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Racist masquerading as pro-diversity advocate

F-16_Fighting_Falcon
Posts: 18,324
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4/4/2015 8:41:52 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
http://www.diversityinc.com...

LOL. If he's so interested in being considered someone who isn't a racist, he should recognize that people want to be treated equally. It is common among racists to think that because they respect some other culture, they are not being racists. And they wear it like a badge of honor. They don't realize that if you are truly inclusive and not racist, you would treat all people equally. You would treat people of different races just as you would treat people of your own race, not with some special "respect."

Another article: http://www.diversityinc.com...
briantheliberal
Posts: 722
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4/4/2015 8:53:36 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
This doesn't surprise me. A lot of racists act as if they aren't racist because they consider themselves "inclusive" or "pro-diversity" just like this guy https://www.youtube.com...
Chi_chillix
Posts: 5
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5/7/2015 11:45:36 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Not being 'racist' is to not see race in anything at all. As such we are all in some way 'racist' because we all reduce aspects of reality to 'race'. Whenever we racialise something, ie, identify race as relevant, we are reduced to racism. By this definition even the concept of "black" and "white" is racist. Both of these categories are socially constructed labels and therefore they both have huge limitations.

What defines someone as black? Skin colour? African ancestry perhaps? Well if the first is true then are Sri Lakans black? If the second is true then aren't we all Black? What about someone with just one parent supposedly of African ancestry? Why do we call people of mixed heritage black? President Obama for example? Thinking of blackness in terms of the "one drop" rule, ie if you have "one drop" of 'black' it makes you black is actually racist. It's as if the so called black side stains and even taints the purity of the white side. And what does white mean anyway? Are Turks white? If no why not and if yes why so? What about a person who appears to be white but has a bi racial parent?

You see, the point is there is nothing real about race but merely a few similarities which foster a sense of collectivity which in turn contributes to a common history from which forms a common identity. So being black or white is merely having a sense of something. Children don't know if they are black or white, they learn it. They learn to have a sense of what being black or white means. The term black was invented around the beginning of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, before then we had no concept of it.

The point is that whilst we live in a world which expects us to create a sense of being black or white, we will continue to be inherently racist. When we live in a raceless society, where we do not see race (racialise) society at all, we will find no need for the labels black or white. We will all truly be free of being racist. Most people call people racist when they fit on the more extrem side of the racist spectrum, but we all fit on it, somewhere.
We are the result of what we have thought
F-16_Fighting_Falcon
Posts: 18,324
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5/11/2015 12:42:00 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/7/2015 11:45:36 PM, Chi_chillix wrote:
Not being 'racist' is to not see race in anything at all. As such we are all in some way 'racist' because we all reduce aspects of reality to 'race'. Whenever we racialise something, ie, identify race as relevant, we are reduced to racism. By this definition even the concept of "black" and "white" is racist. Both of these categories are socially constructed labels and therefore they both have huge limitations.

What defines someone as black? Skin colour? African ancestry perhaps? Well if the first is true then are Sri Lakans black? If the second is true then aren't we all Black? What about someone with just one parent supposedly of African ancestry? Why do we call people of mixed heritage black? President Obama for example? Thinking of blackness in terms of the "one drop" rule, ie if you have "one drop" of 'black' it makes you black is actually racist. It's as if the so called black side stains and even taints the purity of the white side. And what does white mean anyway? Are Turks white? If no why not and if yes why so? What about a person who appears to be white but has a bi racial parent?

You see, the point is there is nothing real about race but merely a few similarities which foster a sense of collectivity which in turn contributes to a common history from which forms a common identity. So being black or white is merely having a sense of something. Children don't know if they are black or white, they learn it. They learn to have a sense of what being black or white means. The term black was invented around the beginning of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, before then we had no concept of it.

The point is that whilst we live in a world which expects us to create a sense of being black or white, we will continue to be inherently racist. When we live in a raceless society, where we do not see race (racialise) society at all, we will find no need for the labels black or white. We will all truly be free of being racist. Most people call people racist when they fit on the more extrem side of the racist spectrum, but we all fit on it, somewhere.

Very true. I think the ideal is a raceless society but we are quite a bit away from there. We have morphed from a racist world to a world where explicit racism is taboo which is a massive improvement. I hope it continues to a place where race does not matter.
philochristos
Posts: 2,614
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5/11/2015 4:30:35 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
If somebody is trying not to be racist by over-compensating, then I don't think we should put up a stink about them being racist. They're at least trying not to be. They at least recognize it as a flaw that they don't want to have.
"Not to know of what things one should demand demonstration, and of what one should not, argues want of education." ~Aristotle

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." ~Aristotle
F-16_Fighting_Falcon
Posts: 18,324
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5/12/2015 2:50:47 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/11/2015 4:30:35 PM, philochristos wrote:
If somebody is trying not to be racist by over-compensating, then I don't think we should put up a stink about them being racist. They're at least trying not to be. They at least recognize it as a flaw that they don't want to have.

It is true that unintentional racism is less malicious than intentional racism. It is still racism regardless of whether the speaker intends it to be racist.
Fly
Posts: 2,049
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5/12/2015 11:58:07 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 2:50:47 AM, F-16_Fighting_Falcon wrote:
At 5/11/2015 4:30:35 PM, philochristos wrote:
If somebody is trying not to be racist by over-compensating, then I don't think we should put up a stink about them being racist. They're at least trying not to be. They at least recognize it as a flaw that they don't want to have.

It is true that unintentional racism is less malicious than intentional racism. It is still racism regardless of whether the speaker intends it to be racist.

I'm not sure what your issue is here-- there is a big difference between being unintentionally racist (that's most people) and intentionally putting in effort to avoid being racist, as this "white guy" is doing.

I suggest doing a search on the concept "colorblindness contributes to racism."
"You don't have a right to be a jerk."
--Religion Forum's hypocrite extraordinaire serving up lulz
F-16_Fighting_Falcon
Posts: 18,324
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5/12/2015 2:12:37 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 11:58:07 AM, Fly wrote:
I'm not sure what your issue is here-- there is a big difference between being unintentionally racist (that's most people) and intentionally putting in effort to avoid being racist, as this "white guy" is doing.

In his attempts to do the latter, he is also doing the former.

I suggest doing a search on the concept "colorblindness contributes to racism."

I did. This site [http://everydayfeminism.com...] was one of the first results.

I don't advocate trying to pretend that racism doesn't exist or that we shouldn't talk about it. I only suggest that people treat everyone of all racial/ethnic groups equally without regard to their race. My point is that eliminating racism starts with equal treatment, not with special treatment to each race. Also, the entire article is written from a "white-american" point of view affording special treatment to whites. That's an example of unintentional racism. Phraseology like "True progress will come when White Americans no longer feel threatened by the racial identities of groups of color" as opposed to the more neutral, non-racist "True progress will come when people no longer feel threatened by the racial identities of people of other races." One of the more interesting things about racism is that some people who put in effort to avoid racism often unintentionally wind up being racist because racism runs so deep that in their efforts to avoid superficial racism, they don't see the deeper issues.
1Percenter
Posts: 782
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5/12/2015 4:58:54 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 2:12:37 PM, F-16_Fighting_Falcon wrote:
At 5/12/2015 11:58:07 AM, Fly wrote:
I'm not sure what your issue is here-- there is a big difference between being unintentionally racist (that's most people) and intentionally putting in effort to avoid being racist, as this "white guy" is doing.

In his attempts to do the latter, he is also doing the former.

I suggest doing a search on the concept "colorblindness contributes to racism."

I did. This site [http://everydayfeminism.com...] was one of the first results.

I don't advocate trying to pretend that racism doesn't exist or that we shouldn't talk about it. I only suggest that people treat everyone of all racial/ethnic groups equally without regard to their race. My point is that eliminating racism starts with equal treatment, not with special treatment to each race. Also, the entire article is written from a "white-american" point of view affording special treatment to whites. That's an example of unintentional racism. Phraseology like "True progress will come when White Americans no longer feel threatened by the racial identities of groups of color" as opposed to the more neutral, non-racist "True progress will come when people no longer feel threatened by the racial identities of people of other races." One of the more interesting things about racism is that some people who put in effort to avoid racism often unintentionally wind up being racist because racism runs so deep that in their efforts to avoid superficial racism, they don't see the deeper issues.

It amuses me to watch all these self-proclaimed "anti-racists" constantly patting their own backs for identifying the racist undertones in everything everyone else says. The fact remains that anti-racism is anti-reality and any efforts to enforce racial equality work in direct opposition to genetic science and observable reality. If the progressive, equality-driven anti-racists can't even rid racial biases from their own ranks, how can they possibly expect it from the rest of society?
F-16_Fighting_Falcon
Posts: 18,324
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5/12/2015 5:05:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 4:58:54 PM, 1Percenter wrote:
It amuses me to watch all these self-proclaimed "anti-racists" constantly patting their own backs for identifying the racist undertones in everything everyone else says. The fact remains that anti-racism is anti-reality and any efforts to enforce racial equality work in direct opposition to genetic science and observable reality. If the progressive, equality-driven anti-racists can't even rid racial biases from their own ranks, how can they possibly expect it from the rest of society?

That's not true. It is not about "enforcing" equality. Eliminating racism is about not caring about a person's race at all.
Fly
Posts: 2,049
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5/12/2015 7:23:36 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 5/12/2015 2:12:37 PM, F-16_Fighting_Falcon wrote:
At 5/12/2015 11:58:07 AM, Fly wrote:
I'm not sure what your issue is here-- there is a big difference between being unintentionally racist (that's most people) and intentionally putting in effort to avoid being racist, as this "white guy" is doing.

In his attempts to do the latter, he is also doing the former.

I suggest doing a search on the concept "colorblindness contributes to racism."

I did. This site [http://everydayfeminism.com...] was one of the first results.

I don't advocate trying to pretend that racism doesn't exist or that we shouldn't talk about it. I only suggest that people treat everyone of all racial/ethnic groups equally without regard to their race. My point is that eliminating racism starts with equal treatment, not with special treatment to each race. Also, the entire article is written from a "white-american" point of view affording special treatment to whites. That's an example of unintentional racism. Phraseology like "True progress will come when White Americans no longer feel threatened by the racial identities of groups of color" as opposed to the more neutral, non-racist "True progress will come when people no longer feel threatened by the racial identities of people of other races." One of the more interesting things about racism is that some people who put in effort to avoid racism often unintentionally wind up being racist because racism runs so deep that in their efforts to avoid superficial racism, they don't see the deeper issues.

Interesting angle. I will take that into consideration in the future.

I was just afraid that you might be espousing the view that recognizing someone as black is a bad thing-- which subcommunicates that being black is a bad thing. But I see that you have not fallen prey to that view.
"You don't have a right to be a jerk."
--Religion Forum's hypocrite extraordinaire serving up lulz