Total Posts:58|Showing Posts:1-30|Last Page
Jump to topic:

Why is saying "I'm colorblind" a bad thing?

PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/7/2015 11:00:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I've seen many people who I know that say something along the lines of "I'm colorblind - I don't see race" and just as many people (online, that is) who find that statement offensive, racist, or ignorant. But despite the reasons people provide, I don't see how this phrase is bad.

When people say "I'm colorblind," they obviously don't mean literally colorblind (that is, in the context of discussions about race and racism). Instead, they mean that they see all people as human beings (not Black, White, Vietnamese, Persian, etc.) and that they necessarily don't discriminate against one race over others, since they see people as humans and not as a race. Why is this bad?

Some people say it's bad because it means you're ignoring racism. It is said that if you can't see color, then you can't see that people are being discriminated against on the basis of color. Except that's not what the phrase "I"m colorblind" means. It doesn't mean you literally cannot see color and you can't see that certain minority groups are being discriminated against more than the majority. It just means that you treat other races as equally as you can and don't discriminate against one more than another. Again, this isn't bad.

Others argue that it means you're ignoring someone's cultural/ethnic heritage, but since when did treating people equally mean you ignore someone's heritage? Even if you were literally colorblind and literally could not distinguish between black and white people, how does this mean you're ignoring ethnic heritage? What is the difference between race and ethnicity, exactly? Is the color of your skin the sum of your heritage and your entire culture? It doesn't make sense to me.

So if anyone could please kindly explain to me if I have misunderstood something and why people find this phrase offensive, I would gladly appreciate it. Thanks.
lamerde
Posts: 1,416
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/7/2015 11:23:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
The short of it is that when people say the don't see colour, what they really mean is that they see you as "white", as though people of colour aspire to be white. Colourblind ideology is also often used to invalidate or erase the experiences of racialized people. Colourblind ideology is an example of a well-meaning belief system that just doesn't work in practice.
Why I ignore YYW:
http://www.debate.org...
http://www.debate.org...
Calling someone a bitch multiple times while claiming you're taking the high road is an art form, I suppose: http://www.debate.org...
Fly
Posts: 2,043
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 12:58:08 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/7/2015 11:00:27 PM, PeacefulChaos wrote:
I've seen many people who I know that say something along the lines of "I'm colorblind - I don't see race" and just as many people (online, that is) who find that statement offensive, racist, or ignorant. But despite the reasons people provide, I don't see how this phrase is bad.

When people say "I'm colorblind," they obviously don't mean literally colorblind (that is, in the context of discussions about race and racism). Instead, they mean that they see all people as human beings (not Black, White, Vietnamese, Persian, etc.) and that they necessarily don't discriminate against one race over others, since they see people as humans and not as a race. Why is this bad?

Some people say it's bad because it means you're ignoring racism. It is said that if you can't see color, then you can't see that people are being discriminated against on the basis of color. Except that's not what the phrase "I"m colorblind" means. It doesn't mean you literally cannot see color and you can't see that certain minority groups are being discriminated against more than the majority. It just means that you treat other races as equally as you can and don't discriminate against one more than another. Again, this isn't bad.

Others argue that it means you're ignoring someone's cultural/ethnic heritage, but since when did treating people equally mean you ignore someone's heritage? Even if you were literally colorblind and literally could not distinguish between black and white people, how does this mean you're ignoring ethnic heritage? What is the difference between race and ethnicity, exactly? Is the color of your skin the sum of your heritage and your entire culture? It doesn't make sense to me.

So if anyone could please kindly explain to me if I have misunderstood something and why people find this phrase offensive, I would gladly appreciate it. Thanks.

Here's a question-- do you know any people of color who claim to be colorblind?
"You don't have a right to be a jerk."
--Religion Forum's hypocrite extraordinaire serving up lulz
FaustianJustice
Posts: 6,205
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 4:43:52 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/7/2015 11:00:27 PM, PeacefulChaos wrote:
I've seen many people who I know that say something along the lines of "I'm colorblind - I don't see race" and just as many people (online, that is) who find that statement offensive, racist, or ignorant. But despite the reasons people provide, I don't see how this phrase is bad.

When people say "I'm colorblind," they obviously don't mean literally colorblind (that is, in the context of discussions about race and racism). Instead, they mean that they see all people as human beings (not Black, White, Vietnamese, Persian, etc.) and that they necessarily don't discriminate against one race over others, since they see people as humans and not as a race. Why is this bad?

Some people say it's bad because it means you're ignoring racism. It is said that if you can't see color, then you can't see that people are being discriminated against on the basis of color. Except that's not what the phrase "I"m colorblind" means. It doesn't mean you literally cannot see color and you can't see that certain minority groups are being discriminated against more than the majority. It just means that you treat other races as equally as you can and don't discriminate against one more than another. Again, this isn't bad.

Others argue that it means you're ignoring someone's cultural/ethnic heritage, but since when did treating people equally mean you ignore someone's heritage? Even if you were literally colorblind and literally could not distinguish between black and white people, how does this mean you're ignoring ethnic heritage? What is the difference between race and ethnicity, exactly? Is the color of your skin the sum of your heritage and your entire culture? It doesn't make sense to me.

So if anyone could please kindly explain to me if I have misunderstood something and why people find this phrase offensive, I would gladly appreciate it. Thanks.

Dude, I had no idea what that would be a bad thing, till I read your post, then realized what you were referring to. I don't think its a bad thing to say, if its true. Though, I don't generally think people whom state that are genuinely ignorant of color.
Here we have an advocate for Islamic arranged marriages demonstrating that children can consent to sex.
http://www.debate.org...
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 8:27:35 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 12:58:08 AM, Fly wrote:
At 6/7/2015 11:00:27 PM, PeacefulChaos wrote:
I've seen many people who I know that say something along the lines of "I'm colorblind - I don't see race" and just as many people (online, that is) who find that statement offensive, racist, or ignorant. But despite the reasons people provide, I don't see how this phrase is bad.

When people say "I'm colorblind," they obviously don't mean literally colorblind (that is, in the context of discussions about race and racism). Instead, they mean that they see all people as human beings (not Black, White, Vietnamese, Persian, etc.) and that they necessarily don't discriminate against one race over others, since they see people as humans and not as a race. Why is this bad?

Some people say it's bad because it means you're ignoring racism. It is said that if you can't see color, then you can't see that people are being discriminated against on the basis of color. Except that's not what the phrase "I"m colorblind" means. It doesn't mean you literally cannot see color and you can't see that certain minority groups are being discriminated against more than the majority. It just means that you treat other races as equally as you can and don't discriminate against one more than another. Again, this isn't bad.

Others argue that it means you're ignoring someone's cultural/ethnic heritage, but since when did treating people equally mean you ignore someone's heritage? Even if you were literally colorblind and literally could not distinguish between black and white people, how does this mean you're ignoring ethnic heritage? What is the difference between race and ethnicity, exactly? Is the color of your skin the sum of your heritage and your entire culture? It doesn't make sense to me.

So if anyone could please kindly explain to me if I have misunderstood something and why people find this phrase offensive, I would gladly appreciate it. Thanks.

Here's a question-- do you know any people of color who claim to be colorblind?

There is so many ways to take that. My first inclination is to say, just because they're racist doesn't mean I have to be. So basically your sentence will likely be taken like that unless elaborated on. I know what you mean, but the op probably doesn't
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 8:34:56 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
The theory is that you're discounting the unique experiences of different ethnicities by being colorblind.

Say for example your cellphone starts acting out and you look around and see an Asian, a white, a black, a Jew, an Indian, an Arab and let's throw in a mixed person. If you just go to random people without taking into account their unique cultural experiences, you might accidently go to the Asian person last and by that time they may be gone and your cellphone will never be fixed.

However if you look at their unique cultural experiences than you'll immediately ask the asain to fix your phone and you'll have your phone fixed. You may want to ask another race to fix your phone first just so you don't come across as racist by immediately going to the asain, but ultimately it doesn't matter too much.

However if you do go to another race before asking the asain, I reccomend avoiding the black guy, he'll steal your phone. Also avoid the Jew, he'll charge you too much to fix the phone.
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 9:59:00 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 8:34:56 AM, Wylted wrote:

However if you do go to another race before asking the asain, I reccomend avoiding the black guy, he'll steal your phone. Also avoid the Jew, he'll charge you too much to fix the phone.

lol

Good points Wylted, good points
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 10:02:00 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 9:59:00 AM, PeacefulChaos wrote:
At 6/8/2015 8:34:56 AM, Wylted wrote:

However if you do go to another race before asking the asain, I reccomend avoiding the black guy, he'll steal your phone. Also avoid the Jew, he'll charge you too much to fix the phone.

lol

Good points Wylted, good points

Yeah, I'm racially sensitive now.
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 10:02:41 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 12:58:08 AM, Fly wrote:

Here's a question-- do you know any people of color who claim to be colorblind?

I don't know if this is what you consider "people of color," but my mother who is from Iran claims the same thing. So do some other Persians in the community I live in. I also know a family from Brazil who agrees with this sentiment. There are probably hundreds of millions of different races or ethnicities out there that would agree with this idea.

Why do you ask?
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 10:05:04 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/7/2015 11:23:30 PM, lamerde wrote:
The short of it is that when people say the don't see colour, what they really mean is that they see you as "white", as though people of colour aspire to be white. Colourblind ideology is also often used to invalidate or erase the experiences of racialized people. Colourblind ideology is an example of a well-meaning belief system that just doesn't work in practice.

If that is what people mean when they say such a phrase, I would agree that it is offensive.

Yet it does not always appear to be the case, especially when people of different ethnicities that aren't considered white say the same thing. Surely they don't mean that they see everyone as white, since they aren't white themselves?
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 10:13:45 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/7/2015 11:26:02 PM, lamerde wrote:
There's also this:

https://www.psychologytoday.com...

I read the article, yet it seems to misconstrue the phrase to a great degree. Below are some quotes I read that didn't really show how the phrase "I'm colorblind" is bad.

"White people, who are unlikely to experience disadvantages due to race, can effectively ignore racism in American life ..."

This is correct, yet this merely describes what white people can do. It doesn't explain how colorblindness logically leads to this. For example, I personally know many people who say this phrase yet also recognize racism as an important problem in today's society.

"Colorblindness creates a society that denies their negative racial experiences, rejects their cultural heritage, and invalidates their unique perspectives."

I fail to see how someone's entire cultural heritage is summed up by their skin color. I do not mean to be offensive, but that seems like a rather shallow idea. Shouldn't cultural heritage go deeper than one's appearance? I also fail to see how treating people equally regardless of race (that is to say, not discriminating against certain races/ethnicities) results in ignoring someone's cultural heritage and invalidating "their unique perspectives."

"The need for colorblindness implies there is something shameful about the way God made me and the culture I was born into that we shouldn't talk about."

Again, this seems to be an emotional response. Remember that colorblindness means not discriminating against races and treating them equally. How does this imply that there is something shameful in the way God has made people of certain races and ethnicities?

Colorblindness isn't that we shouldn't talk about race or ethnicity, but that we shouldn't discriminate on the basis of it. At least, that's what I've gathered from the meaning of the phrase in my own personal experiences, not what people see online.
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 10:17:25 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 4:43:52 AM, FaustianJustice wrote:

Dude, I had no idea what that would be a bad thing, till I read your post, then realized what you were referring to. I don't think its a bad thing to say, if its true. Though, I don't generally think people whom state that are genuinely ignorant of color.

Yeah, it's probably virtually impossible for most people to 100% ignore the skin color of others (there may be some subconscious effects), but it's more about trying to achieve an ideal where you can treat people equally regardless of skin color, I guess.

And there are probably some people who use the phrase to ignore racism or with other bad intentions, but in my experiences this doesn't seem to be the case at all. Most people I know who claim this do believe that racism is an important problem in today's society.
Fly
Posts: 2,043
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 10:58:04 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 10:02:41 AM, PeacefulChaos wrote:
At 6/8/2015 12:58:08 AM, Fly wrote:

Here's a question-- do you know any people of color who claim to be colorblind?

I don't know if this is what you consider "people of color," but my mother who is from Iran claims the same thing. So do some other Persians in the community I live in. I also know a family from Brazil who agrees with this sentiment. There are probably hundreds of millions of different races or ethnicities out there that would agree with this idea.

Why do you ask?

Because I have just seen the concept brought up by white people, although I have not seen the concept brought up much at all in real life to be fair.

If colorblind simply means "not racist," to you, that is great. But that is not how it is taken by a lot of people. Instead, it is taken to mean that there is something wrong with color, and it should be graciously ignored somehow for that reason. It comes off as condescending.
"You don't have a right to be a jerk."
--Religion Forum's hypocrite extraordinaire serving up lulz
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,240
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 11:07:25 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 8:34:56 AM, Wylted wrote:
The theory is that you're discounting the unique experiences of different ethnicities by being colorblind.

Say for example your cellphone starts acting out and you look around and see an Asian, a white, a black, a Jew, an Indian, an Arab and let's throw in a mixed person. If you just go to random people without taking into account their unique cultural experiences, you might accidently go to the Asian person last and by that time they may be gone and your cellphone will never be fixed.

However if you look at their unique cultural experiences than you'll immediately ask the asain to fix your phone and you'll have your phone fixed. You may want to ask another race to fix your phone first just so you don't come across as racist by immediately going to the asain, but ultimately it doesn't matter too much.

However if you do go to another race before asking the asain, I reccomend avoiding the black guy, he'll steal your phone. Also avoid the Jew, he'll charge you too much to fix the phone.

See, this is what we get by fighting the natural trend of a homogeneous society with charges of racism.
EndarkenedRationalist
Posts: 14,201
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 11:57:29 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 8:34:56 AM, Wylted wrote:
The theory is that you're discounting the unique experiences of different ethnicities by being colorblind.

Say for example your cellphone starts acting out and you look around and see an Asian, a white, a black, a Jew, an Indian, an Arab and let's throw in a mixed person. If you just go to random people without taking into account their unique cultural experiences, you might accidently go to the Asian person last and by that time they may be gone and your cellphone will never be fixed.

However if you look at their unique cultural experiences than you'll immediately ask the asain to fix your phone and you'll have your phone fixed. You may want to ask another race to fix your phone first just so you don't come across as racist by immediately going to the asain, but ultimately it doesn't matter too much.

However if you do go to another race before asking the asain, I reccomend avoiding the black guy, he'll steal your phone. Also avoid the Jew, he'll charge you too much to fix the phone.

Do you ever wonder if you're going to hell?
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 12:01:01 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 11:57:29 AM, EndarkenedRationalist wrote:
At 6/8/2015 8:34:56 AM, Wylted wrote:
The theory is that you're discounting the unique experiences of different ethnicities by being colorblind.

Say for example your cellphone starts acting out and you look around and see an Asian, a white, a black, a Jew, an Indian, an Arab and let's throw in a mixed person. If you just go to random people without taking into account their unique cultural experiences, you might accidently go to the Asian person last and by that time they may be gone and your cellphone will never be fixed.

However if you look at their unique cultural experiences than you'll immediately ask the asain to fix your phone and you'll have your phone fixed. You may want to ask another race to fix your phone first just so you don't come across as racist by immediately going to the asain, but ultimately it doesn't matter too much.

However if you do go to another race before asking the asain, I reccomend avoiding the black guy, he'll steal your phone. Also avoid the Jew, he'll charge you too much to fix the phone.

Do you ever wonder if you're going to hell?

I've quite literally went through the process of selling my soul to Satan. There is no mystery as to wher I'll end up.
EndarkenedRationalist
Posts: 14,201
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 12:03:40 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 12:01:01 PM, Wylted wrote:
At 6/8/2015 11:57:29 AM, EndarkenedRationalist wrote:
At 6/8/2015 8:34:56 AM, Wylted wrote:
The theory is that you're discounting the unique experiences of different ethnicities by being colorblind.

Say for example your cellphone starts acting out and you look around and see an Asian, a white, a black, a Jew, an Indian, an Arab and let's throw in a mixed person. If you just go to random people without taking into account their unique cultural experiences, you might accidently go to the Asian person last and by that time they may be gone and your cellphone will never be fixed.

However if you look at their unique cultural experiences than you'll immediately ask the asain to fix your phone and you'll have your phone fixed. You may want to ask another race to fix your phone first just so you don't come across as racist by immediately going to the asain, but ultimately it doesn't matter too much.

However if you do go to another race before asking the asain, I reccomend avoiding the black guy, he'll steal your phone. Also avoid the Jew, he'll charge you too much to fix the phone.

Do you ever wonder if you're going to hell?

I've quite literally went through the process of selling my soul to Satan. There is no mystery as to wher I'll end up.

What did you get in return?
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 12:06:04 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 12:03:40 PM, EndarkenedRationalist wrote:
At 6/8/2015 12:01:01 PM, Wylted wrote:
At 6/8/2015 11:57:29 AM, EndarkenedRationalist wrote:
At 6/8/2015 8:34:56 AM, Wylted wrote:
The theory is that you're discounting the unique experiences of different ethnicities by being colorblind.

Say for example your cellphone starts acting out and you look around and see an Asian, a white, a black, a Jew, an Indian, an Arab and let's throw in a mixed person. If you just go to random people without taking into account their unique cultural experiences, you might accidently go to the Asian person last and by that time they may be gone and your cellphone will never be fixed.

However if you look at their unique cultural experiences than you'll immediately ask the asain to fix your phone and you'll have your phone fixed. You may want to ask another race to fix your phone first just so you don't come across as racist by immediately going to the asain, but ultimately it doesn't matter too much.

However if you do go to another race before asking the asain, I reccomend avoiding the black guy, he'll steal your phone. Also avoid the Jew, he'll charge you too much to fix the phone.

Do you ever wonder if you're going to hell?

I've quite literally went through the process of selling my soul to Satan. There is no mystery as to wher I'll end up.

What did you get in return?

I'm humble. I just asked for wisdom.
Vox_Veritas
Posts: 7,068
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 12:56:07 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Weird story related to the OP...
Some years ago I was in a store when I saw this weird kids book.
It was about a black kid who got into an accident or caught some disease (or something; I don't remember what it was) but he ended up being colorblind for a certain length of time. So his brother had a white friend, and he invited this white friend to hang with his colorblind brother. The colorblind guy didn't know that his brother's friend was white, so they hung out together. One day he regained his ability to perceive color and...that was the end of their friendship. The end.
Is that a messed up book or what?
Call me Vox, the Resident Contrarian of debate.org.

The DDO Blog:
https://debatedotorg.wordpress.com...

#drinkthecoffeenotthekoolaid
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,819
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 1:02:13 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/7/2015 11:00:27 PM, PeacefulChaos wrote:
I've seen many people who I know that say something along the lines of "I'm colorblind - I don't see race" and just as many people (online, that is) who find that statement offensive, racist, or ignorant. But despite the reasons people provide, I don't see how this phrase is bad.

When people say "I'm colorblind," they obviously don't mean literally colorblind (that is, in the context of discussions about race and racism). Instead, they mean that they see all people as human beings (not Black, White, Vietnamese, Persian, etc.) and that they necessarily don't discriminate against one race over others, since they see people as humans and not as a race. Why is this bad?

Some people say it's bad because it means you're ignoring racism. It is said that if you can't see color, then you can't see that people are being discriminated against on the basis of color. Except that's not what the phrase "I"m colorblind" means. It doesn't mean you literally cannot see color and you can't see that certain minority groups are being discriminated against more than the majority. It just means that you treat other races as equally as you can and don't discriminate against one more than another. Again, this isn't bad.

Others argue that it means you're ignoring someone's cultural/ethnic heritage, but since when did treating people equally mean you ignore someone's heritage? Even if you were literally colorblind and literally could not distinguish between black and white people, how does this mean you're ignoring ethnic heritage? What is the difference between race and ethnicity, exactly? Is the color of your skin the sum of your heritage and your entire culture? It doesn't make sense to me.

So if anyone could please kindly explain to me if I have misunderstood something and why people find this phrase offensive, I would gladly appreciate it. Thanks.
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 4:51:25 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 12:56:07 PM, Vox_Veritas wrote:
Weird story related to the OP...
Some years ago I was in a store when I saw this weird kids book.
It was about a black kid who got into an accident or caught some disease (or something; I don't remember what it was) but he ended up being colorblind for a certain length of time. So his brother had a white friend, and he invited this white friend to hang with his colorblind brother. The colorblind guy didn't know that his brother's friend was white, so they hung out together. One day he regained his ability to perceive color and...that was the end of their friendship. The end.
Is that a messed up book or what?

That's really screwed up. To think that two different races could be friends ... horrible!
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,819
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 5:16:41 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 4:54:18 PM, PeacefulChaos wrote:
At 6/8/2015 1:02:13 PM, PetersSmith wrote:


what

It's the response to why being colorblind is a "bad thing".
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 5:21:59 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 5:16:41 PM, PetersSmith wrote:

It's the response to why being colorblind is a "bad thing".

Is this because Courage is a dog ... and ... dogs are colorblind?
PetersSmith
Posts: 5,819
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 5:23:41 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 5:21:59 PM, PeacefulChaos wrote:
At 6/8/2015 5:16:41 PM, PetersSmith wrote:

It's the response to why being colorblind is a "bad thing".

Is this because Courage is a dog ... and ... dogs are colorblind?

No, it's because being colorblind puts you further away from being "perfect". And everything that prevents you from being "perfect" is a bad thing.
Empress of DDO (also Poll and Forum "Maintenance" Moderator)

"The two most important days in your life is the day you were born, and the day you find out why."
~Mark Twain

"Wow"
-Doge

"Don't believe everything you read on the internet just because there's a picture with a quote next to it."
~Abraham Lincoln

Guide to the Polls Section: http://www.debate.org...
PeacefulChaos
Posts: 2,610
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 5:25:41 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 6/8/2015 5:23:41 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
No, it's because being colorblind puts you further away from being "perfect". And everything that prevents you from being "perfect" is a bad thing.

I'll just stick with the dogs are colorblind thing
lamerde
Posts: 1,416
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
6/8/2015 8:08:58 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Psychological research has shown pretty consistently that we have to correct for our unconscious biases. Colourblind ideology does not allow for that.
Why I ignore YYW:
http://www.debate.org...
http://www.debate.org...
Calling someone a bitch multiple times while claiming you're taking the high road is an art form, I suppose: http://www.debate.org...