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Chinese parent teaches successful daughters!

Diqiucun_Cunmin
Posts: 2,710
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8/29/2015 3:13:39 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
His first daughter was a professor of music and linguistics at Harvard, his second a professor of chemistry, his third a noted children's book author and mathematics professor at Cornell, and his fourth a physics professor at MIT.

Did you think I was talking about Amy Chua? Nope... This thread is about a truly great Chinese parent. A towering figure in the field of linguistics, he is Y. R. Chao. (You know, the guy whose picture I had as my profile pic a while ago.)

If you're familiar with his work, you probably know that he's a fun-loving person. He was the first to create a context in which 'colourless green ideas sleep furiously' makes (pragmatic) sense and to translate Jabberwocky into Chinese. He also wrote the famous 'Shi shi shi shi shi' tongue twister.

Well, he was also a fun person when it came to educating his children. When his first two daughters were little, he would play with them and make up songs as they went. He would sit at the piano and let his first-born hum along as he played. Torch in hand, he explored the cosmos with his daughters at night, and he even turned reciting multiplication tables into a game.

His philosophy? Not to force his daughters into anything they didn't want to do, and let them develop their talents naturally. These days, parents force their kids to start learning to play instruments at the age of 3 or something, when they can barely even write their own names. (My piano teacher's son is reciting his times tables and he isn't even in primary school yet - true story.)

Y. R. Chao truly is the greatest Chinese linguist of our time... and his story is irrefutable proof that it doesn't take an Amy Chua or Xiao Baiyou to teach successful kids.

(No, contrary to popular belief, not every successful Asian kid had Amy Chua-like parents.)
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Vox_Veritas
Posts: 7,068
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8/29/2015 8:45:09 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I don't really know what the crap this thread is about, but since *I think* it's somewhat related to the OP, I'd like to point out a difference in Chinese and American parents:

Chinese parents generally want their kids to be really successful in school. They REALLY want this, to the point where they make their kids study for long hours each day and stuff like that. Chinese kids are pushed very hard to succeed, and they don't really have a lot of time for after school activities.
American kids are not generally pushed nearly as hard by their parents as their Chinese counterparts. They study for maybe 2 or 3 hours a day and they take the whole summer off.

The results of this are clear: American students generally do poorly compared to Chinese students. If American students were pushed that hard perhaps the U.S. could be leading the world in terms of education.
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Diqiucun_Cunmin
Posts: 2,710
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8/30/2015 3:10:58 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/29/2015 8:45:09 PM, Vox_Veritas wrote:
I don't really know what the crap this thread is about, but since *I think* it's somewhat related to the OP, I'd like to point out a difference in Chinese and American parents:

Chinese parents generally want their kids to be really successful in school. They REALLY want this, to the point where they make their kids study for long hours each day and stuff like that. Chinese kids are pushed very hard to succeed, and they don't really have a lot of time for after school activities.
American kids are not generally pushed nearly as hard by their parents as their Chinese counterparts. They study for maybe 2 or 3 hours a day and they take the whole summer off.

The results of this are clear: American students generally do poorly compared to Chinese students. If American students were pushed that hard perhaps the U.S. could be leading the world in terms of education.

My point is that truly great Chinese parents do not push their kids to do anything. In Confucian thought, we believe that doing well in school is a moral obligation, and the really successful parents aren't the ones coercing their kids into studying, but those who make them understand this obligation and fulfill it.

Y R Chao, as you can see, did not force her daughters into doing anything, but allowed them to develop their talents naturally. All of them ended up teaching prestigious universities. And - please don't take this as bragging - but I came first when I graduated from school, and my own parents rarely forced me to study.

In a less competitive environment like the US, where, I assume, kids are less motivated to study, their technique may work. However, in Chinese society, forcing kids to excel is, from my observations, rather futile and counterproductive.
The thing is, I hate relativism. I hate relativism more than I hate everything else, excepting, maybe, fibreglass powerboats... What it overlooks, to put it briefly and crudely, is the fixed structure of human nature. - Jerry Fodor

Don't be a stat cynic:
http://www.debate.org...

Response to conservative views on deforestation:
http://www.debate.org...

Topics I'd like to debate (not debating ATM): http://tinyurl.com...
triangle.128k
Posts: 3,638
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8/30/2015 4:08:52 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 8/30/2015 3:10:58 AM, Diqiucun_Cunmin wrote:
At 8/29/2015 8:45:09 PM, Vox_Veritas wrote:
I don't really know what the crap this thread is about, but since *I think* it's somewhat related to the OP, I'd like to point out a difference in Chinese and American parents:

Chinese parents generally want their kids to be really successful in school. They REALLY want this, to the point where they make their kids study for long hours each day and stuff like that. Chinese kids are pushed very hard to succeed, and they don't really have a lot of time for after school activities.
American kids are not generally pushed nearly as hard by their parents as their Chinese counterparts. They study for maybe 2 or 3 hours a day and they take the whole summer off.

The results of this are clear: American students generally do poorly compared to Chinese students. If American students were pushed that hard perhaps the U.S. could be leading the world in terms of education.

My point is that truly great Chinese parents do not push their kids to do anything. In Confucian thought, we believe that doing well in school is a moral obligation, and the really successful parents aren't the ones coercing their kids into studying, but those who make them understand this obligation and fulfill it.

Y R Chao, as you can see, did not force her daughters into doing anything, but allowed them to develop their talents naturally. All of them ended up teaching prestigious universities. And - please don't take this as bragging - but I came first when I graduated from school, and my own parents rarely forced me to study.

In a less competitive environment like the US, where, I assume, kids are less motivated to study, their technique may work. However, in Chinese society, forcing kids to excel is, from my observations, rather futile and counterproductive.

From what i've read, Chinese high schools are a little too memory-based. While high schools in China seem more rigorous though, it seems the opposite is true about universities. Most of the top Universities (Upenn, Harvard, Yale, etc.) come from the US.