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Caribbean Crime Deters Cruise Lines

bsh1
Posts: 27,503
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10/8/2015 11:30:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Apparently, there is a lot of crime aimed at tourists in the Bahamas among other Caribbean nations. Several sexual assaults, including those against minors, have been recorded. There are reports that major Cruise Lines may be reconsidering whether to go to those stops, or whether to warn passengers signing up for Caribbean tours about the risks involved. [https://www.yahoo.com...]

Thoughts?
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Philocat
Posts: 728
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10/9/2015 3:15:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
As a cruise ship officer trainee, this remains an interesting concern, and a worrying one at that, considering how the Caribbean is one of the (if not the most) popular cruising locations.

Traditionally, man-made dangers to the shipping industry and the ships within it were predominantly posed by pirates. Yet it is relatively straightforward to defend ships against pirates, by either avoiding danger-zones, increasing speed or employing armed guards. But this is because a ship is a self-contained entity that can be monitored and adequately defended.

With cruise ships, it is virtually impossible to defend thousands of passengers going in different directions around the port. Hence there's a dilemma between employing guards to supervise passengers on shore excursions and between allowing passengers to experience an 'authentic' immersion in the local port. Passengers also like to explore, and dislike being constrained.

In other words, it's a toss-up between safe shore visits and enjoyable shore visits. In crime-free ports this is a false dichotomy, but in places such as the Bahamas a balance must be struck.

I would suggest that the cruise lines continue to travel to these ports as normal, but clearly warning and advising passengers on the local dangers. Also, there would have to be a clause in the terms and conditions of the cruise that exempts the cruise line from responsibility for any theft or harm done to passengers on shore excursions.
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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10/9/2015 4:16:35 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/9/2015 3:15:32 PM, Philocat wrote:
As a cruise ship officer trainee, this remains an interesting concern, and a worrying one at that, considering how the Caribbean is one of the (if not the most) popular cruising locations.

Traditionally, man-made dangers to the shipping industry and the ships within it were predominantly posed by pirates. Yet it is relatively straightforward to defend ships against pirates, by either avoiding danger-zones, increasing speed or employing armed guards. But this is because a ship is a self-contained entity that can be monitored and adequately defended.

With cruise ships, it is virtually impossible to defend thousands of passengers going in different directions around the port. Hence there's a dilemma between employing guards to supervise passengers on shore excursions and between allowing passengers to experience an 'authentic' immersion in the local port. Passengers also like to explore, and dislike being constrained.

In other words, it's a toss-up between safe shore visits and enjoyable shore visits. In crime-free ports this is a false dichotomy, but in places such as the Bahamas a balance must be struck.

I would suggest that the cruise lines continue to travel to these ports as normal, but clearly warning and advising passengers on the local dangers. Also, there would have to be a clause in the terms and conditions of the cruise that exempts the cruise line from responsibility for any theft or harm done to passengers on shore excursions.

I think these ships are becoming ridiculous monsters. Yea, to criminals they look like cash-registers on the horizon. No, I see no reason to limit their travel, but am becoming baffled as to why people want to take a trip on what is in essence a floating building.
Philocat
Posts: 728
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10/9/2015 6:02:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/9/2015 4:16:35 PM, TBR wrote:
At 10/9/2015 3:15:32 PM, Philocat wrote:
As a cruise ship officer trainee, this remains an interesting concern, and a worrying one at that, considering how the Caribbean is one of the (if not the most) popular cruising locations.

Traditionally, man-made dangers to the shipping industry and the ships within it were predominantly posed by pirates. Yet it is relatively straightforward to defend ships against pirates, by either avoiding danger-zones, increasing speed or employing armed guards. But this is because a ship is a self-contained entity that can be monitored and adequately defended.

With cruise ships, it is virtually impossible to defend thousands of passengers going in different directions around the port. Hence there's a dilemma between employing guards to supervise passengers on shore excursions and between allowing passengers to experience an 'authentic' immersion in the local port. Passengers also like to explore, and dislike being constrained.

In other words, it's a toss-up between safe shore visits and enjoyable shore visits. In crime-free ports this is a false dichotomy, but in places such as the Bahamas a balance must be struck.

I would suggest that the cruise lines continue to travel to these ports as normal, but clearly warning and advising passengers on the local dangers. Also, there would have to be a clause in the terms and conditions of the cruise that exempts the cruise line from responsibility for any theft or harm done to passengers on shore excursions.

I think these ships are becoming ridiculous monsters. Yea, to criminals they look like cash-registers on the horizon. No, I see no reason to limit their travel, but am becoming baffled as to why people want to take a trip on what is in essence a floating building.

Some are like that; one lecturer of mine is fond of referring to them as 'floating brothels'...

Nevertheless, there are some ugly cruise ships (http://deckplangenius.com...) and there are some beautiful cruise ships (http://images.cruisemates.com...).

But at the end of the day, what it looks like on the inside is what really counts.