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Sesame Street Introduces Autistic Character

bsh1
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10/22/2015 9:47:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Sesame Street introduces a female Autistic character on their set, as part of an effort to de-otherize people with the condition. I think it is esp. significant that the character is female, as portrayal of Autistic characters in popular media tends to focus around men. Additionally:

"As part of the effort to destigmatize autism, which affects 1 in 68 children in America, Sesame Workshop has also unveiled an interactive website called Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children, along with resources for families, teachers, and caregivers. These include guides to simplify everyday activities that can pose challenges for children affected by autism, including bedtime routines, going to the grocery store, and brushing teeth." [https://www.yahoo.com...]

I am extremely pleased by Sesame Street's decision here. No child deserves to feel like they can't make friends or don't fit in or are unacceptably "wierd" because of that kind of condition; having positive role models like this character is crucial for them. Moreover, the outreach to parents will hopefully empower those family's to better cope with the unique challenges they face.

What are your thoughts?
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Hayd
Posts: 4,022
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10/22/2015 10:03:42 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/22/2015 9:47:21 PM, bsh1 wrote:
Sesame Street introduces a female Autistic character on their set, as part of an effort to de-otherize people with the condition. I think it is esp. significant that the character is female, as portrayal of Autistic characters in popular media tends to focus around men. Additionally:

"As part of the effort to destigmatize autism, which affects 1 in 68 children in America, Sesame Workshop has also unveiled an interactive website called Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children, along with resources for families, teachers, and caregivers. These include guides to simplify everyday activities that can pose challenges for children affected by autism, including bedtime routines, going to the grocery store, and brushing teeth." [https://www.yahoo.com...]

I am extremely pleased by Sesame Street's decision here. No child deserves to feel like they can't make friends or don't fit in or are unacceptably "wierd" because of that kind of condition; having positive role models like this character is crucial for them. Moreover, the outreach to parents will hopefully empower those family's to better cope with the unique challenges they face.

What are your thoughts?

This is great. I wonder how it will really get through to kids, I don't remember the age group that watches Sesame Street, but the ages too young to retain this information, or remeber anything from Sesame Street when they get older, I know I don't remember anything, and an autistic child they know would probably not tell them that he/she is autistic, but in the unlikely chance they did, and they paid attention to the lessons being taught, then this might have some impact. So I don't think it would have any significant impact, but it might to a select few, and at least they are doing something.
kasmic
Posts: 1,302
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10/22/2015 10:07:08 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/22/2015 9:47:21 PM, bsh1 wrote:

I am extremely pleased by Sesame Street's decision here.

+1
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bsh1
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10/22/2015 10:09:56 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/22/2015 10:03:42 PM, Hayd wrote:
At 10/22/2015 9:47:21 PM, bsh1 wrote:
Sesame Street introduces a female Autistic character on their set, as part of an effort to de-otherize people with the condition. I think it is esp. significant that the character is female, as portrayal of Autistic characters in popular media tends to focus around men. Additionally:

"As part of the effort to destigmatize autism, which affects 1 in 68 children in America, Sesame Workshop has also unveiled an interactive website called Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children, along with resources for families, teachers, and caregivers. These include guides to simplify everyday activities that can pose challenges for children affected by autism, including bedtime routines, going to the grocery store, and brushing teeth." [https://www.yahoo.com...]

I am extremely pleased by Sesame Street's decision here. No child deserves to feel like they can't make friends or don't fit in or are unacceptably "wierd" because of that kind of condition; having positive role models like this character is crucial for them. Moreover, the outreach to parents will hopefully empower those family's to better cope with the unique challenges they face.

What are your thoughts?

This is great. I wonder how it will really get through to kids, I don't remember the age group that watches Sesame Street, but the ages too young to retain this information, or remeber anything from Sesame Street when they get older, I know I don't remember anything, and an autistic child they know would probably not tell them that he/she is autistic, but in the unlikely chance they did, and they paid attention to the lessons being taught, then this might have some impact. So I don't think it would have any significant impact, but it might to a select few, and at least they are doing something.

Even if they don't remember it, it will help begin to create a culture of tolerance towards Autism from early on in life.
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1harderthanyouthink
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10/22/2015 10:24:39 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
(All I think about when Sesame Street is mentioned.)

https://www.youtube.com...
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Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,280
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10/23/2015 3:53:00 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/22/2015 9:47:21 PM, bsh1 wrote:
No child deserves to feel like they can't make friends or don't fit in or are unacceptably "wierd" because of that kind of condition; having positive role models like this character is crucial for them. Moreover, the outreach to parents will hopefully empower those family's to better cope with the unique challenges they face.

I find it kind of ironic that some very common attributes of autism (inability to decipher social cues in media, aversion to emotional bonds) makes this sort of recognition difficult at best, and makes 'making friends' a goal that they may not necessarily want to reach. This will be much more helpful, I think, for average children than it will be for autistic ones.
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Yassine
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10/23/2015 4:29:37 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/23/2015 3:53:00 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 10/22/2015 9:47:21 PM, bsh1 wrote:
No child deserves to feel like they can't make friends or don't fit in or are unacceptably "wierd" because of that kind of condition; having positive role models like this character is crucial for them. Moreover, the outreach to parents will hopefully empower those family's to better cope with the unique challenges they face.

I find it kind of ironic that some very common attributes of autism (inability to decipher social cues in media, aversion to emotional bonds) makes this sort of recognition difficult at best, and makes 'making friends' a goal that they may not necessarily want to reach. This will be much more helpful, I think, for average children than it will be for autistic ones.

- It is more ironic that these attributes may be praiseworthy in other societies. In North Africa, for instance, being autistic may virtually be equivalent to being wise. Beside, the concept there doesn't even exist, at least I've never heard of it. I never understood what's the big deal about "making friends" in the West. People in North Africa care about family, not friends.
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JMcKinley
Posts: 314
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10/23/2015 11:50:01 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/23/2015 3:53:00 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 10/22/2015 9:47:21 PM, bsh1 wrote:
No child deserves to feel like they can't make friends or don't fit in or are unacceptably "wierd" because of that kind of condition; having positive role models like this character is crucial for them. Moreover, the outreach to parents will hopefully empower those family's to better cope with the unique challenges they face.

I find it kind of ironic that some very common attributes of autism (inability to decipher social cues in media, aversion to emotional bonds) makes this sort of recognition difficult at best, and makes 'making friends' a goal that they may not necessarily want to reach. This will be much more helpful, I think, for average children than it will be for autistic ones.

It just depends on where they fall in the spectrum. My sister for example has very little interest in friends. That's just the way she is. Sometimes I feel quite sad for her because I know that she doesn't have a real friend. There are some kids at school that are quite nice and friendly with her, but she's not really friends with them in the traditional sense. But then I remember that her brain just works differently than mine and she places almost no value on friends. What brings her satisfaction and happiness is very different from me and I need to remind myself of that. My sister likely wouldn't have cared at all about a sesame street character with autism. She might not even realize the connection they share.

But then I know of another young girl with autism who is mild enough to fully realize and understand that she is not like everyone else, and that there is nothing she can do to change it. But she wants to be like the other kids. She wants to have friends and live a normal life and she is struggling very much to find her place. This child might have benefited from a relateable character.
TBR
Posts: 9,991
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10/23/2015 3:42:52 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/22/2015 9:47:21 PM, bsh1 wrote:
Sesame Street introduces a female Autistic character on their set, as part of an effort to de-otherize people with the condition. I think it is esp. significant that the character is female, as portrayal of Autistic characters in popular media tends to focus around men. Additionally:

"As part of the effort to destigmatize autism, which affects 1 in 68 children in America, Sesame Workshop has also unveiled an interactive website called Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children, along with resources for families, teachers, and caregivers. These include guides to simplify everyday activities that can pose challenges for children affected by autism, including bedtime routines, going to the grocery store, and brushing teeth." [https://www.yahoo.com...]

I am extremely pleased by Sesame Street's decision here. No child deserves to feel like they can't make friends or don't fit in or are unacceptably "wierd" because of that kind of condition; having positive role models like this character is crucial for them. Moreover, the outreach to parents will hopefully empower those family's to better cope with the unique challenges they face.

What are your thoughts?

Right after school, well forever really, I wanted to go to work Sesame Street. But... Henson was already dead - they didn't need an IT guy on the street. Whatever.
TBR
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10/23/2015 3:47:49 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
This was my favorite as a kid.

and this was my favorite as a young adult.

last favorite as an adult.
Fkkize
Posts: 2,149
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10/23/2015 6:05:37 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/22/2015 9:47:21 PM, bsh1 wrote:
Sesame Street introduces a female Autistic character on their set, as part of an effort to de-otherize people with the condition. I think it is esp. significant that the character is female, as portrayal of Autistic characters in popular media tends to focus around men.
Good point.

I am extremely pleased by Sesame Street's decision here. No child deserves to feel like they can't make friends or don't fit in or are unacceptably "wierd" because of that kind of condition; having positive role models like this character is crucial for them. Moreover, the outreach to parents will hopefully empower those family's to better cope with the unique challenges they face.

I think the greatest benefit of this is the possible change in attitude of parents and neuro-typical kids. For the autistic kids themselves, I think the majority of them wouldn't care.
From all the people with autism I know (I worked at a special needs school for a year) there is only one who desired friendship and social activities (but he never visited such a school).
: At 7/2/2016 3:05:07 PM, Rational_Thinker9119 wrote:
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: space contradicts logic
bsh1
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10/23/2015 6:07:17 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/23/2015 6:05:37 PM, Fkkize wrote:
I think the greatest benefit of this is the possible change in attitude of parents and neuro-typical kids. For the autistic kids themselves, I think the majority of them wouldn't care.
From all the people with autism I know (I worked at a special needs school for a year) there is only one who desired friendship and social activities (but he never visited such a school).

I've known several who did express loneliness and a desire for friendship.
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Fkkize
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10/23/2015 6:46:10 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/23/2015 6:07:17 PM, bsh1 wrote:
At 10/23/2015 6:05:37 PM, Fkkize wrote:
I think the greatest benefit of this is the possible change in attitude of parents and neuro-typical kids. For the autistic kids themselves, I think the majority of them wouldn't care.
From all the people with autism I know (I worked at a special needs school for a year) there is only one who desired friendship and social activities (but he never visited such a school).

I've known several who did express loneliness and a desire for friendship.

It really depends on where those people are on the spectrum. And it probably changes with age.
: At 7/2/2016 3:05:07 PM, Rational_Thinker9119 wrote:
:
: space contradicts logic
Illegalcombatant
Posts: 4,008
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10/24/2015 2:53:28 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/22/2015 9:47:21 PM, bsh1 wrote:
Sesame Street introduces a female Autistic character on their set, as part of an effort to de-otherize people with the condition. I think it is esp. significant that the character is female, as portrayal of Autistic characters in popular media tends to focus around men. Additionally:

"As part of the effort to destigmatize autism, which affects 1 in 68 children in America, Sesame Workshop has also unveiled an interactive website called Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children, along with resources for families, teachers, and caregivers. These include guides to simplify everyday activities that can pose challenges for children affected by autism, including bedtime routines, going to the grocery store, and brushing teeth." [https://www.yahoo.com...]

I am extremely pleased by Sesame Street's decision here. No child deserves to feel like they can't make friends or don't fit in or are unacceptably "wierd" because of that kind of condition; having positive role models like this character is crucial for them. Moreover, the outreach to parents will hopefully empower those family's to better cope with the unique challenges they face.

What are your thoughts?

I think Bert and Ernie were positive role models for you......................if ya catch my drift.
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bsh1
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10/24/2015 2:54:45 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 10/24/2015 2:53:28 AM, Illegalcombatant wrote:
I think Bert and Ernie were positive role models for you......................if ya catch my drift.

Lol...

I mean, I think that their bromance does promote more tolerant opinions among young people.
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"[Bsh1] is the Guinan of DDO." - ButterCatX

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