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Definition of Homophobia

Internet
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2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.
EndarkenedRationalist
Posts: 14,201
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2/3/2016 11:49:32 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
If you use "gay' to mean anything but "happy" but refuse to use "homophobe' to mean anything but 'having a fear of,' you are applying a double standard.
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,280
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2/3/2016 11:58:01 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

It's not just an irrational fear, it's an irrational fear or aversion to. The suffix does have a non-clinical use; 'hydrophobic' being used to describe lipids is a good example of this.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Jovian
Posts: 1,720
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2/4/2016 12:00:46 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear.

The term homophobia is a flawed one. But things like antisemitism is also a flawed one, since there are more Semitic people than Jews. I guess it has been about older misunderstandings just remaining in the language.

Even many pro-LGBT people find homosexuals kissing in the street disgusting. That is just taste and preferences, but the thing is many people use their dislike for homosexuality as a reason homosexuals shouldn't be respected by society at all.

Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe?

Apples and oranges. Disliking objects/hobbies vs disliking humans.

I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

Many homophobes although do not even get close to homosexuals if they know these people are homosexuals.
Internet
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2/4/2016 12:10:04 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/3/2016 11:49:32 PM, EndarkenedRationalist wrote:
If you use "gay' to mean anything but "happy" but refuse to use "homophobe' to mean anything but 'having a fear of,' you are applying a double standard.

How.
Internet
Posts: 59
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2/4/2016 12:12:56 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/3/2016 11:58:01 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

It's not just an irrational fear, it's an irrational fear or aversion to. The suffix does have a non-clinical use; 'hydrophobic' being used to describe lipids is a good example of this.

Aversion is defined as a strong/extreme dislike, as opposed to a simple dislike.
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,280
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2/4/2016 12:23:39 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 12:12:56 AM, Internet wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:58:01 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

It's not just an irrational fear, it's an irrational fear or aversion to. The suffix does have a non-clinical use; 'hydrophobic' being used to describe lipids is a good example of this.

Aversion is defined as a strong/extreme dislike, as opposed to a simple dislike.

2. The avoidance of a thing, situation, or behavior because it has been associated with an unpleasant or painful stimulus.

https://ahdictionary.com...

Friendly hint: using dictionaries when discussing most topics is not usually productive.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Internet
Posts: 59
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2/4/2016 12:23:59 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 12:00:46 AM, Jovian wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear.

The term homophobia is a flawed one. But things like antisemitism is also a flawed one, since there are more Semitic people than Jews. I guess it has been about older misunderstandings just remaining in the language.

Even many pro-LGBT people find homosexuals kissing in the street disgusting. That is just taste and preferences, but the thing is many people use their dislike for homosexuality as a reason homosexuals shouldn't be respected by society at all.

So how should homophobia be defined

Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe?

Apples and oranges. Disliking objects/hobbies vs disliking humans.

I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

Many homophobes although do not even get close to homosexuals if they know these people are homosexuals.

I can sit next to a smelly person, would prefer not to though.
Internet
Posts: 59
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2/4/2016 12:26:14 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 12:23:39 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:12:56 AM, Internet wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:58:01 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

It's not just an irrational fear, it's an irrational fear or aversion to. The suffix does have a non-clinical use; 'hydrophobic' being used to describe lipids is a good example of this.

Aversion is defined as a strong/extreme dislike, as opposed to a simple dislike.

2. The avoidance of a thing, situation, or behavior because it has been associated with an unpleasant or painful stimulus.

https://ahdictionary.com...

Friendly hint: using dictionaries when discussing most topics is not usually productive.

I prefer the oxford definition, as it isnt nearly as over encompassing. Plus, no point in discussing anything until we know what eachother mean
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,280
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2/4/2016 12:29:19 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 12:26:14 AM, Internet wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:23:39 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:12:56 AM, Internet wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:58:01 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

It's not just an irrational fear, it's an irrational fear or aversion to. The suffix does have a non-clinical use; 'hydrophobic' being used to describe lipids is a good example of this.

Aversion is defined as a strong/extreme dislike, as opposed to a simple dislike.

2. The avoidance of a thing, situation, or behavior because it has been associated with an unpleasant or painful stimulus.

https://ahdictionary.com...

Friendly hint: using dictionaries when discussing most topics is not usually productive.

I prefer the oxford definition, as it isnt nearly as over encompassing. Plus, no point in discussing anything until we know what eachother mean

If you were legitimately unfamiliar with the word, that's fine. But the American Heritage is, in my opinion, a better dictionary. The sense in which I quoted it is the more scientific usage, while the first definition (which you used) is more literary.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
EndarkenedRationalist
Posts: 14,201
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2/4/2016 12:39:25 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 12:10:04 AM, Internet wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:49:32 PM, EndarkenedRationalist wrote:
If you use "gay' to mean anything but "happy" but refuse to use "homophobe' to mean anything but 'having a fear of,' you are applying a double standard.

How.

By the original definition of "gay," it just means happy. Colloquially, it now means a homosexual (male). By the original definition of "homophobia," it Just means a fear or aversion. Colloquially, now it means someone who hates or dislikes homosexuals.
Diqiucun_Cunmin
Posts: 2,710
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2/4/2016 4:48:26 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 12:39:25 AM, EndarkenedRationalist wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:10:04 AM, Internet wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:49:32 PM, EndarkenedRationalist wrote:
If you use "gay' to mean anything but "happy" but refuse to use "homophobe' to mean anything but 'having a fear of,' you are applying a double standard.

How.

By the original definition of "gay," it just means happy. Colloquially, it now means a homosexual (male). By the original definition of "homophobia," it Just means a fear or aversion. Colloquially, now it means someone who hates or dislikes homosexuals.

^This. Etymology isn't meaning - I say this every time someone brings up this topic.
The thing is, I hate relativism. I hate relativism more than I hate everything else, excepting, maybe, fibreglass powerboats... What it overlooks, to put it briefly and crudely, is the fixed structure of human nature. - Jerry Fodor

Don't be a stat cynic:
http://www.debate.org...

Response to conservative views on deforestation:
http://www.debate.org...

Topics I'd like to debate (not debating ATM): http://tinyurl.com...
Internet
Posts: 59
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2/4/2016 4:10:55 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 12:29:19 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:26:14 AM, Internet wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:23:39 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:12:56 AM, Internet wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:58:01 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

It's not just an irrational fear, it's an irrational fear or aversion to. The suffix does have a non-clinical use; 'hydrophobic' being used to describe lipids is a good example of this.

Aversion is defined as a strong/extreme dislike, as opposed to a simple dislike.

2. The avoidance of a thing, situation, or behavior because it has been associated with an unpleasant or painful stimulus.

https://ahdictionary.com...

Friendly hint: using dictionaries when discussing most topics is not usually productive.

I prefer the oxford definition, as it isnt nearly as over encompassing. Plus, no point in discussing anything until we know what eachother mean

If you were legitimately unfamiliar with the word, that's fine. But the American Heritage is, in my opinion, a better dictionary. The sense in which I quoted it is the more scientific usage, while the first definition (which you used) is more literary.

Maybe im missing ur point, if something is hydrophobic and wont mix with water at all, then that also seems like lipids have a extreme "fear" of water. If you are agree phobia should be attached to even simple dislikes, i'd like to know if you yoursef consider acrophobia to be a simple dislike of heights
Internet
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2/4/2016 4:38:32 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 12:39:25 AM, EndarkenedRationalist wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:10:04 AM, Internet wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:49:32 PM, EndarkenedRationalist wrote:
If you use "gay' to mean anything but "happy" but refuse to use "homophobe' to mean anything but 'having a fear of,' you are applying a double standard.

How.

By the original definition of "gay," it just means happy. Colloquially, it now means a homosexual (male). By the original definition of "homophobia," it Just means a fear or aversion. Colloquially, now it means someone who hates or dislikes

Im well aware of how people use the word homophobe now, its exactly why i made this thread. Do you agree or disagree that phobia should be tied to a simple dislike?
Skepsikyma
Posts: 8,280
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2/4/2016 11:40:32 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 4:10:55 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:29:19 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:26:14 AM, Internet wrote:
I prefer the oxford definition, as it isnt nearly as over encompassing. Plus, no point in discussing anything until we know what eachother mean

If you were legitimately unfamiliar with the word, that's fine. But the American Heritage is, in my opinion, a better dictionary. The sense in which I quoted it is the more scientific usage, while the first definition (which you used) is more literary.

Maybe im missing ur point, if something is hydrophobic and wont mix with water at all, then that also seems like lipids have a extreme "fear" of water. If you are agree phobia should be attached to even simple dislikes, i'd like to know if you yoursef consider acrophobia to be a simple dislike of heights

It can be either. Water obviously isn't afraid of oil. The phrase is part of two different terms: Hydrophobic (doesn't like water) vs. hydrophilic (likes water). It contrasts two different responses, one of which is aversive.
"The Collectivist experiment is thoroughly suited (in appearance at least) to the Capitalist society which it proposes to replace. It works with the existing machinery of Capitalism, talks and thinks in the existing terms of Capitalism, appeals to just those appetites which Capitalism has aroused, and ridicules as fantastic and unheard-of just those things in society the memory of which Capitalism has killed among men wherever the blight of it has spread."
- Hilaire Belloc -
Internet
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2/4/2016 11:58:06 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 11:40:32 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 4:10:55 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:29:19 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:26:14 AM, Internet wrote:
I prefer the oxford definition, as it isnt nearly as over encompassing. Plus, no point in discussing anything until we know what eachother mean

If you were legitimately unfamiliar with the word, that's fine. But the American Heritage is, in my opinion, a better dictionary. The sense in which I quoted it is the more scientific usage, while the first definition (which you used) is more literary.

Maybe im missing ur point, if something is hydrophobic and wont mix with water at all, then that also seems like lipids have a extreme "fear" of water. If you are agree phobia should be attached to even simple dislikes, i'd like to know if you yoursef consider acrophobia to be a simple dislike of heights

It can be either. Water obviously isn't afraid of oil. The phrase is part of two different terms: Hydrophobic (doesn't like water) vs. hydrophilic (likes water). It contrasts two different responses, one of which is aversive.

I was using a personification, clearly.

So you believe that even simple dislikes qualify as a phobia?
theworldhasgonemad
Posts: 633
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2/5/2016 11:19:37 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
I think that there needs to be a word for what you are describing.

Until that happens, homophobe is the closest we have.

Mysefl, I'm proud to be a homophobe. It is far more normal and natural to think have a same sex relationship is disgusting than to be turned on by it. Particularly in the case of a man where it usually involves poo, something that shouldn't be mixed with sex. Doesn't mean I hate gays. Those activists though ..... is there a homoactivistaphobia?
theworldhasgonemad
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2/5/2016 11:20:56 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
p.s. Internet

WEAR IT LIKE A BADGE. Don't be scared to be called a homophobe, be proud of it, and say you're happy to be one, because it is very normal to be one. (Doesn't mean you have to hate gay people).

#ProudHomophobe
Hoppi
Posts: 1,655
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2/5/2016 11:27:25 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

I'm an arachnophobe, but mostly I just dislike spiders because I'm at a safe distance from them. I don't freak out when I see a spider across the room. If i had to get naked with a spider and rub it all over my body, or have one squirming about in my mouth, I would TOTALLY PANIC though, so maybe it's the same for you and homosexuals.
Deb-8-A-Bull
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2/5/2016 12:19:04 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
Because homophobe means dislike some what hates homosexuals. Homosexuals have a phobia of homophobic men.
If your a genuine homophobe 2 hot chick's scissoring the sh1t out of each other should be equally disgusting.
Diqiucun_Cunmin
Posts: 2,710
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2/5/2016 12:50:50 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/4/2016 11:58:06 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/4/2016 11:40:32 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 4:10:55 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:29:19 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:26:14 AM, Internet wrote:
I prefer the oxford definition, as it isnt nearly as over encompassing. Plus, no point in discussing anything until we know what eachother mean

If you were legitimately unfamiliar with the word, that's fine. But the American Heritage is, in my opinion, a better dictionary. The sense in which I quoted it is the more scientific usage, while the first definition (which you used) is more literary.

Maybe im missing ur point, if something is hydrophobic and wont mix with water at all, then that also seems like lipids have a extreme "fear" of water. If you are agree phobia should be attached to even simple dislikes, i'd like to know if you yoursef consider acrophobia to be a simple dislike of heights

It can be either. Water obviously isn't afraid of oil. The phrase is part of two different terms: Hydrophobic (doesn't like water) vs. hydrophilic (likes water). It contrasts two different responses, one of which is aversive.

I was using a personification, clearly.

So you believe that even simple dislikes qualify as a phobia?

Why do you accept personification but reject litotes? Both processes are known to happen in diachronic semantics.
The thing is, I hate relativism. I hate relativism more than I hate everything else, excepting, maybe, fibreglass powerboats... What it overlooks, to put it briefly and crudely, is the fixed structure of human nature. - Jerry Fodor

Don't be a stat cynic:
http://www.debate.org...

Response to conservative views on deforestation:
http://www.debate.org...

Topics I'd like to debate (not debating ATM): http://tinyurl.com...
Internet
Posts: 59
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2/5/2016 2:27:32 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/5/2016 12:50:50 PM, Diqiucun_Cunmin wrote:
At 2/4/2016 11:58:06 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/4/2016 11:40:32 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 4:10:55 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:29:19 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:26:14 AM, Internet wrote:
I prefer the oxford definition, as it isnt nearly as over encompassing. Plus, no point in discussing anything until we know what eachother mean

If you were legitimately unfamiliar with the word, that's fine. But the American Heritage is, in my opinion, a better dictionary. The sense in which I quoted it is the more scientific usage, while the first definition (which you used) is more literary.

Maybe im missing ur point, if something is hydrophobic and wont mix with water at all, then that also seems like lipids have a extreme "fear" of water. If you are agree phobia should be attached to even simple dislikes, i'd like to know if you yoursef consider acrophobia to be a simple dislike of heights

It can be either. Water obviously isn't afraid of oil. The phrase is part of two different terms: Hydrophobic (doesn't like water) vs. hydrophilic (likes water). It contrasts two different responses, one of which is aversive.

I was using a personification, clearly.

So you believe that even simple dislikes qualify as a phobia?

Why do you accept personification but reject litotes? Both processes are known to happen in diachronic semantics

Not sure what you mean, but like everyone else you havent answered my question. As skep and i have been pointed out, everytime phobic is used in a word, its to show an aversion/extreme dislike towards something, all except with the word homophobe,
Internet
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2/5/2016 2:29:35 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/5/2016 11:19:37 AM, theworldhasgonemad wrote:
I think that there needs to be a word for what you are describing.

Until that happens, homophobe is the closest we have.

Mysefl, I'm proud to be a homophobe. It is far more normal and natural to think have a same sex relationship is disgusting than to be turned on by it. Particularly in the case of a man where it usually involves poo, something that shouldn't be mixed with sex. Doesn't mean I hate gays. Those activists though ..... is there a homoactivistaphobia?

I shall not wear the badge of irrational fear and look like an idiot
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
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2/5/2016 3:41:41 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/3/2016 11:58:01 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

It's not just an irrational fear, it's an irrational fear or aversion to. The suffix does have a non-clinical use; 'hydrophobic' being used to describe lipids is a good example of this.

I think the disgust feeling would make you phobic. Now if you hated homosexuals because God told you to, but had no disgust, that would not aualify as homophobic. I'm not Jewaphobic just because I think they are evil and faked the holocaust
Internet
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2/5/2016 4:05:07 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/5/2016 3:41:41 PM, Wylted wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:58:01 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

It's not just an irrational fear, it's an irrational fear or aversion to. The suffix does have a non-clinical use; 'hydrophobic' being used to describe lipids is a good example of this.

I think the disgust feeling would make you phobic. Now if you hated homosexuals because God told you to, but had no disgust, that would not aualify as homophobic. I'm not Jewaphobic just because I think they are evil and faked the holocaust

So anything you find disgusting qualifies as a phobia? Interesting
Wylted
Posts: 21,167
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2/5/2016 4:23:02 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/5/2016 4:05:07 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/5/2016 3:41:41 PM, Wylted wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:58:01 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

It's not just an irrational fear, it's an irrational fear or aversion to. The suffix does have a non-clinical use; 'hydrophobic' being used to describe lipids is a good example of this.

I think the disgust feeling would make you phobic. Now if you hated homosexuals because God told you to, but had no disgust, that would not aualify as homophobic. I'm not Jewaphobic just because I think they are evil and faked the holocaust

So anything you find disgusting qualifies as a phobia? Interesting

It's pretty much the original meaning of the term homophobic, which was actually created by homophobes to describe themselves, but generally yes. If you have a huge disgust of spiders so much that you react as if it is a fear ot wpuld be aracnophobia
Internet
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2/5/2016 4:37:40 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/5/2016 4:23:02 PM, Wylted wrote:
At 2/5/2016 4:05:07 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/5/2016 3:41:41 PM, Wylted wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:58:01 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/3/2016 11:44:20 PM, Internet wrote:
The other day my friend called me a homophobe because I had mentioned how I dislike the way gay people act. I told him that phobia meant an irrational or extreme fear of something, and that I wasnt scared of any homosexuals, i just found them gross. He told me that didnt matter though since the google definition states that a "dislike" of homosexuals is enough to consider me a homophobe. I of course found that ridculous, every other phobia is an irrational fear. Plus, if I dislike pepsi, but does that make me a pepsiphobe? I dislike playing soccer, does that make me a soccerphobe? I think you get the point. I want to know if anyone else thinks this definition should only include an extreme or irrational fear of homosexuals, and not just a dislike.

It's not just an irrational fear, it's an irrational fear or aversion to. The suffix does have a non-clinical use; 'hydrophobic' being used to describe lipids is a good example of this.

I think the disgust feeling would make you phobic. Now if you hated homosexuals because God told you to, but had no disgust, that would not aualify as homophobic. I'm not Jewaphobic just because I think they are evil and faked the holocaust

So anything you find disgusting qualifies as a phobia? Interesting

It's pretty much the original meaning of the term homophobic, which was actually created by homophobes to describe themselves,

Its to bad you cant support that

but generally yes. If you have a huge disgust of spiders so much that you react as if it is a fear ot wpuld be aracnophobia

You are definately conflating disgust with fear

How does seeing someone poop make you feel? How does the thought of dying make you feel?

Should be two distinct feelings
Diqiucun_Cunmin
Posts: 2,710
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2/6/2016 12:39:57 AM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/5/2016 2:27:32 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/5/2016 12:50:50 PM, Diqiucun_Cunmin wrote:
At 2/4/2016 11:58:06 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/4/2016 11:40:32 PM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 4:10:55 PM, Internet wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:29:19 AM, Skepsikyma wrote:
At 2/4/2016 12:26:14 AM, Internet wrote:
I prefer the oxford definition, as it isnt nearly as over encompassing. Plus, no point in discussing anything until we know what eachother mean

If you were legitimately unfamiliar with the word, that's fine. But the American Heritage is, in my opinion, a better dictionary. The sense in which I quoted it is the more scientific usage, while the first definition (which you used) is more literary.

Maybe im missing ur point, if something is hydrophobic and wont mix with water at all, then that also seems like lipids have a extreme "fear" of water. If you are agree phobia should be attached to even simple dislikes, i'd like to know if you yoursef consider acrophobia to be a simple dislike of heights

It can be either. Water obviously isn't afraid of oil. The phrase is part of two different terms: Hydrophobic (doesn't like water) vs. hydrophilic (likes water). It contrasts two different responses, one of which is aversive.

I was using a personification, clearly.

So you believe that even simple dislikes qualify as a phobia?

Why do you accept personification but reject litotes? Both processes are known to happen in diachronic semantics

Not sure what you mean, but like everyone else you havent answered my question. As skep and i have been pointed out, everytime phobic is used in a word, its to show an aversion/extreme dislike towards something, all except with the word homophobe,

You're fine with the morpheme 'phobia' being personified in the word 'hydrophobia', but not with it being weakened in 'homophobia'. Why do you accept personification but reject weakening?
The thing is, I hate relativism. I hate relativism more than I hate everything else, excepting, maybe, fibreglass powerboats... What it overlooks, to put it briefly and crudely, is the fixed structure of human nature. - Jerry Fodor

Don't be a stat cynic:
http://www.debate.org...

Response to conservative views on deforestation:
http://www.debate.org...

Topics I'd like to debate (not debating ATM): http://tinyurl.com...