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Extrajudicial Killing

PetersSmith
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6/26/2016 5:47:46 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
An extrajudicial killing is the killing of a person by governmental authorities without the sanction of any judicial proceeding or legal process. While some believe the US government carries this practice, section 3(a) of the United States Torture Victim Protection Act rules that extrajudicial killing of criminals is unlawful (https://books.google.com...). Recently, more than 50 people accused of dealing in illegal drugs have been murdered in the Philippines within a month after incoming president Rodrigo Duterte called for more extrajudicial killings against suspected criminals (http://www.rappler.com...). Duterte has had extreme policies towards criminals, but over a period of 20 years, he turned Davao City from the "murder capital of the Philippines" to what tourism organisations now describe as "the most peaceful city in southeast Asia" (http://www.news.com.au...). Now president, Duterte has promised to suppress crime and illegal drug use in the country within 3 to 6 months. So despite his extreme measures, it's somewhat plausible to say that Duterte has been quite effective in eliminating crime from his country.

Extrajudicial killings and death squads are also used in Iraq, Central America, Colombia, India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, several nations or regions in Africa, Jamaica, Kosovo, parts of South America,allegedly Russia, Uzbekistan, parts of Thailand, Turkey, and by Israeli forces. However, some people are concerned that the US is also carrying out this practice. "According to a recent study, the shooting death of Trayvon Martin and the acquittal of his killer is not unique. In "Operation Ghetto Storm," the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement (MXGM) found at least 136 unarmed African Americans were killed by police, security guards and self-appointed vigilantes in 2012" (http://www.democracynow.org...). "Although the number of US law enforcement agents killed in the line of duty is well documented (for 2015, 26 killed by shootings as of mid-September, of whom 17 were police officers), no reliable official data exist on the number of US persons killed by the police...we propose that law-enforcement"related deaths be treated as a notifiable condition, which would allow public health departments to report these data in real-time, at the local as well as national level, thereby providing data needed to understand and prevent the problem" (http://journals.plos.org...).

The Guardian has been recording criminals killed by the police in a project called "The Counted". It claims that 516 people have been killed so far in 2016, 2.92 Black per million, 1.39 Hispanic/Latino, and 1.27 White. In 2015, 1,146 have been killed. 7.27 Black per million, 3.51 Hispanic/Latino, and 2.93 White. Several of these "victims" were unarmed (http://www.theguardian.com...).

So there may be an issue here, but according to cases like with Duterte it might actually be effective. Do you think that the US government is trying to carry out extrajudicial killings to curb crime (or possibly just avoid the extensive legal process)? Do you think all of this is just a coincidence? Do you think this might be a "race thing"? And finally, would you support extrajudicial killings of certain criminals? Discuss.
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Blade-of-Truth
Posts: 5,020
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6/26/2016 7:38:53 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/26/2016 5:47:46 PM, PetersSmith wrote:
An extrajudicial killing is the killing of a person by governmental authorities without the sanction of any judicial proceeding or legal process. While some believe the US government carries this practice, section 3(a) of the United States Torture Victim Protection Act rules that extrajudicial killing of criminals is unlawful (https://books.google.com...). Recently, more than 50 people accused of dealing in illegal drugs have been murdered in the Philippines within a month after incoming president Rodrigo Duterte called for more extrajudicial killings against suspected criminals (http://www.rappler.com...). Duterte has had extreme policies towards criminals, but over a period of 20 years, he turned Davao City from the "murder capital of the Philippines" to what tourism organisations now describe as "the most peaceful city in southeast Asia" (http://www.news.com.au...). Now president, Duterte has promised to suppress crime and illegal drug use in the country within 3 to 6 months. So despite his extreme measures, it's somewhat plausible to say that Duterte has been quite effective in eliminating crime from his country.

Extrajudicial killings and death squads are also used in Iraq, Central America, Colombia, India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, several nations or regions in Africa, Jamaica, Kosovo, parts of South America,allegedly Russia, Uzbekistan, parts of Thailand, Turkey, and by Israeli forces. However, some people are concerned that the US is also carrying out this practice. "According to a recent study, the shooting death of Trayvon Martin and the acquittal of his killer is not unique. In "Operation Ghetto Storm," the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement (MXGM) found at least 136 unarmed African Americans were killed by police, security guards and self-appointed vigilantes in 2012" (http://www.democracynow.org...). "Although the number of US law enforcement agents killed in the line of duty is well documented (for 2015, 26 killed by shootings as of mid-September, of whom 17 were police officers), no reliable official data exist on the number of US persons killed by the police...we propose that law-enforcement"related deaths be treated as a notifiable condition, which would allow public health departments to report these data in real-time, at the local as well as national level, thereby providing data needed to understand and prevent the problem" (http://journals.plos.org...).

The Guardian has been recording criminals killed by the police in a project called "The Counted". It claims that 516 people have been killed so far in 2016, 2.92 Black per million, 1.39 Hispanic/Latino, and 1.27 White. In 2015, 1,146 have been killed. 7.27 Black per million, 3.51 Hispanic/Latino, and 2.93 White. Several of these "victims" were unarmed (http://www.theguardian.com...).

So there may be an issue here, but according to cases like with Duterte it might actually be effective. Do you think that the US government is trying to carry out extrajudicial killings to curb crime (or possibly just avoid the extensive legal process)? Do you think all of this is just a coincidence? Do you think this might be a "race thing"? And finally, would you support extrajudicial killings of certain criminals? Discuss.

I'd like to hear your own thoughts since you're the OP. Surely you have an opinion on these matters as well since you raised this discussion.

Do you think that the US government is trying to carry out extrajudicial killings to curb crime (or possibly just avoid the extensive legal process)? Do you think all of this is just a coincidence? Do you think this might be a "race thing"? And finally, would you support extrajudicial killings of certain criminals?
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