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Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
It's becoming increasingly popular for potential employers and other interviewers (including academic) to monitor your online activity. While it's common knowledge that most applicants are Googled and searched on social networks when applying for a job, in cases where they cannot be found, employers are putting them on the spot during the interview. They used to request social media passwords; now they ask to "shoulder surf" as more privacy laws against password demands have come into play. Essentially they ask you to log-in and then read over your shoulder. They want to be able to see your social networking pages/messages even if your privacy settings are "hidden" from view.

Thoughts? I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.
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Danielle
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7/19/2016 4:02:35 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM, Danielle wrote:
I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.

(I'm one of them...)
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HeavenlyPanda
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7/19/2016 4:05:08 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM, Danielle wrote:
It's becoming increasingly popular for potential employers and other interviewers (including academic) to monitor your online activity. While it's common knowledge that most applicants are Googled and searched on social networks when applying for a job, in cases where they cannot be found, employers are putting them on the spot during the interview. They used to request social media passwords; now they ask to "shoulder surf" as more privacy laws against password demands have come into play. Essentially they ask you to log-in and then read over your shoulder. They want to be able to see your social networking pages/messages even if your privacy settings are "hidden" from view.

Thoughts? I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.

I think that what you do away from your job life should not effect your job life. When you want to relax with friends and do something crazy, businesses and potential jobs should not judge you on that. As long as your good at your work, what you do while relaxing away from work should not matter.
HeavenlyPanda. The most heavenly of all heavenly creatures.
Vox_Veritas
Posts: 7,075
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7/19/2016 4:15:31 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:05:08 AM, HeavenlyPanda wrote:
At 7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM, Danielle wrote:
It's becoming increasingly popular for potential employers and other interviewers (including academic) to monitor your online activity. While it's common knowledge that most applicants are Googled and searched on social networks when applying for a job, in cases where they cannot be found, employers are putting them on the spot during the interview. They used to request social media passwords; now they ask to "shoulder surf" as more privacy laws against password demands have come into play. Essentially they ask you to log-in and then read over your shoulder. They want to be able to see your social networking pages/messages even if your privacy settings are "hidden" from view.

Thoughts? I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.

I think that what you do away from your job life should not affect your job life. When you want to relax with friends and do something crazy, businesses and potential jobs should not judge you on that. As long as you're good at your work, what you do while relaxing away from work should not matter.

+1
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Danielle
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7/19/2016 4:17:29 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:05:08 AM, HeavenlyPanda wrote:
I think that what you do away from your job life should not effect your job life. When you want to relax with friends and do something crazy, businesses and potential jobs should not judge you on that. As long as your good at your work, what you do while relaxing away from work should not matter.

Do you think employers should legally be allowed to do this?
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PetersSmith
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7/19/2016 5:52:34 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM, Danielle wrote:
It's becoming increasingly popular for potential employers and other interviewers (including academic) to monitor your online activity. While it's common knowledge that most applicants are Googled and searched on social networks when applying for a job, in cases where they cannot be found, employers are putting them on the spot during the interview. They used to request social media passwords; now they ask to "shoulder surf" as more privacy laws against password demands have come into play. Essentially they ask you to log-in and then read over your shoulder. They want to be able to see your social networking pages/messages even if your privacy settings are "hidden" from view.

Thoughts? I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.

I think that's a little silly. What you do on the Internet privately doesn't necessarily reflect how you will perform on your job.
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HeavenlyPanda
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7/19/2016 12:05:37 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:17:29 AM, Danielle wrote:
At 7/19/2016 4:05:08 AM, HeavenlyPanda wrote:
I think that what you do away from your job life should not effect your job life. When you want to relax with friends and do something crazy, businesses and potential jobs should not judge you on that. As long as your good at your work, what you do while relaxing away from work should not matter.

Do you think employers should legally be allowed to do this?

Employers can be allowed to do this but I don't think it should effect how you get the job.
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FaustianJustice
Posts: 6,235
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7/19/2016 12:24:27 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM, Danielle wrote:
It's becoming increasingly popular for potential employers and other interviewers (including academic) to monitor your online activity. While it's common knowledge that most applicants are Googled and searched on social networks when applying for a job, in cases where they cannot be found, employers are putting them on the spot during the interview. They used to request social media passwords; now they ask to "shoulder surf" as more privacy laws against password demands have come into play. Essentially they ask you to log-in and then read over your shoulder. They want to be able to see your social networking pages/messages even if your privacy settings are "hidden" from view.

Thoughts? I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.

Its the company in question's onus to find whatever dirt they want to hold against some one.

Given the nature of how many various institutions are linked, I don't think it would be unreasonable for a person to reject this request based on reasons of prevention of ID theft and security reasons.
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Skepsikyma
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7/19/2016 1:56:08 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM, Danielle wrote:
It's becoming increasingly popular for potential employers and other interviewers (including academic) to monitor your online activity. While it's common knowledge that most applicants are Googled and searched on social networks when applying for a job, in cases where they cannot be found, employers are putting them on the spot during the interview. They used to request social media passwords; now they ask to "shoulder surf" as more privacy laws against password demands have come into play. Essentially they ask you to log-in and then read over your shoulder. They want to be able to see your social networking pages/messages even if your privacy settings are "hidden" from view.

Thoughts? I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.

Legally prohibiting it would be too tricky. Personally, if that ever happened to me in a job interview I would get up and walk out. It is courteous, as an employee, to leave one's personal life at the door. I do that every day at my job. To have any employee to then pry into one's personal life us so severe a breach of etiquette that it qualifies as an insult. Nobody who interviews for a job should stand for it, and those who practice this ought to be castigated for it.
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YYW
Posts: 36,335
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7/19/2016 2:16:17 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM, Danielle wrote:
It's becoming increasingly popular for potential employers and other interviewers (including academic) to monitor your online activity. While it's common knowledge that most applicants are Googled and searched on social networks when applying for a job, in cases where they cannot be found, employers are putting them on the spot during the interview. They used to request social media passwords; now they ask to "shoulder surf" as more privacy laws against password demands have come into play. Essentially they ask you to log-in and then read over your shoulder. They want to be able to see your social networking pages/messages even if your privacy settings are "hidden" from view.

Thoughts? I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.

I wouldn't allow it. But then again, I also don't maintain a social media presence other than an anonymous reddit and this.
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YYW
Posts: 36,335
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7/19/2016 2:17:28 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
Basically, the issue is this:

If your employer wants into your private life, the question you have to ask is whether that's a place that's going to be a suitable environment to work in.
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I_Wanna_Rawk
Posts: 480
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7/19/2016 2:33:26 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
The only thing close to social media that I have is a debate.irg account... XD
Anyway, if my political opinions are that important to any company hiring me, well, they can find someone else.
Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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7/19/2016 3:08:23 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
The issue is this: it's illegal to discriminate on the basis of sex, race, religion, national origin and color in job employment. You also can't discriminate based on disability. In many states, it's illegal to discriminate based on gender, sexuality, age, etc. Employers cannot legally ask you about these things on a job interview. Yet by having access to your Facebook page, they would see this information which could be problematic. Your Facebook also reveals things about your personal life and politics. Sure, your boss can fire or not hire you for ANY reason (outside of the elements listed in the Civil Rights Act , ADA and other statutes ), however, people also have a reasonable right to privacy and freedom of association. The lines are very blurry for sure. It's a really interesting legal debate.
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Danielle
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7/19/2016 3:10:03 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
Also, it would be illegal for someone to ask to sift through your mail. However this shoulder surfing policy allows people to read your e-mails. I also get the tendency for people here to say "I wouldn't let them do it; I would walk out" but I'm curious if that would be the case if you really wanted/needed the job. Anyway, I would probably do the same... actually I wouldn't; I would direct them to my "fake" i.e. super moderate and mild Facebook page that I don't use much and that doesn't reveal anything problematic (I don't think).
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Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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7/19/2016 3:52:04 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 2:16:17 PM, YYW wrote:

Some people believe employers have a legitimate right to know about the character of their potential employees, and not just the front they put up on a job interview. This is not only to assess their "fit" within the organization, but also for liability reasons. If this person has lied about their work history, bad mouths former employers, shares trade secrets, cannot speak / write articulately, or otherwise acts maliciously toward others, employers think that's good information to have (btw-- I am aware of the counter-arguments; I'm just playing Devil's Advocate). Feel free to share your thoughts. And consider there was also research that proved people's Facebook profiles were better indicators of their job fit, performance, and even academic success than were grades and transcripts.
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FaustianJustice
Posts: 6,235
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7/19/2016 4:16:49 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 3:52:04 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 7/19/2016 2:16:17 PM, YYW wrote:

Some people believe employers have a legitimate right to know about the character of their potential employees, and not just the front they put up on a job interview.

Will the employer be paying for the character of said employee's personal time?

This is not only to assess their "fit" within the organization, but also for liability reasons. If this person has lied about their work history,

Generally verifiable without the employee giving personal info...

bad mouths former employers,

Google/FB search would reveal that, the prospective employee need not divulge.

shares trade secrets,

"Reason for denial of unemployment", also something the prospective need not be questioned about.

cannot speak / write articulately,

Don't need to look at FB for that.

or otherwise acts maliciously toward others,

Subjective context.

employers think that's good information to have (btw-- I am aware of the counter-arguments; I'm just playing Devil's Advocate). Feel free to share your thoughts. And consider there was also research that proved people's Facebook profiles were better indicators of their job fit, performance, and even academic success than were grades and transcripts.
Here we have an advocate for Islamic arranged marriages demonstrating that children can consent to sex.
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FaustianJustice
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7/19/2016 5:51:34 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 5:39:41 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 7/19/2016 4:16:49 PM, FaustianJustice wrote:

Okay... so do you think it should be legal or not?

Yup. No shoulder surfing, no asking to log in. Whatever is posted publicly is already fair game, that should be enough.
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Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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7/19/2016 5:55:43 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 5:51:34 PM, FaustianJustice wrote:
Yup. No shoulder surfing, no asking to log in. Whatever is posted publicly is already fair game, that should be enough.

You're seemingly contradicting yourself. I'm asking if you think it should be legal for an employer to ask for passwords or to shoulder surf during an interview. You said "Yup" which was immediately followed by "no shoulder surfing, no asking to log in." So do you believe it should be legal to shoulder surf?
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FaustianJustice
Posts: 6,235
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7/19/2016 6:13:47 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 5:55:43 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 7/19/2016 5:51:34 PM, FaustianJustice wrote:
Yup. No shoulder surfing, no asking to log in. Whatever is posted publicly is already fair game, that should be enough.

You're seemingly contradicting yourself. I'm asking if you think it should be legal for an employer to ask for passwords or to shoulder surf during an interview. You said "Yup" which was immediately followed by "no shoulder surfing, no asking to log in." So do you believe it should be legal to shoulder surf?

I had "illegal" in my head, as in "should it be illegal". Sorry for the confusion, I did not read the post carefully.
Here we have an advocate for Islamic arranged marriages demonstrating that children can consent to sex.
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Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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7/19/2016 6:17:08 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 6:13:47 PM, FaustianJustice wrote:
I had "illegal" in my head, as in "should it be illegal". Sorry for the confusion, I did not read the post carefully.

No worries. Thanks for your feedback :) I think it should be legal but highly discouraged.
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FaustianJustice
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7/19/2016 6:25:07 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 6:17:08 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 7/19/2016 6:13:47 PM, FaustianJustice wrote:
I had "illegal" in my head, as in "should it be illegal". Sorry for the confusion, I did not read the post carefully.

No worries. Thanks for your feedback :) I think it should be legal but highly discouraged.

My question to that would be "Why do you need the prospective employee's password/Log in info?"

Anything the company is worried about should already be public.
Here we have an advocate for Islamic arranged marriages demonstrating that children can consent to sex.
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YYW
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7/19/2016 7:22:17 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 3:52:04 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 7/19/2016 2:16:17 PM, YYW wrote:

Some people believe employers have a legitimate right to know about the character of their potential employees, and not just the front they put up on a job interview. This is not only to assess their "fit" within the organization, but also for liability reasons.

There is no legitimate interest an employer has in invading the private life of any employee unless the job is one which requires a background check. A teacher of school age children, for example, is such a job.

If this person has lied about their work history, bad mouths former employers, shares trade secrets, cannot speak / write articulately, or otherwise acts maliciously toward others, employers think that's good information to have (btw-- I am aware of the counter-arguments; I'm just playing Devil's Advocate).

That information does not come from social media. It comes from, among other sources, personnel files at previous places of employment, background checks, and certain kinds of interviews.

Feel free to share your thoughts. And consider there was also research that proved people's Facebook profiles were better indicators of their job fit, performance, and even academic success than were grades and transcripts.

The issue of whether an employer should be able to view information which is available to the public is different than the question you are asking. I have no problem with employers viewing information which people connect to their real identities and knowingly expose to the world. Anything beyond that, for example, information which could not be obtained without an employer's access to employee's personal social media accounts (I.e. That which you have to have a password to see) is extremely unethical for any employer to ask for. It is plausible grounds, even, for a hostile workplace lawsuit, among other means of legal recourse.
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Danielle
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7/19/2016 7:43:46 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 7:22:17 PM, YYW wrote:
There is no legitimate interest an employer has in invading the private life of any employee unless the job is one which requires a background check. A teacher of school age children, for example, is such a job.

So you don't believe a business owner has the right to discriminate in employment at all?

That information does not come from social media. It comes from, among other sources, personnel files at previous places of employment, background checks, and certain kinds of interviews.

Most companies don't share info from your personnel file. Also, many employers don't know the employee is doing this. And people have been caught doing it.

The issue of whether an employer should be able to view information which is available to the public is different than the question you are asking. I have no problem with employers viewing information which people connect to their real identities and knowingly expose to the world. Anything beyond that, for example, information which could not be obtained without an employer's access to employee's personal social media accounts (I.e. That which you have to have a password to see) is extremely unethical for any employer to ask for. It is plausible grounds, even, for a hostile workplace lawsuit, among other means of legal recourse.

Thank you for your insight. That's what I was asking. It's a heated legal contention because technically, employers are allowed to discriminate for any and every reason outside the parameters set up by the Civil Rights Act and ADA (or additional statutes by state). A libertarian or free-market enthusiast would also most likely agree with the business owner's right to discriminate as well, for any reason. And if the employee didn't want to share their info, the libertarian might say "okay, too bad, then move along in your job search." It's a very liberal position to say the government should protect people with these labor laws. Not many people on DDO are liberal, hence the discussion.

Consider the fact that employers can run your credit score. They think it gives insight to your level of responsibility (similar for grades). So you can see why some people would think social media scans are permissible.
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F-16_Fighting_Falcon
Posts: 18,324
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7/19/2016 8:01:56 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM, Danielle wrote:
It's becoming increasingly popular for potential employers and other interviewers (including academic) to monitor your online activity. While it's common knowledge that most applicants are Googled and searched on social networks when applying for a job, in cases where they cannot be found, employers are putting them on the spot during the interview. They used to request social media passwords; now they ask to "shoulder surf" as more privacy laws against password demands have come into play. Essentially they ask you to log-in and then read over your shoulder. They want to be able to see your social networking pages/messages even if your privacy settings are "hidden" from view.

Thoughts? I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.

Shoulder surfing should be made illegal.

In interactions between businesses of sufficient size and individuals, the businesses often have a lot more leverage. We can argue that the job applicant can simply seek a job elsewhere but we know that's not really comparable. If a large business doesn't hire an applicatnt, it's no big deal for them but an individual's livelihood depends on finding work. There's also the fact that if most businesses start doing it, an individual who doesn't want to expose his private life won't be able to find a job. While he or she could refuse to allow shoulder-surfing, that just means they won't get a job which again ties back into my point about leverage.

Society is perfectly entitled to unify and tilt the scales back in their favor. Labor Unions do this. The minimum wage does this. Laws against discrimination based on race, sex, religion, etc do this. There are laws that prevent businesses from discriminating against a whole slew of categories and there are several interview questions that are inappropriate. If you think there is no such thing as an inapprpriate or illegal interview question, that's a whole different discussion. If you think that some interview questions are inappropriate, then our argument becomes that I think shoulder-surfing is one of them. I'm not sure what your position is there though so I'll leave it at that.
Danielle
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7/19/2016 8:15:35 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 8:01:56 PM, F-16_Fighting_Falcon wrote:
There are laws that prevent businesses from discriminating against a whole slew of categories and there are several interview questions that are inappropriate. If you think there is no such thing as an inappropriate or illegal interview question, that's a whole different discussion.

The categories are outlined in the Civil Rights Act and ADA. Some states have additional statutes as well which I've mentioned (like age and sexuality). Beyond that, not many categories are protected. You can pretty much be fired or not hired for any reason. You can be turned down for having brown eyes, liking pizza or being an only child.

I'm not sure what your position is there though so I'll leave it at that.

I've said that I think it should be legal for businesses to discriminate (and shoulder surf) though significantly discouraged.

Thanks for your input! I was curious since most people on DDO seem conservative/libertarian which usually sides with the business.
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Greyparrot
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7/20/2016 12:44:21 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:02:35 AM, Danielle wrote:
At 7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM, Danielle wrote:
I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.

(I'm one of them...)

I think it would be hard to ban social media when employers have the right to call references (another aspect of social media).
Greyparrot
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7/20/2016 12:49:57 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:17:29 AM, Danielle wrote:

Do you think employers should legally be allowed to do this?

Also, it's not like the prospective employer is initiating any force. The candidate always has a choice to refuse and walk away. If there is a ban on some things an employer can demand as a condition of employment, where does it end? Will job placement eventually become a right at some point where the employer cannot demand anything? Prohibiting American employers from selectively hiring must surely lead to eventual insolvency in a competitive market of global employers.
bluesteel
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7/20/2016 1:10:43 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 4:01:02 AM, Danielle wrote:
It's becoming increasingly popular for potential employers and other interviewers (including academic) to monitor your online activity. While it's common knowledge that most applicants are Googled and searched on social networks when applying for a job, in cases where they cannot be found, employers are putting them on the spot during the interview. They used to request social media passwords; now they ask to "shoulder surf" as more privacy laws against password demands have come into play. Essentially they ask you to log-in and then read over your shoulder. They want to be able to see your social networking pages/messages even if your privacy settings are "hidden" from view.

Thoughts? I thought this would be an interesting topic for the "Businesses can do whatever they want! Fvck the Civil Rights Act!" people.

To me, this feels like an invasion of privacy akin to asking a job interviewee to strip naked for inspection. In many ways, I feel like asking for my Facebook password is more invasive than asking me to strip naked because my body is just my body; I sometimes share the deepest, darkest secrets of my mind on Facebook messenger and you're asking to see that?

The only time I would be comfortable with them asking to see a public profile is if the job has something to do with public relations and they want to see how you present yourself to the world. But asking to see a profile page is one thing. Asking to read PM's is *next level.*

Also, not entirely clear that this is legal. This may be an intrusion on seclusion, in states that recognize the tort. And this may raise an inference of employment discrimination if physical or mental illnesses are discovered via this method and then the candidate is not hired.

(Super interesting discussion topic though).
You can't reason someone out of a position they didn't reason themselves into - Jonathan Swift (paraphrase)
YYW
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7/20/2016 1:14:56 AM
Posted: 4 months ago
At 7/19/2016 7:43:46 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 7/19/2016 7:22:17 PM, YYW wrote:
There is no legitimate interest an employer has in invading the private life of any employee unless the job is one which requires a background check. A teacher of school age children, for example, is such a job.

So you don't believe a business owner has the right to discriminate in employment at all?

That is not what I said, nor is it even close to what I said.

That information does not come from social media. It comes from, among other sources, personnel files at previous places of employment, background checks, and certain kinds of interviews.

Most companies don't share info from your personnel file. Also, many employers don't know the employee is doing this. And people have been caught doing it.

Getting a waiver as to a personnel file is entirely possible, if a new company wanted it. Waivers with respect to information of that kind are common in some industries.

The issue of whether an employer should be able to view information which is available to the public is different than the question you are asking. I have no problem with employers viewing information which people connect to their real identities and knowingly expose to the world. Anything beyond that, for example, information which could not be obtained without an employer's access to employee's personal social media accounts (I.e. That which you have to have a password to see) is extremely unethical for any employer to ask for. It is plausible grounds, even, for a hostile workplace lawsuit, among other means of legal recourse.

Thank you for your insight. That's what I was asking. It's a heated legal contention because technically, employers are allowed to discriminate for any and every reason outside the parameters set up by the Civil Rights Act and ADA (or additional statutes by state).

It's more complicated than that.

A libertarian or free-market enthusiast would also most likely agree with the business owner's right to discriminate as well, for any reason. And if the employee didn't want to share their info, the libertarian might say "okay, too bad, then move along in your job search." It's a very liberal position to say the government should protect people with these labor laws. Not many people on DDO are liberal, hence the discussion.

Consider the fact that employers can run your credit score. They think it gives insight to your level of responsibility (similar for grades). So you can see why some people would think social media scans are permissible.

Consider what a credit score is. Consider what a social media profile is. Consider the differences between them.

I'll tell you this...

If an employer wanted to "shoulder surf" or whatever, or wanted social media access, that is not a company that is going to remain in business for long. There are potentially strong legal implications to a policy like that as well. But the point remains that a policy of that kind makes the workplace one that is inhospitable, at best. It is also the kind of place that anyone under 35 is going to balk at. The implication is that no new talent will work there, and the best talent will never work there.

Imagine the PR nightmare now. That would be on the front page of reddit, and would make the company's data a prime target for certain organizations as a result. Maybe. Or maybe it would just create mass outcry. It's an idiotic policy that any competent HR person would never allow to be adopted, and, if any HR person proposed an idea like that... let's just say it would hurt their career at any entity I worked at.

There is a balance that employers have to attain: you want competent and stable people, but you only want to reach as deep as you have too in order to do that. Go too far, and your employees are going to hate and resent you. An employee, even a properly vetted one whose background check jumped through all the hoops, who hates his or her employer or individually resents policies that the company has, is the biggest threat to any company's data security.

That's why your focus here is totally misguided, if, for example, your objective is to protect data. If you want to protect data, then you make sure your employees are loyal to the company. One way to do that is to avoid things that make employees disloyal to the company. An example of a kind of policy that would make an employee disloyal to a company would include a policy of requiring access of any kind to an employee's social media, or otherwise invading employee's private lives. An idea like that, implemented by a busy body HR person, would literally threaten the company.

Part of this is psychology, part of it is just common sense. Your policies cannot make people hate you. If your policies make people hate you, you're going to have a bad time. It's not about employer's rights (as per your earlier mention), it's about not being stupid.
Tsar of DDO