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"Pig"

R0b1Billion
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9/3/2016 12:17:43 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
While Colin Kaepernick has recently brought this term to the headlines, I have for some time been interested in learning the etymology of the word "pig" as applied metaphorically to people. I read Animal Farm recently, a novel from Orwell about farm animals which free themselves from the bonds of humans only to eventually become slaves to the pigs on the farm, and the last sentence of the book says it all: "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." Although there are murmurings on the internet of the term being used before Orwell, it would seem he was the prime impetus going forward to use the metaphor to describe authorities.

The first time I heard the term "pig," I remember a distinct confusion. I was watching Sylvester Stallone's "Cobra" as a small child and the villain calls the cops "pigs" several times during the movie. Shortly after, the 90s ushered in the era of gangsta rap and I was thoroughly saturated with the term. It wasn't until I heard Nine Inch Nails' "March of the Pigs" that I realized there was a juicier concept behind the term than simply bigotry. It would seem the term is also applied to the rich and powerful ("capitalist pigs") as well as the socially-ignorant (I would imagine Trent Reznor would no doubt apply the term to the current Trump-supporting movement, and perhaps to many Hillary-supporters as well).

What is a pig to you? Do you recognize meaning in the metaphor, or do you find it simply hateful? Based on my experiences with the concept, a pig to me is a person who enjoys a position of wealth or power but does not recognize the privilege they have and the corresponding responsibility to handle it morally. This could include a police officer who, for example, abuses the privileges of his badge. It could include the rich, but probably includes even the not-so-rich in this country because even the lower middle-class enjoys many luxuries we take for granted. Instead of taking a step back and saying "wow, look at all I have compared to somebody in Haiti," we instead look out and see only those with more privilege than us and feel stepped-on and disenfranchised. We put way too much stock in material possessions and are even fattened as pigs are, soft and round and all-consuming.
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
intellectuallyprimitive
Posts: 1,000
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9/3/2016 12:33:29 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
I thought it was merely a comparison given that pigs are often viewed as filthier animals and aesthetically unappealing, hence it is employed disdainfully.

Imagine police officers being taunted with phrases such as, "you damn lions need to start doing your job!"
Or:
"Why don't you stallions stop harassing tax paying citizens?"

Just replace lions and stallions with pigs and there you have it.
Throwback
Posts: 421
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9/3/2016 2:07:13 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 12:17:43 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
While Colin Kaepernick has recently brought this term to the headlines, I have for some time been interested in learning the etymology of the word "pig" as applied metaphorically to people. I read Animal Farm recently, a novel from Orwell about farm animals which free themselves from the bonds of humans only to eventually become slaves to the pigs on the farm, and the last sentence of the book says it all: "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." Although there are murmurings on the internet of the term being used before Orwell, it would seem he was the prime impetus going forward to use the metaphor to describe authorities.

The first time I heard the term "pig," I remember a distinct confusion. I was watching Sylvester Stallone's "Cobra" as a small child and the villain calls the cops "pigs" several times during the movie. Shortly after, the 90s ushered in the era of gangsta rap and I was thoroughly saturated with the term. It wasn't until I heard Nine Inch Nails' "March of the Pigs" that I realized there was a juicier concept behind the term than simply bigotry. It would seem the term is also applied to the rich and powerful ("capitalist pigs") as well as the socially-ignorant (I would imagine Trent Reznor would no doubt apply the term to the current Trump-supporting movement, and perhaps to many Hillary-supporters as well).

What is a pig to you? Do you recognize meaning in the metaphor, or do you find it simply hateful? Based on my experiences with the concept, a pig to me is a person who enjoys a position of wealth or power but does not recognize the privilege they have and the corresponding responsibility to handle it morally. This could include a police officer who, for example, abuses the privileges of his badge. It could include the rich, but probably includes even the not-so-rich in this country because even the lower middle-class enjoys many luxuries we take for granted. Instead of taking a step back and saying "wow, look at all I have compared to somebody in Haiti," we instead look out and see only those with more privilege than us and feel stepped-on and disenfranchised. We put way too much stock in material possessions and are even fattened as pigs are, soft and round and all-consuming.

I don't know the etymology, either. I only know it was an insult against us intended to enrage (it doesn't) long before I started, and that was in the 1980's.
When I respond with "OK" don't take it personally. I'm simply being appropriately dismissive.
R0b1Billion
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9/3/2016 2:30:52 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 12:33:29 AM, intellectuallyprimitive wrote:
I thought it was merely a comparison given that pigs are often viewed as filthier animals and aesthetically unappealing, hence it is employed disdainfully.

Imagine police officers being taunted with phrases such as, "you damn lions need to start doing your job!"
Or:
"Why don't you stallions stop harassing tax paying citizens?"

Just replace lions and stallions with pigs and there you have it.

Lol. As I said, I also once thought it was simply a base insult. But I started hearing it in more involved contexts.

I am, perhaps, simply making up a new word here. Some would say that our intelligence is based upon our vocabulary; each new word is a new idea, so you increase your capacity for ideas when you increase your vocabulary. Sometimes I get frustrated with the capacity of our language and wish to create new ideas which have no words. This is essentially what is happening here; there is an idea which has no word and I am using whatever language I can to describe it. Orwell's pigs, Reznor's pigs, and hip-hop's pigs are all chipping away at a concept that should have a word but doesn't and unfortunately probably never will.
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
R0b1Billion
Posts: 3,733
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9/3/2016 2:31:49 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 2:07:13 AM, Throwback wrote:
At 9/3/2016 12:17:43 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
While Colin Kaepernick has recently brought this term to the headlines, I have for some time been interested in learning the etymology of the word "pig" as applied metaphorically to people. I read Animal Farm recently, a novel from Orwell about farm animals which free themselves from the bonds of humans only to eventually become slaves to the pigs on the farm, and the last sentence of the book says it all: "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." Although there are murmurings on the internet of the term being used before Orwell, it would seem he was the prime impetus going forward to use the metaphor to describe authorities.

The first time I heard the term "pig," I remember a distinct confusion. I was watching Sylvester Stallone's "Cobra" as a small child and the villain calls the cops "pigs" several times during the movie. Shortly after, the 90s ushered in the era of gangsta rap and I was thoroughly saturated with the term. It wasn't until I heard Nine Inch Nails' "March of the Pigs" that I realized there was a juicier concept behind the term than simply bigotry. It would seem the term is also applied to the rich and powerful ("capitalist pigs") as well as the socially-ignorant (I would imagine Trent Reznor would no doubt apply the term to the current Trump-supporting movement, and perhaps to many Hillary-supporters as well).

What is a pig to you? Do you recognize meaning in the metaphor, or do you find it simply hateful? Based on my experiences with the concept, a pig to me is a person who enjoys a position of wealth or power but does not recognize the privilege they have and the corresponding responsibility to handle it morally. This could include a police officer who, for example, abuses the privileges of his badge. It could include the rich, but probably includes even the not-so-rich in this country because even the lower middle-class enjoys many luxuries we take for granted. Instead of taking a step back and saying "wow, look at all I have compared to somebody in Haiti," we instead look out and see only those with more privilege than us and feel stepped-on and disenfranchised. We put way too much stock in material possessions and are even fattened as pigs are, soft and round and all-consuming.

I don't know the etymology, either. I only know it was an insult against us intended to enrage (it doesn't) long before I started, and that was in the 1980's.

Are you a police officer?
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Throwback
Posts: 421
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9/3/2016 2:43:33 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 2:31:49 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 9/3/2016 2:07:13 AM, Throwback wrote:
At 9/3/2016 12:17:43 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
While Colin Kaepernick has recently brought this term to the headlines, I have for some time been interested in learning the etymology of the word "pig" as applied metaphorically to people. I read Animal Farm recently, a novel from Orwell about farm animals which free themselves from the bonds of humans only to eventually become slaves to the pigs on the farm, and the last sentence of the book says it all: "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." Although there are murmurings on the internet of the term being used before Orwell, it would seem he was the prime impetus going forward to use the metaphor to describe authorities.

The first time I heard the term "pig," I remember a distinct confusion. I was watching Sylvester Stallone's "Cobra" as a small child and the villain calls the cops "pigs" several times during the movie. Shortly after, the 90s ushered in the era of gangsta rap and I was thoroughly saturated with the term. It wasn't until I heard Nine Inch Nails' "March of the Pigs" that I realized there was a juicier concept behind the term than simply bigotry. It would seem the term is also applied to the rich and powerful ("capitalist pigs") as well as the socially-ignorant (I would imagine Trent Reznor would no doubt apply the term to the current Trump-supporting movement, and perhaps to many Hillary-supporters as well).

What is a pig to you? Do you recognize meaning in the metaphor, or do you find it simply hateful? Based on my experiences with the concept, a pig to me is a person who enjoys a position of wealth or power but does not recognize the privilege they have and the corresponding responsibility to handle it morally. This could include a police officer who, for example, abuses the privileges of his badge. It could include the rich, but probably includes even the not-so-rich in this country because even the lower middle-class enjoys many luxuries we take for granted. Instead of taking a step back and saying "wow, look at all I have compared to somebody in Haiti," we instead look out and see only those with more privilege than us and feel stepped-on and disenfranchised. We put way too much stock in material possessions and are even fattened as pigs are, soft and round and all-consuming.

I don't know the etymology, either. I only know it was an insult against us intended to enrage (it doesn't) long before I started, and that was in the 1980's.

Are you a police officer?

Well, I was, but I got too old to charge into 3 a.m. bar fights.
When I respond with "OK" don't take it personally. I'm simply being appropriately dismissive.
R0b1Billion
Posts: 3,733
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9/3/2016 2:47:04 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 1:59:43 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
https://www.youtube.com...

https://www.youtube.com...

I should have known pink Floyd would have words on the subject! I'm not familiar with these songs. I think they resonate with my points though...
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
1harderthanyouthink
Posts: 13,107
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9/3/2016 2:49:48 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 2:47:04 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 9/3/2016 1:59:43 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
https://www.youtube.com...

https://www.youtube.com...

I should have known pink Floyd would have words on the subject! I'm not familiar with these songs. I think they resonate with my points though...

Indeed. The pig is just the negative people in life - and the album is loosely based on Orwell's book, too.
"It's awfully considerate of you to think of me here,
And I'm much obliged to you for making it clear - that I'm not here."

-Syd Barrett

DDO Risk King
R0b1Billion
Posts: 3,733
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9/3/2016 2:51:48 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 2:43:33 AM, Throwback wrote:
At 9/3/2016 2:31:49 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 9/3/2016 2:07:13 AM, Throwback wrote:
At 9/3/2016 12:17:43 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
While Colin Kaepernick has recently brought this term to the headlines, I have for some time been interested in learning the etymology of the word "pig" as applied metaphorically to people. I read Animal Farm recently, a novel from Orwell about farm animals which free themselves from the bonds of humans only to eventually become slaves to the pigs on the farm, and the last sentence of the book says it all: "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." Although there are murmurings on the internet of the term being used before Orwell, it would seem he was the prime impetus going forward to use the metaphor to describe authorities.

The first time I heard the term "pig," I remember a distinct confusion. I was watching Sylvester Stallone's "Cobra" as a small child and the villain calls the cops "pigs" several times during the movie. Shortly after, the 90s ushered in the era of gangsta rap and I was thoroughly saturated with the term. It wasn't until I heard Nine Inch Nails' "March of the Pigs" that I realized there was a juicier concept behind the term than simply bigotry. It would seem the term is also applied to the rich and powerful ("capitalist pigs") as well as the socially-ignorant (I would imagine Trent Reznor would no doubt apply the term to the current Trump-supporting movement, and perhaps to many Hillary-supporters as well).

What is a pig to you? Do you recognize meaning in the metaphor, or do you find it simply hateful? Based on my experiences with the concept, a pig to me is a person who enjoys a position of wealth or power but does not recognize the privilege they have and the corresponding responsibility to handle it morally. This could include a police officer who, for example, abuses the privileges of his badge. It could include the rich, but probably includes even the not-so-rich in this country because even the lower middle-class enjoys many luxuries we take for granted. Instead of taking a step back and saying "wow, look at all I have compared to somebody in Haiti," we instead look out and see only those with more privilege than us and feel stepped-on and disenfranchised. We put way too much stock in material possessions and are even fattened as pigs are, soft and round and all-consuming.

I don't know the etymology, either. I only know it was an insult against us intended to enrage (it doesn't) long before I started, and that was in the 1980's.

Are you a police officer?

Well, I was, but I got too old to charge into 3 a.m. bar fights.

Well I'm glad to hear you are not offended, the way morality and psychology work, I would think that that means you are in fact not the type of person who fits the desriptions i have made!
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Throwback
Posts: 421
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9/3/2016 3:07:57 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 2:51:48 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 9/3/2016 2:43:33 AM, Throwback wrote:
At 9/3/2016 2:31:49 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 9/3/2016 2:07:13 AM, Throwback wrote:
At 9/3/2016 12:17:43 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
While Colin Kaepernick has recently brought this term to the headlines, I have for some time been interested in learning the etymology of the word "pig" as applied metaphorically to people. I read Animal Farm recently, a novel from Orwell about farm animals which free themselves from the bonds of humans only to eventually become slaves to the pigs on the farm, and the last sentence of the book says it all: "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." Although there are murmurings on the internet of the term being used before Orwell, it would seem he was the prime impetus going forward to use the metaphor to describe authorities.

The first time I heard the term "pig," I remember a distinct confusion. I was watching Sylvester Stallone's "Cobra" as a small child and the villain calls the cops "pigs" several times during the movie. Shortly after, the 90s ushered in the era of gangsta rap and I was thoroughly saturated with the term. It wasn't until I heard Nine Inch Nails' "March of the Pigs" that I realized there was a juicier concept behind the term than simply bigotry. It would seem the term is also applied to the rich and powerful ("capitalist pigs") as well as the socially-ignorant (I would imagine Trent Reznor would no doubt apply the term to the current Trump-supporting movement, and perhaps to many Hillary-supporters as well).

What is a pig to you? Do you recognize meaning in the metaphor, or do you find it simply hateful? Based on my experiences with the concept, a pig to me is a person who enjoys a position of wealth or power but does not recognize the privilege they have and the corresponding responsibility to handle it morally. This could include a police officer who, for example, abuses the privileges of his badge. It could include the rich, but probably includes even the not-so-rich in this country because even the lower middle-class enjoys many luxuries we take for granted. Instead of taking a step back and saying "wow, look at all I have compared to somebody in Haiti," we instead look out and see only those with more privilege than us and feel stepped-on and disenfranchised. We put way too much stock in material possessions and are even fattened as pigs are, soft and round and all-consuming.

I don't know the etymology, either. I only know it was an insult against us intended to enrage (it doesn't) long before I started, and that was in the 1980's.

Are you a police officer?

Well, I was, but I got too old to charge into 3 a.m. bar fights.

Well I'm glad to hear you are not offended, the way morality and psychology work, I would think that that means you are in fact not the type of person who fits the desriptions i have made!

I'm probably not the type, but you might get a different opinion from the guys who lost those bar fights :) . It was good fun. Getting old is a downer!
When I respond with "OK" don't take it personally. I'm simply being appropriately dismissive.
Fatihah
Posts: 7,770
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9/3/2016 3:09:59 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 12:17:43 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
While Colin Kaepernick has recently brought this term to the headlines, I have for some time been interested in learning the etymology of the word "pig" as applied metaphorically to people. I read Animal Farm recently, a novel from Orwell about farm animals which free themselves from the bonds of humans only to eventually become slaves to the pigs on the farm, and the last sentence of the book says it all: "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." Although there are murmurings on the internet of the term being used before Orwell, it would seem he was the prime impetus going forward to use the metaphor to describe authorities.

The first time I heard the term "pig," I remember a distinct confusion. I was watching Sylvester Stallone's "Cobra" as a small child and the villain calls the cops "pigs" several times during the movie. Shortly after, the 90s ushered in the era of gangsta rap and I was thoroughly saturated with the term. It wasn't until I heard Nine Inch Nails' "March of the Pigs" that I realized there was a juicier concept behind the term than simply bigotry. It would seem the term is also applied to the rich and powerful ("capitalist pigs") as well as the socially-ignorant (I would imagine Trent Reznor would no doubt apply the term to the current Trump-supporting movement, and perhaps to many Hillary-supporters as well).

What is a pig to you? Do you recognize meaning in the metaphor, or do you find it simply hateful? Based on my experiences with the concept, a pig to me is a person who enjoys a position of wealth or power but does not recognize the privilege they have and the corresponding responsibility to handle it morally. This could include a police officer who, for example, abuses the privileges of his badge. It could include the rich, but probably includes even the not-so-rich in this country because even the lower middle-class enjoys many luxuries we take for granted. Instead of taking a step back and saying "wow, look at all I have compared to somebody in Haiti," we instead look out and see only those with more privilege than us and feel stepped-on and disenfranchised. We put way too much stock in material possessions and are even fattened as pigs are, soft and round and all-consuming.

Response: The term "pig" in reference to cops was started by the Black Panther party in the 60's. That is how black people in America know and use the term Pig. Since a Pig is a nasty animal and they hated the white racist police, they called them Pigs. They even had a song:

"you gotta go now,
oink, oink, bang, bang, hey pig
Piggy wiggy, oh piggy wiggy I said...

(repeat over again).
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,337
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9/3/2016 10:11:26 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 12:17:43 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
While Colin Kaepernick has recently brought this term to the headlines, I have for some time been interested in learning the etymology of the word "pig" as applied metaphorically to people. I read Animal Farm recently, a novel from Orwell about farm animals which free themselves from the bonds of humans only to eventually become slaves to the pigs on the farm, and the last sentence of the book says it all: "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which." Although there are murmurings on the internet of the term being used before Orwell, it would seem he was the prime impetus going forward to use the metaphor to describe authorities.

The first time I heard the term "pig," I remember a distinct confusion. I was watching Sylvester Stallone's "Cobra" as a small child and the villain calls the cops "pigs" several times during the movie. Shortly after, the 90s ushered in the era of gangsta rap and I was thoroughly saturated with the term. It wasn't until I heard Nine Inch Nails' "March of the Pigs" that I realized there was a juicier concept behind the term than simply bigotry. It would seem the term is also applied to the rich and powerful ("capitalist pigs") as well as the socially-ignorant (I would imagine Trent Reznor would no doubt apply the term to the current Trump-supporting movement, and perhaps to many Hillary-supporters as well).

What is a pig to you? Do you recognize meaning in the metaphor, or do you find it simply hateful? Based on my experiences with the concept, a pig to me is a person who enjoys a position of wealth or power but does not recognize the privilege they have and the corresponding responsibility to handle it morally. This could include a police officer who, for example, abuses the privileges of his badge. It could include the rich, but probably includes even the not-so-rich in this country because even the lower middle-class enjoys many luxuries we take for granted. Instead of taking a step back and saying "wow, look at all I have compared to somebody in Haiti," we instead look out and see only those with more privilege than us and feel stepped-on and disenfranchised. We put way too much stock in material possessions and are even fattened as pigs are, soft and round and all-consuming.

In the orwellian sense..pigs are BLM.....once slaves, now carriers of the liberal whip in the same image of their masters.
Rosalie
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9/3/2016 10:13:47 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
Egocentric men.
" We need more videos of cat's playing the piano on the internet" - My art professor.

"Criticism is easier to take when you realize that the only people who aren't criticized are those who don't take risks." - Donald Trump
R0b1Billion
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9/4/2016 3:03:45 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 10:11:26 PM, Greyparrot wrote:

In the orwellian sense..pigs are BLM.....once slaves, now carriers of the liberal whip in the same image of their masters.

Fascinating. But if we are going to look at blacks, wouldn't we look more at the pop/rap culture blacks with the flashy materialism and emulation of Italian gangsters? I guess I just don't recognize how the BLM is oppressive of blacks...
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Greyparrot
Posts: 14,337
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9/4/2016 3:08:39 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/4/2016 3:03:45 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 9/3/2016 10:11:26 PM, Greyparrot wrote:

In the orwellian sense..pigs are BLM.....once slaves, now carriers of the liberal whip in the same image of their masters.

Fascinating. But if we are going to look at blacks, wouldn't we look more at the pop/rap culture blacks with the flashy materialism and emulation of Italian gangsters? I guess I just don't recognize how the BLM is oppressive of blacks...

No, BLM seeks special favors, just like the orwellian pigs did.

Reduced police brutality, but only for them.

Special consideration under the law and reparations, but only for them.
Greyparrot
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9/4/2016 3:10:21 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/4/2016 3:03:45 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
At 9/3/2016 10:11:26 PM, Greyparrot wrote:

In the orwellian sense..pigs are BLM.....once slaves, now carriers of the liberal whip in the same image of their masters.

Fascinating. But if we are going to look at blacks, wouldn't we look more at the pop/rap culture blacks with the flashy materialism and emulation of Italian gangsters? I guess I just don't recognize how the BLM is oppressive of blacks...

All Blacks are equal...but some Blacks are more equal than others...
R0b1Billion
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9/4/2016 3:22:34 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 9/3/2016 10:13:47 PM, Rosalie wrote:
Egocentric men.

All men and women are egocentric. It is the nature of intelligent beings, the balance which gives rise to their existence; you cannot have intelligence without ego. I believe this is the foundation of morality: one's ability to resist the ego.

With that rant aside, yes I agree with you wholeheartedly, although one will rarely find success singling out a specific gender of course. A pig is someone who has lost their balance between pride and humility. Between intelligence and ego. Between ability and responsibility.
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.