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Faking Injuries

Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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9/22/2011 10:53:20 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
The NFL sent a memo Wednesday to all 32 teams warning of fines, suspensions and loss of draft picks if the league determines players faked injuries during a game to avoid having to call a time out when it is determined that they need some extra time to regroup or want to stop the clock. Sam Bradford, the Rams QB, said that in Monday night's game against the Giants, it was obvious that they were just buying time with St. Louis running a no-huddle offense. "They couldn't get subbed, they couldn't line up," Bradford said. "Someone said, 'Someone go down, someone go down,' so someone just went down and grabbed a cramp."

It'll be interesting to see how people react to this going forward. Coaches readily admit advising players to do this if they think it will help. Of course it's unfair, but I feel if everyone does it (or has the opportunity to do it) then it's not exactly the worst thing in the world. Still, cheating is cheating. I wonder who will actually be penalized for this in the future, and if it will start happening less. We shall see!
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Ore_Ele
Posts: 25,980
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9/22/2011 11:33:25 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
Now rather than fakeing injuries, the players will keep shives on them so that they can cause a real injury when they need time. Doesn't the NFL know that if it tries to impose restrictions and regulations that it will only make things worse?!
"Wanting Red Rhino Pill to have gender"
Lasagna
Posts: 2,440
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9/22/2011 2:44:34 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I'm surprised it took this long to come out; it's always been curious to me how injured players can get a free time-out by hitting the deck. Perhaps we should make it harder for minor injuries to get this advantage...
Rob
BlackVoid
Posts: 9,170
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9/22/2011 5:40:27 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
My question is why action is being done in the NFL but not college? The no-huddle is used a lot more in the NCAA than the NFL, and fake injuries happen more often as a result.
Lasagna
Posts: 2,440
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9/22/2011 7:24:22 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
I just heard an analysis by a retired player and it explained a lot. Apparently, there is an intricate system in place to conduct fake injuries. It has it's own signaling, and players understand that during certain downs, certain players ought to take the fall (on an up-coming 3rd and short, for instance, you would sacrifice a pass-protector instead of a run-protector). He said it was an unfair advantage for the offense to control the tempo of the game so blatantly and that defenses often don't have the time they need to make proper substitutions.

I think they should give the defenses more power. First off, offense is getting out of control. Marino's single-season pass record has stood unchallenged since before most of you were born, yet it could be broken by several QBs this year. Brady will likely experience regression towards the mean, especially playing outdoors in bad weather at the end of the season, but if he keeps up this way he'll hit almost 150% of Marino's record.

Also, there's no way to determine if a player is faking cramps, so enforcing this rule is never going to work. There should be some ability for the defense to slow down the play for proper substitutions and reactions to the offense.
Rob
Lasagna
Posts: 2,440
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9/23/2011 12:09:54 PM
Posted: 5 years ago
And the plot thickens...

This from the Giants' Def Coordinator:

"I can't say I've ever done that and I can't say that I haven't done that," Fewell said Thursday. "... But I can't say I did and I can't say I've never done that. So I'm not gonna go back and forth about it."

It's beyond a reasonable doubt, now, that this is an established practice in most if not all of the 32 teams. Should the Giants suffer a draft pick because they were the ones that got caught? I would tend to say no, because the Giants simply had players THAT WERE EFFING STUPID and not only announced it to the other team before they did it, but did a terrible job acting it out. Before we use them as the league example, we should think about smart policies to implement to minimize the impact on the game. This is already being dubbed "drop-gate (lol)" but I think this isn't as bad as spy-gate because it's not as devious and obviously widely used around the league.
Rob
Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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9/24/2011 8:25:16 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
I agree with ya, Rob. Every team does it and the Giants' coach is not the only one to have admitted it. Also, it does kind of penalize the team utilizing it by removing one of their starting players, if even for a little bit. I think one possible solution (not sure how good it is) would be to suggest that a player who leaves the game injured be forced to sit out for a specific amount of time; say a quarter. I dunno how useful that would be in the last minutes of a game or quarter (which is when this tactic is used the most), but I dunno. Something along those lines perhaps.

Spygate is much worse IMO, because football is indeed a strategy game (that's how I defend my love of the NFL to everyone who makes fun of me for it, which I get a lot :P ). To spy on another team and pick apart their plays is a lot different then sacrificing a player to get a little bit of time to regroup, which theoretically both teams can even benefit from.
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Lasagna
Posts: 2,440
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9/24/2011 9:12:33 AM
Posted: 5 years ago
You don't think that perhaps, given the offense-happy scheme as of late, that the defense ought to just be given the ability to slow down the tempo in short durations just to be able to make adequate subs and get their bearings? Otherwise, this problem is likely to persist and despite the NFL's threats, there's no way they can pass a ruling saying "player x did not indeed cramp up on 2nd down during game y." It's a hollow threat and teams are going to make sure their players are more slick about it for now on.
Rob