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The End of the NFL?

imabench
Posts: 21,205
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2/13/2012 9:37:57 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/12/2012 5:01:51 PM, Lasagna wrote:
http://www.grantland.com...

Interesting take from ESPN.com

it ll really depends on how violent or frequent head injuries become, and whether or not families can get ridiculously absurd rewards for lawsuits (20 mil? greedy bastards)
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Lasagna
Posts: 2,440
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2/13/2012 10:20:19 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
It seems imminent; the scenarios they paint are all well within reason. It's really just a matter of time before things align right and it happens. And every season where we have episodes like the Colt McCoy incident, coupled with raging beasts like Suh and Harrison who barely even respect the rules, only makes that scenario all the more likely.
Rob
BlackVoid
Posts: 9,170
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2/14/2012 12:58:38 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
I think head injuries are at least being managed/limited by the new rules. The issue is that having to tackle low isn't much better. Players dont wear near as many pads on their legs as they go on their upper body, so forcing defenders to tackle there is just as risky. Eric Decker was knocked out in the Broncos' playoff game because Harrison tackled him on his legs. Instead of going for the head, people go for the knees, which are just as sensitive. If this scenario happens, It'd likely be due to a combinatioon of concussions and knee injuries, not just concussions.
theitalianstallion
Posts: 1,109
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2/14/2012 12:40:45 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
If it does happen, it will be later rather than sooner.

High school football is as strong as ever and college football will last as long as there is money to be made.
When Reach fell, I came.
Lasagna
Posts: 2,440
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2/14/2012 3:49:33 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/14/2012 12:40:45 PM, theitalianstallion wrote:
If it does happen, it will be later rather than sooner.

High school football is as strong as ever and college football will last as long as there is money to be made.

As they explain, it's not about demand, it's about liability. Even with demand at an all-time high, enough liability could destroy the sport.
Rob
Loserboi
Posts: 1,232
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2/15/2012 7:36:06 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I hate what the NFL has become with all these rules to protect offensive players. You knew the risks wen you joined the NFL, and you accepted millions of dollars for years in your career, knowing all the risks. The NFL is basically making defensive play extremely difficult, and offensive plays extremely easy. I like seeing hard hits, its one of the things that made the game extremely interesting. Now you talking about only attacking the legs?
Danielle
Posts: 21,330
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2/16/2012 2:34:57 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/14/2012 3:49:33 PM, Lasagna wrote:
As they explain, it's not about demand, it's about liability. Even with demand at an all-time high, enough liability could destroy the sport.

Notice how they didn't provide one useful example of this actually being a problem. They mentioned health care insurance, but that's a poor analogy. Insurance companies simply up their premiums which is presumably what would happen with football. Plus, I don't think that football players should be winning liability lawsuits. There is an element of responsibility when you choose to engage in a contact sport like this. That's like soldiers suing the army for enduring danger on the front lines. Duh.

In short, I think the demand is far too high for football to ever disappear. There would be a public outcry considering how ingrained football has become in American culture. Supply and demand will win out on this one. There's also the argument that other sports can be more dangerous, such as boxing, MMA and even basketball - a sport that causes more injuries than football. Interesting food for thought, but the article's premise is simply too far-fetched IMO.
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GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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2/16/2012 3:06:46 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 2/16/2012 2:34:57 PM, Danielle wrote:
At 2/14/2012 3:49:33 PM, Lasagna wrote:
Plus, I don't think that football players should be winning liability lawsuits. There is an element of responsibility when you choose to engage in a contact sport like this. That's like soldiers suing the army for enduring danger on the front lines. Duh.

In short, I think the demand is far too high for football to ever disappear. There would be a public outcry considering how ingrained football has become in American culture. Supply and demand will win out on this one. There's also the argument that other sports can be more dangerous, such as boxing, MMA and even basketball - a sport that causes more injuries than football. Interesting food for thought, but the article's premise is simply too far-fetched IMO.

MMA and basketball are safer than football.

Basketball: There might be more injuries, but they are less serious than football. Who gets concussions from basketball? You don't have 11 guys charging at you full speed trying to tackle you and then dogpile you. Plus collisions and sacks. Those are absent from basketball. The midair collisions in basketball happen within two feet of charging distance.

MMA: In UFC, the largest MMA franchise, there are about 30 rules to keep fighters safe. You can't kick a downed opponents head, etc. Plus, the ref stops the fight before a real knockout even happens hence why there are so many TKOs (technical knockouts) rather than KOs. KOs happen to but fighters immediately get right back up and are fine. Look at Santos knockout of Cain Velasquez. Dos Santos has some of the most devastating striking in heavy weight UFC and his full power punch to the side of Cains head left him in prefect health after the fight. MMA is painful and intense, but doesn't really damage people in the long term. Football and boxing do.

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Lasagna
Posts: 2,440
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2/16/2012 3:33:17 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
Loserboi: Who was that player from the 70s, kind of like the precursor to James Harrison, who pioneered these concussion rules in the first place? He had a saying... something like "there is no good way to tackle somebody below the eyebrows." Tapes show him grabbing runners by their heads and ripping them off their feet, bodyslamming them into the turf in a spectacularly violent display.

Now we have Harrison who is doing it once again, causing the NFL to adapt and try and make the game safer. I think of Plato and his "world of forms..." he envisioned that everything in the world has a perfect form in the heavens, and what we do on Earth is an imperfect copy. For the NFL, perhaps there is a perfect way to run the game, in which fan satisfaction, player safety, and fairness/challenge is maximized.

I would say that all these rules are starting to make the sport less enjoyable, even if the result is a higher scoring game. The Packers won 15 games this season, more than the Giants, by pretty much letting teams just run it into the redzone almost every drive. There is a new statistical approach being implemented in college by a certain coach who doesn't believe in punting anymore because the offense has such a high % of converting on 4th down (coupled by a low % of stopping them after the punt).

I'm starting to come around to your way of thinking, that this game is getting farther from what it was meant to be played like. One rule that is fundamental to tackling is that you don't hit the player in his knees. There is no excuse for that, because you can end his career so quickly and easily that way. But now players can't hit high either, so it's getting pretty ridiculous to tackle a juking offensive player right in the numbers every time.

Perhaps it's finally time to implement the 'no helmet' rule. Defensive players can't lead with their heads as easily without a helmet on, and by making them more sensitive to their own safety maybe we can get them to tackle truer and also be able to get rid of these high tackling bans. It's a lot harder to grab a player's head when he doesn't have a huge bubble helmet around it, and players can head-juke out of most tackles, making it naturally less viable to try that route.

Danielle: The article does point out well how other marquee sports have fell from the ranks and gives a good framework for how the lawsuits would work. Football really hasn't been that popular for very long; when I was a kid, baseball was way bigger than football and these NFL "stars" were playing in stadiums that resembled high school fields. It wasn't until the 90s baseball strike, coupled with the mega-dynasty Dallas Cowboys, that football started becoming the top dawg. The author assumes that even if football were to remain as popular as ever, lawsuits could still bring it down.
Rob