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Antivirus Software

JBlake
Posts: 4,634
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10/16/2008 5:55:47 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
Somjohn41,

You stated elsewhere that Norton is a terrible virus. I wonder what is so wrong with Norton? If it is so awful, what is a good replacement?

These questions can go to anyone, I just addressed John because he brought up the issue.
s0m31john
Posts: 1,879
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10/16/2008 6:03:13 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
Norton is a system resource hog, there's no getting around that. It hogs memory like there's no tomorrow and has like 5 processes always running in the background. Even then it gives mediocre protection and seems to cause more problems than it prevents.

I don't run antivirus software. Most of the times a person get's a virus because a PEBKAC (problem exists between keyboard and chair). As the saying goes, "there's no patch of human stupidity."

I will occasionally scan for spyware and viruses if there seems like something is wrong.

I used to recommend the lightweight version of AVG, but they've since gotten rid of that and now only offer a version full of bloat.

As for free software, I don't know any. Hell, I don't know any pay software that's not just bloatware.

If you feel you HAVE to have something, I'd recommend NOD32 or Kaspersky. Those two cost money though.
Ragnar_Rahl
Posts: 19,297
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10/16/2008 6:46:58 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
I got rid of Norton when I realized it wasn't gonna be free. Ran Avast! for a while, pissed me off when it started giving me OVER 9000 latency on WoW. Run Avira now, gives me annoying shareware popups once a day but it seems to work well enough, although it REALLY doesn't like the software I have for a math course.
It came to be at its height. It was commanded to command. It was a capital before its first stone was laid. It was a monument to the spirit of man.
josh_42
Posts: 17
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10/16/2008 8:27:19 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
Norton is a system resource hog, there's no getting around that. It hogs memory like there's no tomorrow and has like 5 processes always running in the background. Even then it gives mediocre protection and seems to cause more problems than it prevents.:

Not to mention Norton gets deep into your computer files, sometimes deeper than viruses, and it is very hard to remove all norton files from your computer.
josh_42
Posts: 17
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10/16/2008 8:37:11 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
norton also started for some inexplicably reason to conflict with my computer's basic programming. long-story short, after 5 hours, we got a new computer
scissorhands7
Posts: 480
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10/16/2008 9:07:54 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
SomJohn couldn't be more correct JBlake.

1. Norton is such a resource hog that it acts mostly like a virus due to its slowing your system.
2. Norton is $oftware and not Freeware
3. AVG free is definetly still available and is incredibly lightweight.

Top 3 Free Anti-Virus Programs that are free, and lightweight and work.

1. AVG
http://www.download.com...
2. Avira AntiVir Personal
http://www.download.com...
3. Avast
http://www.download.com...

I also recommend downloading
1. AVG Rootkit Free (Shhh!)
http://www.brothersoft.com...

2. Ad-Aware 2008
http://www.download.com...

Both Ad-Aware and AVG Rootkit Free dont have to run on startup and can just be occasionally scanned. I guarantee after using one of the above virus programs your comp will be much faster, safer, and your wallet will be bigger.
I rock peas on my head, but don't call me a peahead, bees on my head but dont call me a beehead, bruce lees on my head but dont call me a lee head...
I hang out with an apple who loves self loathing....
Its my show I'm andy milonakis.
JBlake
Posts: 4,634
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10/17/2008 7:17:19 AM
Posted: 8 years ago
My university offers free Symantec. I have heard bad thing about this one as well, and it is actually the one that I run - before it was Norton. What is the consensus on Symantec?
scissorhands7
Posts: 480
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10/17/2008 8:16:27 AM
Posted: 8 years ago
Symantec = Norton = Bloatware
I rock peas on my head, but don't call me a peahead, bees on my head but dont call me a beehead, bruce lees on my head but dont call me a lee head...
I hang out with an apple who loves self loathing....
Its my show I'm andy milonakis.
brittwaller
Posts: 331
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10/17/2008 7:29:34 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
I had Trend Micro Antivirus and Spy Sweeper. My subscriptions to them (they came with the PC) just ran out. I should simply use the programs noted above by scissors?
Don't I take care of them all?
scissorhands7
Posts: 480
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10/17/2008 7:54:25 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
I definetly would Britt. I use them and I have never had a problem.

I use AVG Free and have that start when windows starts. I have the AVG rootkit scanner and Ad Aware that I run once a month, they are not running in the background. Uninstall your current programs. And Defragment.

You should see a significant speed improvement.

Believe me you are definetly safe with these software.
I rock peas on my head, but don't call me a peahead, bees on my head but dont call me a beehead, bruce lees on my head but dont call me a lee head...
I hang out with an apple who loves self loathing....
Its my show I'm andy milonakis.
brittwaller
Posts: 331
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10/17/2008 11:02:40 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
OK... Maybe this should be in a different thread, but why am I not the actual admin of my admin account? I have run into this problem before... it's quite annoying.
Don't I take care of them all?
scissorhands7
Posts: 480
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10/18/2008 8:14:29 AM
Posted: 8 years ago
are you running vista or xp britt?

If xp just go to start - control panel - user accounts - change type of account - put in you password or whatever - change it to an admin account

If your in vista its a different situation you can still change your account to be an administrator the same way you can in xp however won't be the full admin. If this is your problem then go to search and type in cmd

You should see a command prompt program. Right click it and click run as admin

in the command prompt box type:

Net user administrator /active:yes

Now when you sign in you should see a full administrator account
I rock peas on my head, but don't call me a peahead, bees on my head but dont call me a beehead, bruce lees on my head but dont call me a lee head...
I hang out with an apple who loves self loathing....
Its my show I'm andy milonakis.
brittwaller
Posts: 331
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10/18/2008 10:01:37 AM
Posted: 8 years ago
I have Vista. Have been considering switching to XP, everyone says it is better, faster, etc. Just ran the prompt and now have an admin account. <yay> My only question being, and this is more a question for MS I guess - why the hell wasn't my other admin account an actual admin account?! I am slightly annoyed...

Anyway, thanks!
Don't I take care of them all?
scissorhands7
Posts: 480
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10/18/2008 2:55:53 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
1. Vista does not trust its users to be full administrators.
2. For virus protection so viruses can't delete system files and control another users computer without their knowledge.

However if you have any anti-virus program this is not a problem.
I rock peas on my head, but don't call me a peahead, bees on my head but dont call me a beehead, bruce lees on my head but dont call me a lee head...
I hang out with an apple who loves self loathing....
Its my show I'm andy milonakis.
beem0r
Posts: 1,155
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10/18/2008 3:04:36 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
At 10/18/2008 10:01:37 AM, brittwaller wrote:
I have Vista. Have been considering switching to XP, everyone says it is better, faster, etc. Just ran the prompt and now have an admin account. <yay> My only question being, and this is more a question for MS I guess - why the hell wasn't my other admin account an actual admin account?! I am slightly annoyed...

Anyway, thanks!

Vista doesn't give you admin rights by default because it is a security risk. It is very hard to get dangerous viruses without admin rights. However, for people who aren't incompetent, you can just modify the defaults and use an admin account.

Same reason linux doesn't want you logged in as 'root,' you having access to change system-related files means viruses have this same access.
beem0r
Posts: 1,155
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10/18/2008 3:07:46 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
Also, an on-topic post:

I don't use antivirus programs, because I don't download random stuff from sources I can't trust. If you don't get viruses, you don't need antivirus programs.
scissorhands7
Posts: 480
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10/18/2008 3:17:48 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
Thats not necessarily true beem0r

Many websites you visit have an automatic trojan/virus downloader. Yes even ones you think are clean sites.

Additionally if you get emails its extremely easy to obtain rootkits which can control your machine.

Any time you use programs such as AIM, etc. You can easily get hacked. Also by using any Peer to Peer program its very easy to obtain viruses or trojans.

Theres countless ways that I'm missing as well.
I rock peas on my head, but don't call me a peahead, bees on my head but dont call me a beehead, bruce lees on my head but dont call me a lee head...
I hang out with an apple who loves self loathing....
Its my show I'm andy milonakis.
s0m31john
Posts: 1,879
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10/18/2008 4:26:33 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
That's odd, because I've been an internet power user for years and have never ran anti-virus software full time. It's a waste of memory, AVG is now too since they got rid of their really lightweight client.

Again, PEBKAC, there's no patch for human stupidity, etc.
Ragnar_Rahl
Posts: 19,297
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10/18/2008 5:21:15 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
"
Any time you use programs such as AIM, etc. You can easily get hacked."
Meebo it up.

And although a virus may not be able to automatically download itself (I have no idea), I've seen things that block your browser from doing anything until you click ok (which will download the virus :D).

Fortunately there is always "Close program," but, since the things in question look exactly like they come from Microsoft (they are disguised as antivirus software with the Microsoft logo), I'm sure quite a few people who aren't tech-savvy would be fooled. You don't have to be stupid to fall for it, you just have to not know anything about computers :D.
It came to be at its height. It was commanded to command. It was a capital before its first stone was laid. It was a monument to the spirit of man.
scissorhands7
Posts: 480
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10/18/2008 5:22:20 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
At 10/18/2008 4:26:33 PM, s0m31john wrote:
That's odd, because I've been an internet power user for years and have never ran anti-virus software full time. It's a waste of memory, AVG is now too since they got rid of their really lightweight client.

Again, PEBKAC, there's no patch for human stupidity, etc.

Apparently you don't engage in any peer to peer activity then.
I rock peas on my head, but don't call me a peahead, bees on my head but dont call me a beehead, bruce lees on my head but dont call me a lee head...
I hang out with an apple who loves self loathing....
Its my show I'm andy milonakis.
scissorhands7
Posts: 480
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10/18/2008 5:31:58 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
At 10/18/2008 4:41:24 PM, beem0r wrote:
Unless you have a severe security hole in your browser [internet explorer, maybe?], nothing can 'automatically' download a virus.

Or even... FIREFOX
http://dvlabs.tippingpoint.com...

Every browser is vulnerable to virus activity. If you want to take the risk, fine. However don't recommend that less advanced users go without protection.
I rock peas on my head, but don't call me a peahead, bees on my head but dont call me a beehead, bruce lees on my head but dont call me a lee head...
I hang out with an apple who loves self loathing....
Its my show I'm andy milonakis.
beem0r
Posts: 1,155
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10/18/2008 11:45:52 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
At 10/18/2008 5:31:58 PM, scissorhands7 wrote:
Apparently you don't engage in any peer to peer activity then.
I certainly don't download executables from P2P, and if I'm downloading music I check to make sure it's not some <1mb .wma. I've never checked, but I'd assume that since anything you search will find >9000 of them, theyu're probably viruses of some kind.

Or even... FIREFOX
http://dvlabs.tippingpoint.com...
Every browser is vulnerable to virus activity. If you want to take the risk, fine.
Not from trusted sites. And it's very difficult to get a virus from a bad site if you're using a secure browser.

Also, from your source:
"Not unlike most browser based vulnerabilities that we see these days, user interaction is required such as clicking on a link in email or visiting a malicious web page."
...
"Working with Mozilla on past security issues, we've found them to have a good track record and expect a reasonable turnaround on this issue as well."

Basically, the issue relies on you going to a malicious site, something I think very few of us find ourselves doing these days.
And also, Mozilla quickly fixes its security flaws. This issue was found right after the release of FF 3.0, and was fixed shortly thereafter.

However don't recommend that less advanced users go without protection.
Less advanced users should not be downloading random executables via P2P or going to sites they don't trust. Seriously, on an average day, I don't know anyone who goes to unsafe sites. The only time people might do this is when trying to download some sort of software from a questionable source or clicking links in spam email, and it makes much more sense to simply warn people about doing those things than to tell people to use huge antivirus programs.

And yes, any real-time antivirus program will cause considerable slowdown, since it has to scan a crapload of stuff.

For an average week, how many times does your antivirus software tell you something you have is a virus?
beem0r
Posts: 1,155
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10/18/2008 11:49:21 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
Also, scissors, the fact that you call UAC useless seems to contradict your position here. With UAC, malicious programs can't take control of the system without consent [since not even you can take control of the system without consent]. Therefore, the most malicious of viruses are pretty useless against UAC. And yet you would tell nubs to get rid of their UAC just because it's annoying. You would let them go unshielded.
scissorhands7
Posts: 480
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10/19/2008 2:42:14 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
At 10/18/2008 11:49:21 PM, beem0r wrote:
Also, scissors, the fact that you call UAC useless seems to contradict your position here. With UAC, malicious programs can't take control of the system without consent [since not even you can take control of the system without consent]. Therefore, the most malicious of viruses are pretty useless against UAC. And yet you would tell nubs to get rid of their UAC just because it's annoying. You would let them go unshielded.

Hmm not really.

The UAC does the exact same thing as most antivirus programs, however it can distinguish activities from that of the user and that of the virus. Furthermore it removes the virus/trojan/malicious program wheras the UAC does not. Additionally antivirus programs identify the virus wheras the UAC just notifies you that virus activity is occurring. Furthermore some users might not understand why the UAC is appearing and could mistakenly click yes. Antivirus programs clearly indicate what action is occurring and why.

I recommend turning the UAC off on vista simply because
1. It is useless if you have a functioning antivirus program
2. It is extremely annoying
3. It serves no real function.
I rock peas on my head, but don't call me a peahead, bees on my head but dont call me a beehead, bruce lees on my head but dont call me a lee head...
I hang out with an apple who loves self loathing....
Its my show I'm andy milonakis.
scissorhands7
Posts: 480
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10/19/2008 2:53:17 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
At 10/18/2008 11:45:52 PM, beem0r wrote:
At 10/18/2008 5:31:58 PM, scissorhands7 wrote:
Apparently you don't engage in any peer to peer activity then.
I certainly don't download executables from P2P, and if I'm downloading music I check to make sure it's not some <1mb .wma. I've never checked, but I'd assume that since anything you search will find >9000 of them, theyu're probably viruses of some kind.

Anyone can mistakenly download a torrent or zip file, unzip it only to find it to be a malicious executable. Yes you check to make sure its not phoney, however common users who do not understand file sizes can and are easily fooled into downloading them. So again suggesting that ordinary users do not use antivirus programs is very irresponsible. Yes they aren't a necessity if you are advanced, however even advanced users make simple mistakes. Although reformating a drive is a simple process for the advanced user and could take a couple hours, its a unnecessary pain that I choose to avoid.

Or even... FIREFOX
http://dvlabs.tippingpoint.com...
Every browser is vulnerable to virus activity. If you want to take the risk, fine.
Not from trusted sites. And it's very difficult to get a virus from a bad site if you're using a secure browser.

Also, from your source:
"Not unlike most browser based vulnerabilities that we see these days, user interaction is required such as clicking on a link in email or visiting a malicious web page."

Which is most certainly a common case for users who do not understand fully what they are doing.
...
"Working with Mozilla on past security issues, we've found them to have a good track record and expect a reasonable turnaround on this issue as well."

Basically, the issue relies on you going to a malicious site, something I think very few of us find ourselves doing these days.
And also, Mozilla quickly fixes its security flaws. This issue was found right after the release of FF 3.0, and was fixed shortly thereafter.

However don't recommend that less advanced users go without protection.
Less advanced users should not be downloading random executables via P2P or going to sites they don't trust. Seriously, on an average day, I don't know anyone who goes to unsafe sites. The only time people might do this is when trying to download some sort of software from a questionable source or clicking links in spam email, and it makes much more sense to simply warn people about doing those things than to tell people to use huge antivirus programs.

I'm sure you are quite mistaken. A large deal of unadvanced users use P2P activities, and a large majority of them receive viruses. I work in the IT field and have found this to be the case for a huge majority of college students. Most of them just want their free porn, and are suprised that their computer is spewing with viruses. After I install AVG they can safetly go back to their free porn.


And yes, any real-time antivirus program will cause considerable slowdown, since it has to scan a crapload of stuff.

No, not really. I'm sure that you will find in my post in the Browser War forumn that AVG uses hardly any resources. It runs rather quick scans to find viruses. I completely agree it will cause a huge slowdown if your using something like norton, but AVG and the free lightweight programs you see listed above are very light. I suggest you try one and tell me what you think.

For an average week, how many times does your antivirus software tell you something you have is a virus?

Since I'm advanced its rarely ever happened to me. I do not download P2P files very often, and I don't go on racy websites. I know very well how to avoid viruses.

Although last year I did receive one after downloading a cracked version of a software. It was not and I had a virus.

Immediately AVG found it and deleted it. It saved me hours of reformatting and personallizing my settings again.
I rock peas on my head, but don't call me a peahead, bees on my head but dont call me a beehead, bruce lees on my head but dont call me a lee head...
I hang out with an apple who loves self loathing....
Its my show I'm andy milonakis.
beem0r
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10/19/2008 9:21:00 PM
Posted: 8 years ago
Well then, I suppose we can consider my advice as reinforcing a sort of natural selection. If people are stupid enough to get viruses, they should have to figure out how to deal with their virus when they get it.

And yes, like you said, keygens and cracks are sometimes viruses. However, for people who use their software legally, this is not a problem.