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Best Customizable PC

Reason_Alliance
Posts: 1,283
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7/7/2012 2:50:37 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
I'm totally clueless about Computer Engineering, but I am a Geo-spatial Information Systems technician specifically working with ArcGIS among other programs simultaneously.

I want to build a personal PC that screams!

Can anyone recommend the best possible way to go about engineering a PC over time as I'm able to buy & swap out more parts?

Thanks!
JaxsonRaine
Posts: 3,606
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7/8/2012 3:45:16 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
OOH OOH, I can help!

Tomshardware.com :D

Depending on your budget:

http://www.tomshardware.com...

Or find a pricepoint(usually something like 500/1000/2000) here:

http://www.tomshardware.com...

Shop at newegg. Profit.
twocupcakes: 15 = 13
JaxsonRaine
Posts: 3,606
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7/8/2012 3:46:37 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
Also, if you want to provide any more information, questions, or whatever, I'll try to help. Cheers!

Building your own is def. the way to go. You get better performance and absolutely save money over the long haul.
twocupcakes: 15 = 13
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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7/9/2012 4:28:39 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
There is a good magazine/website called MaximumPC http://www.maximumpc.com... that covers custom building extensively. They test and recommend components and publish what they consider to be the best configuration for various price points.

Building a PC is not very difficult for those with the inclination. I've built several. The biggest pain is usually software issues like getting the drives formatted. My experience is that it isn't cheaper than buying one already constructed, but you get exactly what you want and you learn useful repair skills.
JaxsonRaine
Posts: 3,606
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7/9/2012 5:34:15 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 7/9/2012 4:28:39 PM, RoyLatham wrote:
There is a good magazine/website called MaximumPC http://www.maximumpc.com... that covers custom building extensively. They test and recommend components and publish what they consider to be the best configuration for various price points.

Building a PC is not very difficult for those with the inclination. I've built several. The biggest pain is usually software issues like getting the drives formatted. My experience is that it isn't cheaper than buying one already constructed, but you get exactly what you want and you learn useful repair skills.

I have actually found that it is much cheaper to build your own. First, custom builds generally last much longer, as you can pick affordable, high-quality components. Manufacturers always skimp on boards and power supplies.

Second, you can re-use components. You can use a power supply until it craps out. You can re-use a case. You can re-use RAM effectively for many years. You can re-use hard drives. You can re-use graphics cards.

I can spend $400 every 4th year to upgrade my computer, and it will consistently outperform a $400-$1200 Dell(depending on where I am in my 4-year cycle).
twocupcakes: 15 = 13
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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7/9/2012 9:46:21 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 7/9/2012 5:34:15 PM, JaxsonRaine wrote:
I have actually found that it is much cheaper to build your own. First, custom builds generally last much longer, as you can pick affordable, high-quality components. Manufacturers always skimp on boards and power supplies.

Second, you can re-use components. You can use a power supply until it craps out. You can re-use a case. You can re-use RAM effectively for many years. You can re-use hard drives. You can re-use graphics cards.

I can spend $400 every 4th year to upgrade my computer, and it will consistently outperform a $400-$1200 Dell(depending on where I am in my 4-year cycle).

How do you upgrade the operating system and amount of system memory? Older motherboards won't accept more than 3 GB and XP won't access it. I agree that upgrading is a good way to keep a computer for maybe four to six years, but after that technology has made so many basic upgrades it's not a savings. It does depend on what you are doing. If it's mainly e-mail, web surfing, and OpenOffice -- no problem keeping a computer for a decade. But if it's Photoshop and video editing, the technology gets left behind.

My favorite cheap upgrade is to add a second video card ($40) and a second monitor ($150). Those can be moved to a new computer.
JaxsonRaine
Posts: 3,606
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7/9/2012 10:41:18 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 7/9/2012 9:46:21 PM, RoyLatham wrote:
At 7/9/2012 5:34:15 PM, JaxsonRaine wrote:
I have actually found that it is much cheaper to build your own. First, custom builds generally last much longer, as you can pick affordable, high-quality components. Manufacturers always skimp on boards and power supplies.

Second, you can re-use components. You can use a power supply until it craps out. You can re-use a case. You can re-use RAM effectively for many years. You can re-use hard drives. You can re-use graphics cards.

I can spend $400 every 4th year to upgrade my computer, and it will consistently outperform a $400-$1200 Dell(depending on where I am in my 4-year cycle).

How do you upgrade the operating system and amount of system memory? Older motherboards won't accept more than 3 GB and XP won't access it. I agree that upgrading is a good way to keep a computer for maybe four to six years, but after that technology has made so many basic upgrades it's not a savings. It does depend on what you are doing. If it's mainly e-mail, web surfing, and OpenOffice -- no problem keeping a computer for a decade. But if it's Photoshop and video editing, the technology gets left behind.

My favorite cheap upgrade is to add a second video card ($40) and a second monitor ($150). Those can be moved to a new computer.

There are plenty of components that don't need to be upgraded very often, but we waste money on those when we buy an entire new computer. Cases, power supplies, wireless adapters, HDD, DVD RW, heatsinks, fans...

Depending on your setup, you can reuse a processor when you upgrade mobo, reuse RAM when you upgrade processor/mobo.

If you buy an entire new computer though, you are spending money on every part whether you need it or not.

And if you shop bundles at Newegg or TigerDirect, you can save $50-$100 on a $400 build, and get a better computer for the same price as a Dell.
twocupcakes: 15 = 13
xxdarkxx
Posts: 3,090
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7/15/2012 7:32:29 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 7/9/2012 9:46:21 PM, RoyLatham wrote:
At 7/9/2012 5:34:15 PM, JaxsonRaine wrote:
I have actually found that it is much cheaper to build your own. First, custom builds generally last much longer, as you can pick affordable, high-quality components. Manufacturers always skimp on boards and power supplies.

Second, you can re-use components. You can use a power supply until it craps out. You can re-use a case. You can re-use RAM effectively for many years. You can re-use hard drives. You can re-use graphics cards.

I can spend $400 every 4th year to upgrade my computer, and it will consistently outperform a $400-$1200 Dell(depending on where I am in my 4-year cycle).

How do you upgrade the operating system and amount of system memory? Older motherboards won't accept more than 3 GB and XP won't access it. I agree that upgrading is a good way to keep a computer for maybe four to six years, but after that technology has made so many basic upgrades it's not a savings. It does depend on what you are doing. If it's mainly e-mail, web surfing, and OpenOffice -- no problem keeping a computer for a decade. But if it's Photoshop and video editing, the technology gets left behind.

My favorite cheap upgrade is to add a second video card ($40) and a second monitor ($150). Those can be moved to a new computer.

What kind of video card are you buying for $40...?
xxdarkxx
Posts: 3,090
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7/16/2012 5:58:39 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 7/16/2012 2:28:16 AM, JaxsonRaine wrote:
At 7/15/2012 7:32:29 PM, xxdarkxx wrote:
What kind of video card are you buying for $40...?

My guess would be

http://www.newegg.com...

but.. but... thats sh!t...
DirkBergurk
Posts: 32
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7/17/2012 12:29:40 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 7/16/2012 5:58:39 PM, xxdarkxx wrote:
At 7/16/2012 2:28:16 AM, JaxsonRaine wrote:
At 7/15/2012 7:32:29 PM, xxdarkxx wrote:
What kind of video card are you buying for $40...?

My guess would be

http://www.newegg.com...

but.. but... thats sh!t...

Agreed. That card is terrible. However, I bought a 6670 for only $40 about a month ago after rebate. You just have to watch the right deal sites. Building a computer is ALWAYS cheaper than buying a prebuilt one if you know what you are doing.