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Hydrogen as renewable energy

mpu
Posts: 3
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10/10/2016 8:48:59 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
Renewable energy has come a long way in the last decade, but efficiency, costs and emissions are still a serious issue. Hydrogen is underated, but unfortunately extraction processes particularly using fossil fuels is no less green that burning diesel in gensets to produce energy. Yes, there are carbon emission collectors, but again these are expensive and not commonly used around the globe. Already the cost of fossil fuels is the basis of H2 extraction costs. H2 is hugely abundant in seawater, and some companies are extracting using catalysts, but again not so green. Emissions are generally carbon monoxides and dioxides, nitrous oxides. Whereas, burning H2 emits only vapor.
Marine Power Utilities (MPU) has designed and built an H2 extraction manifold powered by a 12v battery used for on-demand directly into an H2ICE with alternator, capable of producing up to 60 m/W/day with a single unit. They can provide a floating platform housing their manifold and genset to generate energy at a low cost, low carbon footprint for almost any application. Using multiple engines on a large rig like platform, can produce energy in the hundreds of mega watts/day. This technology is more than disruptive and will certainly turn the energy sector on it's ear. They are currently looking for investors. It will be a shame if the IP was purchased and shelved, as it has massive potential to help lower worldwide carbon emissions as the demand for energy increases.
Quadrunner
Posts: 1,070
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10/10/2016 11:35:55 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/10/2016 8:48:59 AM, mpu wrote:
Renewable energy has come a long way in the last decade, but efficiency, costs and emissions are still a serious issue. Hydrogen is underated, but unfortunately extraction processes particularly using fossil fuels is no less green that burning diesel in gensets to produce energy. Yes, there are carbon emission collectors, but again these are expensive and not commonly used around the globe. Already the cost of fossil fuels is the basis of H2 extraction costs. H2 is hugely abundant in seawater, and some companies are extracting using catalysts, but again not so green. Emissions are generally carbon monoxides and dioxides, nitrous oxides. Whereas, burning H2 emits only vapor.
Marine Power Utilities (MPU) has designed and built an H2 extraction manifold powered by a 12v battery used for on-demand directly into an H2ICE with alternator, capable of producing up to 60 m/W/day with a single unit. They can provide a floating platform housing their manifold and genset to generate energy at a low cost, low carbon footprint for almost any application. Using multiple engines on a large rig like platform, can produce energy in the hundreds of mega watts/day. This technology is more than disruptive and will certainly turn the energy sector on it's ear. They are currently looking for investors. It will be a shame if the IP was purchased and shelved, as it has massive potential to help lower worldwide carbon emissions as the demand for energy increases.

Could you provide a link please? What is 60 m/W/day
Wisdom is found where the wise seek it.
mpu
Posts: 3
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10/10/2016 6:59:41 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/10/2016 11:35:55 AM, Quadrunner wrote:
for energy increases.

Could you provide a link please? What is 60 m/W/day

Sorry, was a typo, should be 60 mW/day. Company website is www.marinepowerutilities.com The company has built 2 working prototypes which exceeded expectations and now looking for investors.
R0b1Billion
Posts: 3,726
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10/24/2016 12:34:29 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
Hydrogen, as is every renewable energy source, is limited. There is no magic bullet, no technology that will step in and solve all our problems. Hydrogen is hard to store, for one thing, because it is so small that it penetrates and escapes just about anything you put it in. And the fact that it is highly-explosive doesn't help either, it is WAY more dangerous to handle than gasoline.

With that said, hydrogen has its place in a well-rounded renewable-energy portfolio. The key to success with renewable energy is:

1) Reduce consumption.
2) REDUCE CONSUMPTION
3) Take advantage of every sort of renewable energy. A little geo here, a little solar there, wind, hydrogen, etc. All of these have limits, but put together, along with reducing consumption (if I haven't mentioned that already), we can power our economy sustainably.
4) Use non-renewable sources (i.e., fossil fuels) sparingly. Emergency situations, for example. We should not be using them regularly.
5) Nuclear energy should be reserved for areas that have trouble implementing renewable energy sources.
Beliefs in a nutshell:
- The Ends never justify the Means.
- Objectivity is secondary to subjectivity.
- The War on Drugs is the worst policy in the U.S.
- Most people worship technology as a religion.
- Computers will never become sentient.
Quadrunner
Posts: 1,070
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10/24/2016 5:14:27 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/24/2016 12:34:29 AM, R0b1Billion wrote:
Hydrogen, as is every renewable energy source, is limited. There is no magic bullet, no technology that will step in and solve all our problems. Hydrogen is hard to store, for one thing, because it is so small that it penetrates and escapes just about anything you put it in. And the fact that it is highly-explosive doesn't help either, it is WAY more dangerous to handle than gasoline.

With that said, hydrogen has its place in a well-rounded renewable-energy portfolio. The key to success with renewable energy is:

1) Reduce consumption.
2) REDUCE CONSUMPTION
3) Take advantage of every sort of renewable energy. A little geo here, a little solar there, wind, hydrogen, etc. All of these have limits, but put together, along with reducing consumption (if I haven't mentioned that already), we can power our economy sustainably.
4) Use non-renewable sources (i.e., fossil fuels) sparingly. Emergency situations, for example. We should not be using them regularly.
5) Nuclear energy should be reserved for areas that have trouble implementing renewable energy sources.

6) Don't forget ethanol, and biodiesel, the here and now, immediate solutions.
Wisdom is found where the wise seek it.