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Optimal Tax Revenue

brant.merrell
Posts: 27
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11/9/2017 2:59:56 PM
Posted: 1 week ago
I notice that most discussions about taxes center around who ought to be paying more or less. I'd like to zoom out and discuss what the collective body of taxpayers ought to be paying in relation to the GDP, the national debt, the value of government services, and whatever else presents itself as relevant.

Obviously the details for raising revenue involve debates about income tax, property tax, subsidies, loopholes, sales tax, corporate tax, etc... But there ought to be at least one topic devoted to as a whole, should taxation be higher or lower?

The World Bank estimates that the United States has a revenue-to-GDP ratio of 11.3% [1], and a debt-to-GDP ratio of 99.8% [2]. The 2016 Federal Budget [3] allocated $71B for education, $26B for energy, $7B for environmental protection, and suffered a deficit of $552B. Energy + Education + Environmental Protection totaled ($104B / $16.5T = ) 0.6% of GDP.

I am of the opinion that funding the arts and sciences, limiting national debt, providing stimulus packages and training programs for the workforce, managing a transition towards alternative energy, and maintaining / rebuilding the planetary ecosystem are collectively worth a revenue-to-GDP ratio of up to 25%.

This is not to say I believe fulfilling such priorities requires that GDP/revenue = 25%; I expect these expenses could be covered with a ratio of 15%. But I hold that we ought to be able to fund these priorities, and avoid bogging ourselves down with anxieties about socialism until the ratio reaches 25%.

Given that I think tax revenue and spending ought to have been higher during the last year of the Obama administration, it goes without saying that I expect the Trump administration to woefully underspend.

But that's just me; I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

1. https://data.worldbank.org...
2. https://data.worldbank.org...
3. http://federal-budget.insidegov.com...
ViceRegent
Posts: 836
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11/10/2017 3:41:02 PM
Posted: 1 week ago
At 11/9/2017 2:59:56 PM, brant.merrell wrote:
I notice that most discussions about taxes center around who ought to be paying more or less. I'd like to zoom out and discuss what the collective body of taxpayers ought to be paying in relation to the GDP, the national debt, the value of government services, and whatever else presents itself as relevant.

Obviously the details for raising revenue involve debates about income tax, property tax, subsidies, loopholes, sales tax, corporate tax, etc... But there ought to be at least one topic devoted to as a whole, should taxation be higher or lower?

The World Bank estimates that the United States has a revenue-to-GDP ratio of 11.3% [1], and a debt-to-GDP ratio of 99.8% [2]. The 2016 Federal Budget [3] allocated $71B for education, $26B for energy, $7B for environmental protection, and suffered a deficit of $552B. Energy + Education + Environmental Protection totaled ($104B / $16.5T = ) 0.6% of GDP.

I am of the opinion that funding the arts and sciences, limiting national debt, providing stimulus packages and training programs for the workforce, managing a transition towards alternative energy, and maintaining / rebuilding the planetary ecosystem are collectively worth a revenue-to-GDP ratio of up to 25%.

This is not to say I believe fulfilling such priorities requires that GDP/revenue = 25%; I expect these expenses could be covered with a ratio of 15%. But I hold that we ought to be able to fund these priorities, and avoid bogging ourselves down with anxieties about socialism until the ratio reaches 25%.

Given that I think tax revenue and spending ought to have been higher during the last year of the Obama administration, it goes without saying that I expect the Trump administration to woefully underspend.

But that's just me; I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

1. https://data.worldbank.org...
2. https://data.worldbank.org...
3. http://federal-budget.insidegov.com...

Funny, none of those things is Constitutional. Why not start a private charity to fund these activities instead of advocating the stealing the wealth of your fellow citizens.
brant.merrell
Posts: 27
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11/16/2017 10:03:26 PM
Posted: 19 hours ago
At 11/10/2017 3:41:02 PM, ViceRegent wrote:
At 11/9/2017 2:59:56 PM, brant.merrell wrote:
I notice that most discussions about taxes center around who ought to be paying more or less. I'd like to zoom out and discuss what the collective body of taxpayers ought to be paying in relation to the GDP, the national debt, the value of government services, and whatever else presents itself as relevant.

Obviously the details for raising revenue involve debates about income tax, property tax, subsidies, loopholes, sales tax, corporate tax, etc... But there ought to be at least one topic devoted to as a whole, should taxation be higher or lower?

The World Bank estimates that the United States has a revenue-to-GDP ratio of 11.3% [1], and a debt-to-GDP ratio of 99.8% [2]. The 2016 Federal Budget [3] allocated $71B for education, $26B for energy, $7B for environmental protection, and suffered a deficit of $552B. Energy + Education + Environmental Protection totaled ($104B / $16.5T = ) 0.6% of GDP.

I am of the opinion that funding the arts and sciences, limiting national debt, providing stimulus packages and training programs for the workforce, managing a transition towards alternative energy, and maintaining / rebuilding the planetary ecosystem are collectively worth a revenue-to-GDP ratio of up to 25%.

This is not to say I believe fulfilling such priorities requires that GDP/revenue = 25%; I expect these expenses could be covered with a ratio of 15%. But I hold that we ought to be able to fund these priorities, and avoid bogging ourselves down with anxieties about socialism until the ratio reaches 25%.

Given that I think tax revenue and spending ought to have been higher during the last year of the Obama administration, it goes without saying that I expect the Trump administration to woefully underspend.

But that's just me; I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

1. https://data.worldbank.org...
2. https://data.worldbank.org...
3. http://federal-budget.insidegov.com...

Funny, none of those things is Constitutional. Why not start a private charity to fund these activities instead of advocating the stealing the wealth of your fellow citizens.

When *I* believed everything was unconstitutional, it was because I belonged to a homeschool group in which a few radicals relentlessly sowed this belief among children, but the people who actually asked questions about how to apply an interpretive method to the Constitution eventually quit believing the entire government was unconstitutional.

Maybe you can help me see the logic they never managed to express, but you'll have to make a debate challenge out of it. In creating this topic, I took for granted that we live in reality and we have a tax system (legal or not), so I'm asking how to *optimize* it. You can call the puzzle illegal, but that doesn't solve the puzzle.
TheMarketLibertarian
Posts: 366
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11/17/2017 9:00:29 AM
Posted: 8 hours ago
At 11/9/2017 2:59:56 PM, brant.merrell wrote:
I notice that most discussions about taxes center around who ought to be paying more or less. I'd like to zoom out and discuss what the collective body of taxpayers ought to be paying in relation to the GDP, the national debt, the value of government services, and whatever else presents itself as relevant.

Obviously the details for raising revenue involve debates about income tax, property tax, subsidies, loopholes, sales tax, corporate tax, etc... But there ought to be at least one topic devoted to as a whole, should taxation be higher or lower?

The World Bank estimates that the United States has a revenue-to-GDP ratio of 11.3% [1], and a debt-to-GDP ratio of 99.8% [2]. The 2016 Federal Budget [3] allocated $71B for education, $26B for energy, $7B for environmental protection, and suffered a deficit of $552B. Energy + Education + Environmental Protection totaled ($104B / $16.5T = ) 0.6% of GDP.

I am of the opinion that funding the arts and sciences, limiting national debt, providing stimulus packages and training programs for the workforce, managing a transition towards alternative energy, and maintaining / rebuilding the planetary ecosystem are collectively worth a revenue-to-GDP ratio of up to 25%.

This is not to say I believe fulfilling such priorities requires that GDP/revenue = 25%; I expect these expenses could be covered with a ratio of 15%. But I hold that we ought to be able to fund these priorities, and avoid bogging ourselves down with anxieties about socialism until the ratio reaches 25%.

Given that I think tax revenue and spending ought to have been higher during the last year of the Obama administration, it goes without saying that I expect the Trump administration to woefully underspend.

But that's just me; I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

1. https://data.worldbank.org...
2. https://data.worldbank.org...
3. http://federal-budget.insidegov.com...

All of those things are utterly useless wastes of money. The public indoctrination system doesn't teach kids anything, and so called alternative energies are inefficient and unable yo function without subsidies. One coal mine produces more energy than all the windmills in America.
The proper portion between government spending and the GDP should be that authorized under the constitution, anything further should go out the window.
ViceRegent
Posts: 836
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11/17/2017 4:47:26 PM
Posted: 53 minutes ago
At 11/16/2017 10:03:26 PM, brant.merrell wrote:
At 11/10/2017 3:41:02 PM, ViceRegent wrote:
At 11/9/2017 2:59:56 PM, brant.merrell wrote:
I notice that most discussions about taxes center around who ought to be paying more or less. I'd like to zoom out and discuss what the collective body of taxpayers ought to be paying in relation to the GDP, the national debt, the value of government services, and whatever else presents itself as relevant.

Obviously the details for raising revenue involve debates about income tax, property tax, subsidies, loopholes, sales tax, corporate tax, etc... But there ought to be at least one topic devoted to as a whole, should taxation be higher or lower?

The World Bank estimates that the United States has a revenue-to-GDP ratio of 11.3% [1], and a debt-to-GDP ratio of 99.8% [2]. The 2016 Federal Budget [3] allocated $71B for education, $26B for energy, $7B for environmental protection, and suffered a deficit of $552B. Energy + Education + Environmental Protection totaled ($104B / $16.5T = ) 0.6% of GDP.

I am of the opinion that funding the arts and sciences, limiting national debt, providing stimulus packages and training programs for the workforce, managing a transition towards alternative energy, and maintaining / rebuilding the planetary ecosystem are collectively worth a revenue-to-GDP ratio of up to 25%.

This is not to say I believe fulfilling such priorities requires that GDP/revenue = 25%; I expect these expenses could be covered with a ratio of 15%. But I hold that we ought to be able to fund these priorities, and avoid bogging ourselves down with anxieties about socialism until the ratio reaches 25%.

Given that I think tax revenue and spending ought to have been higher during the last year of the Obama administration, it goes without saying that I expect the Trump administration to woefully underspend.

But that's just me; I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

1. https://data.worldbank.org...
2. https://data.worldbank.org...
3. http://federal-budget.insidegov.com...

Funny, none of those things is Constitutional. Why not start a private charity to fund these activities instead of advocating the stealing the wealth of your fellow citizens.

When *I* believed everything was unconstitutional, it was because I belonged to a homeschool group in which a few radicals relentlessly sowed this belief among children, but the people who actually asked questions about how to apply an interpretive method to the Constitution eventually quit believing the entire government was unconstitutional.

Maybe you can help me see the logic they never managed to express, but you'll have to make a debate challenge out of it. In creating this topic, I took for granted that we live in reality and we have a tax system (legal or not), so I'm asking how to *optimize* it. You can call the puzzle illegal, but that doesn't solve the puzzle.

Ignorant moron, to deny this or that is constitution is not to argue that everything in unconstitutional. No straw man arguments, for they only make you look irrational. And yes, starting and ending with the Constitution forms the only basis for the tax discussion.