Total Posts:5|Showing Posts:1-5
Jump to topic:

Student loans - yes or no?

Falkman
Posts: 48
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
12/22/2017 2:40:52 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
When a student graduates from high school and is considering college and a career, the main issue is how to pay for it.

Because of the debt load they are looking at, no student should even consider student loans unless their chosen career path will net them enough future income to warrant the expense.

If your degree will be in education, social work, arts & humanities or some esoteric specialty like women's studies, don't borrow the money for college. Especially in education (where experienced teachers don't make a whole lot more than new ones) the future economic payoff isn't worth the cost of crushing student loan debt.

However, if you are going into medicine, law, nursing, computer science, accounting, marketing, etc. your future earnings make loans worthwhile.

Not everyone is cut out for college. For example, a high school graduate in Austin with good grades but no college plans could either go to a community college or enter training programs offered by Samsung or Toyota for future jobs at their plants in Austin or San Antonio. In many cases, they will be making more money in a few years than a lot of college graduates.
Waterborne
Posts: 63
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
12/22/2017 5:46:14 PM
Posted: 6 months ago
As most students do not supplement their education with study of life skills as well, figuring out how to pay for student loans is an issue. However, if the student does take the initiative to figure it out, it may very well not be. There is so much misleading information. Taking the right electives (i.e. business and leadership skills classes) help as well. It all boils down to the student.

Education and women's studies are work of passion and not practicality; if someone wants to major in women's studies or education, they likely have an intrinsic motivation for it. Social work, the arts, and the humanities can actually rival computer science if done skillfully. Marketing is likely useless because someone with a humanities degree could do the exact same job. Medicine, law, computer science, and accounting are all going to be harder to find jobs in due to artificial intelligence in a couple decades., while liberal arts and humanities degrees will likely rise in demand.

The last part about not everyone being cut out for college is psychologically irrefutable.
johnhozy
Posts: 2
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
12/27/2017 6:53:05 AM
Posted: 6 months ago
Education loans for students provide a greater flexibility as well more manageable conditions and terms than standard non-education loans. According to https://australianreviewer.com... both Federal as well private lenders know the requirements of a college career, and strive for making education loans easier to manage for the students.
maheereddy
Posts: 1
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
3/15/2018 3:23:55 PM
Posted: 4 months ago
The launch of New Web-Based Portal Vidhya Lakshmi by Government of India: The Ministry of Finance under the Government of India has recently launched a Web-Based Portal called Vidhya Lakshmi for the students seeking the Educational Loans https://www.govtjobsclub.in...
MichaelW
Posts: 6
Add as Friend
Challenge to a Debate
Send a Message
5/14/2018 9:01:11 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 12/22/2017 2:40:52 PM, Falkman wrote:
When a student graduates from high school and is considering college and a career, the main issue is how to pay for it.

Because of the debt load they are looking at, no student should even consider student loans unless their chosen career path will net them enough future income to warrant the expense.

If your degree will be in education, social work, arts & humanities or some esoteric specialty like women's studies, don't borrow the money for college. Especially in education (where experienced teachers don't make a whole lot more than new ones) the future economic payoff isn't worth the cost of crushing student loan debt.

However, if you are going into medicine, law, nursing, computer science, accounting, marketing, etc. your future earnings make loans worthwhile.

Not everyone is cut out for college. For example, a high school graduate in Austin with good grades but no college plans could either go to a community college or enter training programs offered by Samsung or Toyota for future jobs at their plants in Austin or San Antonio. In many cases, they will be making more money in a few years than a lot of college graduates.

Student loans can be a touchy subject. No one wants to accrue debt in his or her name, but sometimes borrowing money may be necessary. For me, loans aren"t necessary, but allow me to not have to work while in school, which means I can prioritize academics and also pursue extracurricular activities. Other students, however, need the federal aid in order to attend college. Unfortunately, dealing with loans can be very stressful and complicated.

Other loans, as long as borrowed responsibly, should work similarly. If you borrow the money to have fun at the bars on the weekends or just to goof around with, then yes, that growing debt will prove to be a pain to repay. If you borrow the money to help work your way through college by using it for gas, rent, groceries, and other costs of living, the money is probably going to be worth it in the end and you will be thankful for having the help.

It is important to remember the simple fact that you DO have to pay the money back, and with interest. Weigh the pros and cons to determine whether or not you should borrow the money, and make sure you plan where those funds will be allocated. Make a budget if you need to. If you are responsible with your funds, taking advantage of loans won"t be a terrible thing to do.

https://bestwritinghelp.org...