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About Easter.....

BlackMatters
Posts: 7
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12/26/2017 6:49:41 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
Is Easter a pagan fertility or a passover?

Alot of people say, Easter has to do with the Jewish passover, not the pagan fertility celebration. How true is that?
Inconvenient_Truth
Posts: 101
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12/26/2017 7:39:28 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 12/26/2017 6:49:41 PM, BlackMatters wrote:
Is Easter a pagan fertility or a passover?

Alot of people say, Easter has to do with the Jewish passover, not the pagan fertility celebration. How true is that?

From the research I've done in the past, Easter is mainly a Christian celebration though having roots in the Jewish Passover. There are some superficial symbols that have spilled over from pagan belief systems into the celebration of Easter, some with purpose some incidentally.
BlackMatters
Posts: 7
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12/26/2017 8:02:54 PM
Posted: 3 months ago
At 12/26/2017 7:39:28 PM, Inconvenient_Truth wrote:
At 12/26/2017 6:49:41 PM, BlackMatters wrote:
Is Easter a pagan fertility or a passover?

Alot of people say, Easter has to do with the Jewish passover, not the pagan fertility celebration. How true is that?

From the research I've done in the past, Easter is mainly a Christian celebration though having roots in the Jewish Passover. There are some superficial symbols that have spilled over from pagan belief systems into the celebration of Easter, some with purpose some incidentally.

But peple say Eostre was a German goddess. Even the date of Easter, the first Sunday after the first full moon after March 25, is a pagan observation.
Inconvenient_Truth
Posts: 101
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12/27/2017 4:52:46 AM
Posted: 3 months ago
But peple say Eostre was a German goddess. Even the date of Easter, the first Sunday after the first full moon after March 25, is a pagan observation.

The origin of the name is a contentious, actually. Some believe the origin is related to the pagan fertility goddess Eostre. However, Pascha is the Greek and Latin word for Easter which translates to the Hebrew word Passover. Easter has it's roots in the Jewish Passover, for which date is determined by the lunar calendar. While there is an Eostre, there's not a celebration of that goddess specifically. The closest pagan celebration is Ostara, which occurs at the spring equinox. This is, of course, not tied to the lunar calendar like the celebration of Easter. I don't believe there's any pagan observation on the first Sunday after March 25th. I'm not sure pagans cared about Sundays or March 25th.