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“It is easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them” (Alfred Adler). Do you agree?

Asked by: Sara1993
  • Undoubtedly It Is

    Defending a principle or ideal is almost inevitably easier than living up to one. When someone attacks an ideal you possess, or that ideal is questioned, a natural human response is to fight to protect it. You have, in that type of situation, something to fight for that you truly believe in, even if it costs you your life; something "courageous". However, attempting to hold on and live up to that principle, day after day, requires much more effort than simply defending it. We are usually not required to actively fight for our principles every moment of our lives. Such occasions are generally few and far between, so we anxiously wait for them to come along so we can "prove" our convictions. However, each and every day, we do have the opportunity to put forth all of our being in a striving to uphold the very principals we believe in. But herein lies the difficulty in that: in our everyday lives, when we are behind closed doors, and our ideals are not publicly put to the test - when no one else can see us - we are forced to realize it takes more than courage to uphold our beliefs; it takes a consistent character.

  • Undoubtedly It Is

    Defending a principle or ideal is almost inevitably easier than living up to one. When someone attacks an ideal you possess, or that ideal is questioned, a natural human response is to fight to protect it. You have, in that type of situation, something to fight for that you truly believe in, even if it costs you your life; something "courageous". However, attempting to hold on and live up to that principle, day after day, requires much more effort than simply defending it. We are usually not required to actively fight for our principles every moment of our lives. Such occasions are generally few and far between, making them easier than a constant dedication to a certain lifestyle. What we so often do have the opportunity to do is to put forth all of our being in a striving to uphold the very principals we believe in. But herein lies the difficulty of that: in our everyday lives, when we are behind closed doors, and our ideals are not publicly put to the test - when no one else can see us - we are forced to realize it takes more than courage to uphold our beliefs; it takes a consistent character.

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