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A new North Carolina law, which goes into effect Oct. 1st, seeks to block the public from seeing dashboard and body camera videos recorded by police. Will this worsen race relations in the state?

A new North Carolina law, which goes into effect Oct. 1st, seeks to block the public from seeing dashboard and body camera videos recorded by police. Will this worsen race relations in the state?
  • Yes, blocking police videos will worsen race relations.

    The public has a right to know what the police do. Dashboard and body camera videos are important, so that we can see what the police do right and wrong. Even when the police are clearly seen murdering unarmed black people on video, there is rarely anything done about it. Blocking these videos will make the situation even worse. Just stop shooting people.

  • Yes, I think so.

    Body cameras should be a tool to make law enforcement more transparent and accountable to the communities they serve, but this shameful law will make it nearly impossible to achieve those goals. It's hard enough to get people to cooperate with the police when there is some form of privacy involved.

  • New North Carolina law will worsen race relations

    A new law in North Carolina will worsen race relations. It will block the public from seeing dashboard and body camera videos recorded by the police. This comes at a time when minorities do not trust the police, and comes on the heels of an incident in which the police and community have a different version of events. This will only increase the mistrust.

  • Yes, to solve police brutality we must have video evidence.

    Race relations are a hot topic in this country, especially regarding the treatment minorities receive at the hands of some law enforcement officers. Dashboard and body camera videos should be available to the public upon request. This way officers can be held accountable for their actions and the nation can have more informed discussions about the steps needed to end systemic racism and police brutality against minorities. Relations will only worsen if videos are withheld. The police should be transparent about their interactions with the public because that will only help them improve their relationship with the people they swore to protect and help decrease the tension.

  • The distrust between the public and the police will grow

    There is already vast amounts of distrust between the general public and the police, and when this law goes into effect, then whenever someone is shot and killed by the police, whether it was justified or not, the public will assume the police are in the wrong without the definitive evidence. Without the video evidence the general public will be left with only the words of people they already believe are corrupt.

  • The Gun Does All The Talking

    Blacks have been so marginalized and disenfranchised that they are becoming all to aware that words and political action are simply useless to them in too many situations. When the billionaire mayor of NYC arrested 26 reporters in one day and only received a slap on the wrist even the mass media refused to make a stink simply because there was no money to made.

    Why? You might ask, because over half the population insists that the government and mass media they call evil lie to them for their own protection. Our constitutional rights have been suspended indefinitely and congress has already given the military the legal authority to round up citizens like so many diseased cattle if necessary. In a country of the deaf who see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil shooting cops or random strangers and rioting are rapidly becoming the only way left to protest anything.

  • Just media propaganda.

    Karen Anderson, executive director of the ACLU's North Carolina chapter said in the article the law was "disgraceful" and that "video footage of police shootings can provide crucial evidence of what took place -- especially when there are conflicting accounts from police and community members." This is true but the place for such evidence is in a court of law and not a trial by media.

  • The Gun Does All The Talking

    Blacks have been so marginalized and disenfranchised that they are becoming all to aware that words and political action are simply useless to them in too many situations. When the billionaire mayor of NYC arrested 26 reporters in one day and only received a slap on the wrist even the mass media refused to make a stink simply because there was no money to made.

    Why? You might ask, because over half the population insists that the government and mass media they call evil lie to them for their own protection. Our constitutional rights have been suspended indefinitely and congress has already given the military the legal authority to round up citizens like so many diseased cattle if necessary. In a country of the deaf who see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil shooting cops or random strangers and rioting are rapidly becoming the only way left to protest anything.

  • For a short time yes, but it needs to happen.

    Okay, I said yes in my opening statement, but I believe in the longer term it will be good for a surprisingly violent state to be blocked from access to these videos. People, in mass, are jumping to conclusions before the case are even brought to trial and responding dangerously. Although initially this will likely add to the distrust the people have, it is my experience that most people have relatively short memories and its only a matter of time before the benefits are realized. People apparently, cannot handle these videos in a fair, just, and well thought out manner and are resorting to "solving" violence with violence. The cycle needs to be broken by someone, and our justice system is a great place to start.


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