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An unauthorized Harry Potter book was published in China: Should more be done to protect copyrights in foreign countries?

  • China doesn't value human life

    By degrading private works, China shows that it doesn't value human life. There is no incentive for a person to create good work that we all enjoy if the person knows that someone else will just steal it and take all of their profit from it. It benefits all of society to allow people to protect what they earn from something they created.

  • Yes, intellectual property is important.

    Yes, more should be done to protect copyrights in foreign countries. Even for a wealthy, well-known author like J.K. Rowling, unauthorized copies of her work strike a financial and a creative blow. A book or other work of art may be a creative work rather than a tangible product, but the author has the same right to it as an inventor does to patent an invention. Authors deserve to be paid fairly for their work even when that means enforcing copyright in foreign countries, because ideas transcend borders.

  • Yes, more should be done to protect copyrights in foreign countries.

    Yes, I think the unauthorized Harry Potter book that was published in China is a great example as to why more should be done to protect copyrights in foreign countries. Creators of original thoughts (artists, writers, musicians, designers, etc.) should be celebrated for their efforts and contributions to culture through copyright protections that would enable the creators to be adequately compensated and acknowledged.

  • Yes, more should be done to protect copyrights in foreign countries.

    Yes, more action should be taken to protect copyrights in foreign countries because copyright infringement causes authors to lose ownership and pay of their hard work. Copyrights exist to protect the originators from scams and unlawful reproduction. When copyright is violated, people lose money and credit, which is not a very strong incentive to continue producing original works.

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