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Are Adults Hurting Young Children by Pushing Them to Achieve?

  • Yes they are

    Paragraphs that may be good evidence
    “The best you can say is that they’re useless,” said Alison Gopnik, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, who compared the escalation of supplemental education with Irish elk competing to see which had the biggest antlers. “The result is that they go around tottering, unable to walk, under the enormous weight of these antlers they’ve developed,” she said. “I think it’s true of American parents from high school all the way down to preschool.”
    “Age 3 is the sweet spot,” said Joseph Nativo, chief financial officer for Kumon North America. “But if they’re out of a diaper and can sit still with a Kumon instructor for 15 minutes, we will take them.”
    PARENTS pay $200 to $300 a month for their 2-, 3-, 4- or 5-year-old to spend up to an hour twice weekly being tutored at a Junior Kumon center — 20 to 30 minutes each on reading and math. Children are then expected to do 20 minutes of homework on each subject every day, with their parents guiding and grading them. Recommended reading lists start in preschool with “Goodnight Moon” and “Each Peach Pear Plum.”
    “It used to seem like a horrible thing to do to your kid — why would you force this?”
    “Part of them are saying, ‘This isn’t right, 3-year-olds should be playing in the sandbox and putting together mixing bowls,’
    “When you’re putting blocks together, you’re learning how to be a physicist,” agreed Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, a psychologist at Temple University and an author of “Einstein Never Used Flash Cards.” “When you’re learning how to balance things and calculate how tall you can make your building, you’re learning how to be a physicist. Having your kid drill and kill and fill in worksheets at 2 and 3 and 4 to the best of our knowledge so far does not give your child a leg up on anything.”
    “Yes, your child might know more of his letters than the child who spent Saturday in the sandbox,” she said. “But the people who are team players, who are creative innovators, they are the ones who are going to invent the next iPad. The kids who are just memorizing are going to be outsourced to the kids in India who have memorized the same stuff.”

  • Yes they are

    Paragraphs that may be good evidence
    “The best you can say is that they’re useless,” said Alison Gopnik, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, who compared the escalation of supplemental education with Irish elk competing to see which had the biggest antlers. “The result is that they go around tottering, unable to walk, under the enormous weight of these antlers they’ve developed,” she said. “I think it’s true of American parents from high school all the way down to preschool.”
    “Age 3 is the sweet spot,” said Joseph Nativo, chief financial officer for Kumon North America. “But if they’re out of a diaper and can sit still with a Kumon instructor for 15 minutes, we will take them.”
    PARENTS pay $200 to $300 a month for their 2-, 3-, 4- or 5-year-old to spend up to an hour twice weekly being tutored at a Junior Kumon center — 20 to 30 minutes each on reading and math. Children are then expected to do 20 minutes of homework on each subject every day, with their parents guiding and grading them. Recommended reading lists start in preschool with “Goodnight Moon” and “Each Peach Pear Plum.”
    “It used to seem like a horrible thing to do to your kid — why would you force this?”
    “Part of them are saying, ‘This isn’t right, 3-year-olds should be playing in the sandbox and putting together mixing bowls,’
    “When you’re putting blocks together, you’re learning how to be a physicist,” agreed Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, a psychologist at Temple University and an author of “Einstein Never Used Flash Cards.” “When you’re learning how to balance things and calculate how tall you can make your building, you’re learning how to be a physicist. Having your kid drill and kill and fill in worksheets at 2 and 3 and 4 to the best of our knowledge so far does not give your child a leg up on anything.”
    “Yes, your child might know more of his letters than the child who spent Saturday in the sandbox,” she said. “But the people who are team players, who are creative innovators, they are the ones who are going to invent the next iPad. The kids who are just memorizing are going to be outsourced to the kids in India who have memorized the same stuff.”

  • Yes they are

    Paragraphs that may be good evidence
    “The best you can say is that they’re useless,” said Alison Gopnik, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, who compared the escalation of supplemental education with Irish elk competing to see which had the biggest antlers. “The result is that they go around tottering, unable to walk, under the enormous weight of these antlers they’ve developed,” she said. “I think it’s true of American parents from high school all the way down to preschool.”
    “Age 3 is the sweet spot,” said Joseph Nativo, chief financial officer for Kumon North America. “But if they’re out of a diaper and can sit still with a Kumon instructor for 15 minutes, we will take them.”
    PARENTS pay $200 to $300 a month for their 2-, 3-, 4- or 5-year-old to spend up to an hour twice weekly being tutored at a Junior Kumon center — 20 to 30 minutes each on reading and math. Children are then expected to do 20 minutes of homework on each subject every day, with their parents guiding and grading them. Recommended reading lists start in preschool with “Goodnight Moon” and “Each Peach Pear Plum.”
    “It used to seem like a horrible thing to do to your kid — why would you force this?”
    “Part of them are saying, ‘This isn’t right, 3-year-olds should be playing in the sandbox and putting together mixing bowls,’
    “When you’re putting blocks together, you’re learning how to be a physicist,” agreed Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, a psychologist at Temple University and an author of “Einstein Never Used Flash Cards.” “When you’re learning how to balance things and calculate how tall you can make your building, you’re learning how to be a physicist. Having your kid drill and kill and fill in worksheets at 2 and 3 and 4 to the best of our knowledge so far does not give your child a leg up on anything.”
    “Yes, your child might know more of his letters than the child who spent Saturday in the sandbox,” she said. “But the people who are team players, who are creative innovators, they are the ones who are going to invent the next iPad. The kids who are just memorizing are going to be outsourced to the kids in India who have memorized the same stuff.”

  • They push to hard

    They think we have a mentality like there's . They can hang we cant. There body is use to more, we our kids kids don't have a strong mentality as they do. They think we can do what they can but thats not true!!!! Yes everything is possible but thats a bit too much

  • The children of today are being pushed too hard

    Have you seen how quickly children get angry? They are being stressed to do well far too much, pushing them over what is humanely possible, making them highly irritable. If parents continue to push their children this hard, I would hate to see what the children's attitudes are when they grow up.

  • Yes, I agree

    No one should be pushed Some kids are pushed so much that they don't want to keep on going at all. They under go to much stress and it makes school just harder for them. Some parents push to hard and make kids feel like their parents don't love them or their parents don't want them around.

  • Yes, I agree

    No one should be pushed Some kids are pushed so much that they don't want to keep on going at all. They under go to much stress and it makes school just harder for them. Some parents push to hard and make kids feel like their parents don't love them or their parents don't want them around.

  • Yes, I agree

    No one should be pushed Some kids are pushed so much that they don't want to keep on going at all. They under go to much stress and it makes school just harder for them. Some parents push to hard and make kids feel like their parents don't love them or their parents don't want them around.

  • Yes, I agree

    No one should be pushed Some kids are pushed so much that they don't want to keep on going at all. They under go to much stress and it makes school just harder for them. Some parents push to hard and make kids feel like their parents don't love them or their parents don't want them around.

  • Yes, I agree

    No one should be pushed Some kids are pushed so much that they don't want to keep on going at all. They under go to much stress and it makes school just harder for them. Some parents push to hard and make kids feel like their parents don't love them or their parents don't want them around.

  • Parents are killers

    Kids are getting so stressed out they are literally killing them selfs. Parents need to let there child have freedom but they have to help them learn to study and do there homework and chores while having fun. They also need to help them with there homework and any other school work. If they NEED it

  • They are pushing us too much!!

    What I think is that it should be hurtful to young children by pushing them to achieve. Some children commit suicide, because of parents pushing too much or getting so much stress by studying even though they don't want to study. I get that sometimes you have to study even though if you don't want to. But children need freedom, to do what they want to do!!!

  • Children NEED To BE Pushed!

    How will they ever become something without giving up on it. I mean think about it when your pushing me they go for the gold, but when you don't push them, let them go on there own then they will just fail and become nothing in life, and not having the courage to really achieve anything in life and go for it.

  • Push Your Children to Succeed

    These days, with high dropout rates and problems with the economy, it is important for parents to push their children to achieve. They need to understand that we live in a changing world, where the poorly education will have less opportunities than they ever had before. An education is imperative to their success, employment and future. Less emphasis should be placed on sports, and more emphasis on studies which will prepare them for college.

  • Children need a push.

    Adults are not hurting their children by pushing them to achieve. Adults are harming their children by not pushing them at all. Children do not understand that they need to work hard in order to support themselves as adults. This needs to be taught by the adults around them. If you do not push your child you are setting them up for failure. If parents don't push their children nobody else will.


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