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  • Yes, they are

    Which is better, board games or video games. Video games provide a 3D, interactive experience, and provide things board games can’t. Video games can make noises that a game on a table cannot. A board game can’t make things appear realistic, with plenty of things going on. The pieces of a board game are plastic/metal. But, board games can provide a more physical thing that video games don’t have. Board games can have the things all in a space, that’s always there for you. Board games have almost a guaranteed chance that it is multiplayer, which means more fun. If you get motion sick, board games work. Board games have physical things. They can be moved by the player. They aren’t on a screen, where you move things around using a stick. They don’t have glitches, because they aren’t electronic. They aren’t as addicting as video games are. So, if you ask me, I’d say “Go ask someone else”, because I am stuck in between. Also, board games have more types to choose from. Do you want board, card, etc.? And if so, how old do you want it to be? A brand new one? An old one played for centuries? Video games only have genres. Then, do you want 2D, or 3D? Do you want it to be from 20 years ago? Older? Sorry, there is none older. You see, board games has things a video game can never have. But, video games are more recent, and they are more liked. Yet, they aren’t that kid-friendly. Most board games are. Kid friendly board games: Monopoly, Scrabble, Candy Land, etc. Kid friendly video games: Minecraft(sometimes), Roblox(Sometimes), …(nothing else I can think of).

  • Of course board games are better

    Because it doesn't give any 1-7 year old children nightmares as board games don't overwhelm their brains with too much visual input. So it doesn't effect their sleep and future well being.

    Board games teach fair play, and how to be a accepting of losing and winning in a fun and friendly environment.

  • Of course board games are better

    Because it doesn't give any 1-7 year old children nightmares as board games don't overwhelm their brains with too much visual input. So it doesn't effect their sleep and future well being.

    Board games teach fair play, and how to be a accepting of losing and winning in a fun and friendly environment.

  • Hello Every Person

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  • Hello Every Person

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  • Kids can agree

    All games are fun, but when it comes to a choice, I would have to say board games all though I am a kid, nothing can beat a good game of monopoly or scrabble. If the lights go out, board games are still there to play. Also, most of the video games today are to aggressive for younger kids like a four year old. Most of all, they get addictive and can hurt the brain and eyes. When I say this, it does not mean that I don't like them, because I do, but the only excuse is a board game in a video game. This one and the last one was made by Matthew Stevenson

  • Kids can agree

    All games are fun, but when it comes to a choice, i would have to say board games. All though i am a kid, nothing can beat a good game of monopoly or scrabble. If the lights go out, board games are still there to play. Also most games now are a little to aggressive for younger kids like a four year old. Most of all, they get addictive and can hurt the brain and eyes.

  • Kids can agree

    All games are fun, but when it comes to a choice, i would have to say board games. All though i am a kid, nothing can beat a good game of monopoly or scrabble. If the lights go out, board games are still there to play. Also most games now are a little to aggressive for younger kids like a four year old. Most of all, they get addictive and can hurt the brain and eyes.

  • Boardgames provide a tactile experience

    It is true that boardgames and videogames both have advantages depending on the genre. For example, some of the best videogames are simulators, where you spend you time flying aircraft (Flight Sim), building a city (Sim City) or solving puzzles (Myst). These types of games work well because they require video-game input and clever background computing. However, on an evolutionary scale of several hundred thousand years, humans are more adapted to interacting with each other and with their physical environment than with screens (or other intermediary devices). For this reason, many boardgames will still feel better when played on the tabletop, even if a video version is available. I am thinking here of games which involve linguistic interaction and strategy (Diplomacy, Classic Warlord,) or involve adventure and immersion in which the player feels personally responsible (Resistance, Dungeonquest, Fury of Dracula, all the classic face-t-face RPGs). Also, don't forget there are plenty of games which people like me play solitaire, just for reflection and the pleasure of learning the rules (eg wargames made by GMT, Hexasim, Decision games) All of these games have video counterparts, but it is the physical presence of counters, maps, cards, dice which make the game a tangible experience. Of course, video games are graphically very sophisticated, but over the past 1à -15 years this has pushed boardgames companies to produce even more lavishly designed products (witness the cover art on many professional Euro and American-style boardgames).

  • Boardgames provide a tactile experience

    It is true that boardgames and videogames both have advantages depending on the genre. For example, some of the best videogames are simulators, where you spend you time flying aircraft (Flight Sim), building a city (Sim City) or solving puzzles (Myst). These types of games work well because they require video-game input and clever background computing. However, on an evolutionary scale of several hundred thousand years, humans are more adapted to interacting with each other and with their physical environment than with screens (or other intermediary devices). For this reason, many boardgames will still feel better when played on the tabletop, even if a video version is available. I am thinking here of games which involve linguistic interaction and strategy (Diplomacy, Classic Warlord,) or involve adventure and immersion in which the player feels personally responsible (Resistance, Dungeonquest, Fury of Dracula, all the classic face-t-face RPGs). Also, don't forget there are plenty of games which people like me play solitaire, just for reflection and the pleasure of learning the rules (eg wargames made by GMT, Hexasim, Decision games) All of these games have video counterparts, but it is the physical presence of counters, maps, cards, dice which make the game a tangible experience. Of course, video games are graphically very sophisticated, but over the past 1à -15 years this has pushed boardgames companies to produce even more lavishly designed products (witness the cover art on many professional Euro and American-style boardgames).

  • Oh hell naw!

    Are you kidding me? Are board games better then electronic games, what a dumb question to actually ask people.... NO THEYRE NOT BETTER!!!! Has there EVER been a game of monopoly that didnt end in a fight??? You need an entire weekend and no social life at all just to get through an entire game of risk, monopoly, life, etc whereas I can go through an entire season of NCAA football in half the time and still be able to hang out with friends assuming I had any..... So yes, electronic games are better then board games since most board games dont end, theres always one person who says 'man f*ck this!' and smashes the pieces everywhere,

  • Statement is too absolute

    I agree and disagree with the statement, so I must then say no. Some boardgames rock (even monopoly can be made fun and strategic with a few houserules), but they are just very different. BGs are limited in their capabilities. VGs offer things that BGs can't. VGs can simulate almost anything: warfare, sports, dance, adventure and strategy (think Zelda). There are even online VG versions of BGs, such as TripleA which offers Axis and Allies with customizable maps, rules, etc allowing for local or internet gaming against either your friends at home or against people across the world. BGs are usually more social, but I don't think that alone makes them better

  • Video games are more immersive.

    Games allow users to lose themselves in an immersive bubble. Video games are the largest industry in the world and rack in more money than all other entertainment medias combined. Games allow users to explore amazing worlds, fight monsters, demons and even Nazi zombies. Games allow users to do more than just move from one space to another they allow the user to master spells, wipe out enemies with high powerful rifles and plunder ancient tombs for treasure.

  • There not bettr

    A video game is an electronic game that involves human interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but in the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Video games are sometimes believed to be a form of art, but this designation is controversial.
    The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices. Specialized video games such as arcade games, in which the video game components are housed in a large, coin-operated chassis, while common in the 1980s, have gradually declined in use due to the widespread availability of affordable home video game devices (e.G., PlayStation 4 and Xbox One) and video games on desktop and laptop computers and smartphones.
    The input device used for games, the game controller, varies across platforms. Common controllers include gamepads, mouses, keyboards, joysticks, the touchscreens of mobile devices and buttons. Players typically view the game on a video screen or television and there are often game sounds from loudspeakers. Some games in the 2000s include haptic, vibration-creating effects or force feedback peripherals. In the 2010s, the video game industry is of increasing commercial importance, with growth driven particularly by the emerging Asian markets and mobile games. As of 2015, video games generated sales of USD 74 billion annually worldwide, and were the third-largest segment in the U.S. entertainment market, behind broadcast and cable TV.

  • There not bettr

    A video game is an electronic game that involves human interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but in the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Video games are sometimes believed to be a form of art, but this designation is controversial.
    The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices. Specialized video games such as arcade games, in which the video game components are housed in a large, coin-operated chassis, while common in the 1980s, have gradually declined in use due to the widespread availability of affordable home video game devices (e.G., PlayStation 4 and Xbox One) and video games on desktop and laptop computers and smartphones.
    The input device used for games, the game controller, varies across platforms. Common controllers include gamepads, mouses, keyboards, joysticks, the touchscreens of mobile devices and buttons. Players typically view the game on a video screen or television and there are often game sounds from loudspeakers. Some games in the 2000s include haptic, vibration-creating effects or force feedback peripherals. In the 2010s, the video game industry is of increasing commercial importance, with growth driven particularly by the emerging Asian markets and mobile games. As of 2015, video games generated sales of USD 74 billion annually worldwide, and were the third-largest segment in the U.S. entertainment market, behind broadcast and cable TV.

  • There not bettr

    A video game is an electronic game that involves human interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but in the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Video games are sometimes believed to be a form of art, but this designation is controversial.
    The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices. Specialized video games such as arcade games, in which the video game components are housed in a large, coin-operated chassis, while common in the 1980s, have gradually declined in use due to the widespread availability of affordable home video game devices (e.G., PlayStation 4 and Xbox One) and video games on desktop and laptop computers and smartphones.
    The input device used for games, the game controller, varies across platforms. Common controllers include gamepads, mouses, keyboards, joysticks, the touchscreens of mobile devices and buttons. Players typically view the game on a video screen or television and there are often game sounds from loudspeakers. Some games in the 2000s include haptic, vibration-creating effects or force feedback peripherals. In the 2010s, the video game industry is of increasing commercial importance, with growth driven particularly by the emerging Asian markets and mobile games. As of 2015, video games generated sales of USD 74 billion annually worldwide, and were the third-largest segment in the U.S. entertainment market, behind broadcast and cable TV.

  • There not bettr

    A video game is an electronic game that involves human interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but in the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Video games are sometimes believed to be a form of art, but this designation is controversial.
    The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices. Specialized video games such as arcade games, in which the video game components are housed in a large, coin-operated chassis, while common in the 1980s, have gradually declined in use due to the widespread availability of affordable home video game devices (e.G., PlayStation 4 and Xbox One) and video games on desktop and laptop computers and smartphones.
    The input device used for games, the game controller, varies across platforms. Common controllers include gamepads, mouses, keyboards, joysticks, the touchscreens of mobile devices and buttons. Players typically view the game on a video screen or television and there are often game sounds from loudspeakers. Some games in the 2000s include haptic, vibration-creating effects or force feedback peripherals. In the 2010s, the video game industry is of increasing commercial importance, with growth driven particularly by the emerging Asian markets and mobile games. As of 2015, video games generated sales of USD 74 billion annually worldwide, and were the third-largest segment in the U.S. entertainment market, behind broadcast and cable TV.

  • There not bettr

    A video game is an electronic game that involves human interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but in the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Video games are sometimes believed to be a form of art, but this designation is controversial.
    The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices. Specialized video games such as arcade games, in which the video game components are housed in a large, coin-operated chassis, while common in the 1980s, have gradually declined in use due to the widespread availability of affordable home video game devices (e.G., PlayStation 4 and Xbox One) and video games on desktop and laptop computers and smartphones.
    The input device used for games, the game controller, varies across platforms. Common controllers include gamepads, mouses, keyboards, joysticks, the touchscreens of mobile devices and buttons. Players typically view the game on a video screen or television and there are often game sounds from loudspeakers. Some games in the 2000s include haptic, vibration-creating effects or force feedback peripherals. In the 2010s, the video game industry is of increasing commercial importance, with growth driven particularly by the emerging Asian markets and mobile games. As of 2015, video games generated sales of USD 74 billion annually worldwide, and were the third-largest segment in the U.S. entertainment market, behind broadcast and cable TV.

  • There not bettr

    A video game is an electronic game that involves human interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but in the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Video games are sometimes believed to be a form of art, but this designation is controversial.
    The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices. Specialized video games such as arcade games, in which the video game components are housed in a large, coin-operated chassis, while common in the 1980s, have gradually declined in use due to the widespread availability of affordable home video game devices (e.G., PlayStation 4 and Xbox One) and video games on desktop and laptop computers and smartphones.
    The input device used for games, the game controller, varies across platforms. Common controllers include gamepads, mouses, keyboards, joysticks, the touchscreens of mobile devices and buttons. Players typically view the game on a video screen or television and there are often game sounds from loudspeakers. Some games in the 2000s include haptic, vibration-creating effects or force feedback peripherals. In the 2010s, the video game industry is of increasing commercial importance, with growth driven particularly by the emerging Asian markets and mobile games. As of 2015, video games generated sales of USD 74 billion annually worldwide, and were the third-largest segment in the U.S. entertainment market, behind broadcast and cable TV.

  • There not bettr

    A video game is an electronic game that involves human interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device, but in the 2000s, it implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. Video games are sometimes believed to be a form of art, but this designation is controversial.
    The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices. Specialized video games such as arcade games, in which the video game components are housed in a large, coin-operated chassis, while common in the 1980s, have gradually declined in use due to the widespread availability of affordable home video game devices (e.G., PlayStation 4 and Xbox One) and video games on desktop and laptop computers and smartphones.
    The input device used for games, the game controller, varies across platforms. Common controllers include gamepads, mouses, keyboards, joysticks, the touchscreens of mobile devices and buttons. Players typically view the game on a video screen or television and there are often game sounds from loudspeakers. Some games in the 2000s include haptic, vibration-creating effects or force feedback peripherals. In the 2010s, the video game industry is of increasing commercial importance, with growth driven particularly by the emerging Asian markets and mobile games. As of 2015, video games generated sales of USD 74 billion annually worldwide, and were the third-largest segment in the U.S. entertainment market, behind broadcast and cable TV.


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