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  • They are cold

    Look, we British may live through some cold winters, but so does the rest of the world. Why would you ever think we are cold? Britain has just as many warm, even boiling hot days as people in America do. British people are cold. So is part of the other rest of the world.

  • No Emotions Please

    The English can be hilariously witty, enterain to perfection, excell in literature and poetry and fortify you with cheerfulness in times of adversity. If you, however, are looking for empathy, nurturing or loyal friendship, best look elsewhere. They 'soldier' on regardless of individual sentiments and bloody well expect the same from everyone else.

  • No Emotions Please

    The English can be hilariously witty, enterain to perfection, excell in literature and poetry and fortify you with cheerfulness in times of adversity. If you, however, are looking for empathy, nurturing or loyal friendship, best look elsewhere. They 'soldier' on regardless of individual sentiments and bloody well expect the same from everyone else.

  • They definitely are

    My parents are British but I grew up in several South East Asian countries until I was 18. I moved to the Uk for university, and honestly after 4 years of being here, I have to agree with the stereotype that British people are cold and standoffish. For the first two years, I wondered if people didn't like me very much, cause nobody seemed to want to actually commit to a proper friendship. It turns out that people did actually like me as a person, but their idea of friendship was just very different to mine. Theirs is a lot less emotional, and more limited to watching tv, football, drinking, maybe playing board games etc. Basically anything that removes the need for direct personal conversations! I've also noticed a lot of British people don't tend to be very passionate during discussions - it's almost like they're afraid of showing too much excitement or anger? So I often make people uncomfortable by being too honest or straightforward. This was really difficult to adjust to - I just had to get used to the fact that people were unlikely to show much affection or speak plainly.

  • Generally yes. They are islands on an island.

    I am an Italian woman and have lived in the UK for 13 years now. I know some amazing British people, open minded, kind, curious, helpful, smart, funny. But I also regularly meet a relatively high number of people who are socially un-skillled, don't shake your hand or tell their name when they are introduced, and stand-offish and clearly look like they can't be bothered getting to know me, maybe because I am a foreigner. Some women in particular often feel like aliens to me: indifferent, cold, detached, impersonal, almost bothered I exist. I find this alienating and has put me off trying to make friends with most English women. There is some strange barrier that they put up, either for fear or sense of superiority perhaps. But as mentioned I also know amazing people - and yes, they tend to be the ones who have traveled.

  • Guarded, reserved women

    I am a girl, I live in Britain, and I have the impression that British girls don't like me. They are extremely reserved/guarded. As if, they just don't care. However, a few years ago, I worked with four British women that moved to my country, and they were just fabulous.

  • Controlled behaviour avoiding any vulnerability or connection

    Visiting England always angers and depresses me. They behave so coldly and rudely that I feel miserable there. I can't understand the robotic monotone intonation of southern England. It's like they're programmed not to show emotion or personality. Is it a cultural fear of showing weakness through vulnerability? I only know that the only friendly people I have met in SE have been foreigners. Sad

  • Not opened to the world.

    I have spent one year of study in North East England. The warmest people I've met were the ones who travelled quite a lot in their lives and interacted with the locals in the countries they visited and the other ones were the Scottish (who have a much worse weather in their land so the excuse of bad weather making people cold is not valid at all for me). The English are very polite, patient and love jokes, but they act like they are afraid of friendship, getting to know new people. In London I thought it was different, they are used to the vast diversity of people, to crowded places so I definitely felt home in London but not in the rest of England.

  • From my experience, there are more socially awkward 'adults' in England than anywhere I've ever lived

    I've been living and working here for 4 years, I hate generalisations, but I must say there is some truth to this statement.
    As a teacher however, teaching British kids for 4 years, I must say that I've failed to find such traits in my teenage students, who tend to be much more friendly than I remember being myself at their age.. Hence this question that I always ask myself :'at what stage of their lives do the start becoming so emotionally retarded and socially inept' and why on earth does that even occur ?

  • They will be cold and distant depending of your "status".

    My sister is living here for about 12 years. Many friends, the only one who has english as a first language is an Irish person, the rest, the bloody foreigners are her friends.

    My situation, almost 4 years in the UK, I think I can say I have only one English friend, I was really surprised he invited me to play football with his friends and he introduced me to his family and showed his house. I appreciated a lot, because I was feeling as if I was a monster in the UK. He was my supervisor where we worked together. Many years ago I have welcomed 2 English people in Brazil for one week and I treated them as VIP in my house. I do regret because I asked them what they wanted for the breakfast and I bought all the stuff for them.

    What I noticed is: if you are an immigrant here, most of them (60/70%) will behave as cold as the winter in siberia. (in one of the companies I worked, one employee treated me as a criminal, always presuming I was doing something wrong). It hurts a lot. The ones who will be more open minded are the ones who already have travelled and lived abroad, and know other cultures. I have the impression that people from Essex are nicer, but even so, they will scrutinise you, "walking around the house" but you are never good enough. Many of them, won't trust what you are saying is correct until they realise they are wrong. It's sad.

    For the ones who think the weather will play a role in the way people are. It's wrong. Irish people are nicer and friendly, and the weather there is even worse.

    When I go in events, parties, or social events, such as tennis matches, competitions, and they ask me or they presume that I am here as a "passenger", I always joke and say: I am an immigrant and I live here, I am sorry. In this case they don't understand my British humour.

    I used to like them at the beginning, but now, I am starting to be scared to socialise with them and becoming more distant due what I have experienced, that's why I say straight away, I am an immigrant and I live here. They don't have to waste their precious time asking me other questions. I give them a clear picture and they leave me. Easy peasy.

  • Only by American standards

    I'm British and I'd say we're very passionate people. I suppose it's relative. Italians would no doubt disagree. However the majority of what the world are exposed to are the upper class Brits and I would say that as a general rule they're less passionate irrelevant of nationality.

    The world, especially Americans, are not exposed to the cockneys (working class londoners) the scousers (working class people from liverpool) or the essex girls (basically our version or new jersey girls)

    You only have to watch a football match to see that the majority of the British are not cold at all. That being said we tend to be less emotional than Americans. It's actually a bit of a joke that if someone cries a lot, even in situations like a funeral, to brighten the mood, someone might say "okay that's enough of that we're not American"

  • Why would they be cold?

    True, British people live way up North and that may seem like Alaska to a lot of people, but they are not cold. They are such kind people and are actually pretty warm. I have hugged many British people, considering I travel a lot and have to travel to Europe a lot. So no, they are not cold. They actually are very good to warm yourself if your cold. I would know.

  • Of course not!

    Look, we British may live through some cold winters, but so does the rest of the world. Why would you ever think we are cold? Britain has just as many warm, even boiling hot days as people in America do. British people are not cold!!!

    And I hope no-one answers yes to this ridiculous question.

  • Many British people are naturally reserved but that’s not the same as cold.

    I notice when I visit America that I am, in comparison, generally quieter and less forthcoming than the locals but that doesn’t mean I am being unfriendly. I was always taught never to impose myself on other people, verbally or physically, as that is considered the height of bad manners in Britain. Furthermore, I would never enter into casual conversation with strangers without being invited to do so, but that is just about respecting other people’s privacy.

  • Only by American Standards

    I'm British and I'd say we're very passionate people. I suppose it's relative. Italians would no doubt disagree. However the majority of what the world is exposed to are the upper class Brits and I would say that as a general rule they're less passionate irrelevant of nationality.

    You only have to attend a football match ( and I do mean football, as in a game that's played with a foot and a ball) to realise that the British are passionate.

    It seems like when people think of the British they think of a cartoonish, moustached gentleman from the 1800's. They don't think of Russell Brand or Benny Hill or Amy Winehouse or Mick Jagger or basically any decent Rock Star.

    Yes we have snobs but overall I'd say Brits are kind of whacky characters when I think about it.

    That being said we are not generally as emotional as Americans. In fact a friend of mine often jokes when someone cries, even once at a funeral to lighten the mood, "come on now that's enough of the mushy stuff we're not Americans!"

    At the end of the day most national stereotypes are about 100 years old. These days most westerners are pretty much the same.


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Rabid.Penguin says2013-10-21T22:12:12.647
Lol. Two answers so far. Both no. Both taking completely different meanings of the word "cold" :)