Amazon.com Widgets
  • They do stuff

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  • Brains turn to mush

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  • Brains turn to mush

    Dshf gfy jdf dgj df hfhdghf hg hdsf ghd g fg sfg asgd fhg sdfg shdgf hs gfhjsf gs fdh fsghfg kdhfgahsdfg ashdgf hasdgf hsadg fg ashdfgd ahs fhsdfg shgfhsga fg afghjabdg hfa hgf ghasd fghsd dfhjsagf h zsh gf h ahgf hg fhgsdfhgd h gf gahsdfs hsdga fh sha

  • Brains turn to mush

    Dshf gfy jdf dgj df hfhdghf hg hdsf ghd g fg sfg asgd fhg sdfg shdgf hs gfhjsf gs fdh fsghfg kdhfgahsdfg ashdgf hasdgf hsadg fg ashdfgd ahs fhsdfg shgfhsga fg afghjabdg hfa hgf ghasd fghsd dfhjsagf h zsh gf h ahgf hg fhgsdfhgd h gf gahsdfs hsdga fh sha

  • Brains turn to mush

    Dshf gfy jdf dgj df hfhdghf hg hdsf ghd g fg sfg asgd fhg sdfg shdgf hs gfhjsf gs fdh fsghfg kdhfgahsdfg ashdgf hasdgf hsadg fg ashdfgd ahs fhsdfg shgfhsga fg afghjabdg hfa hgf ghasd fghsd dfhjsagf h zsh gf h ahgf hg fhgsdfhgd h gf gahsdfs hsdga fh sha

  • Brains turn to mush

    Dshf gfy jdf dgj df hfhdghf hg hdsf ghd g fg sfg asgd fhg sdfg shdgf hs gfhjsf gs fdh fsghfg kdhfgahsdfg ashdgf hasdgf hsadg fg ashdfgd ahs fhsdfg shgfhsga fg afghjabdg hfa hgf ghasd fghsd dfhjsagf h zsh gf h ahgf hg fhgsdfhgd h gf gahsdfs hsdga fh sha

  • Brains turn to mush

    Dshf gfy jdf dgj df hfhdghf hg hdsf ghd g fg sfg asgd fhg sdfg shdgf hs gfhjsf gs fdh fsghfg kdhfgahsdfg ashdgf hasdgf hsadg fg ashdfgd ahs fhsdfg shgfhsga fg afghjabdg hfa hgf ghasd fghsd dfhjsagf h zsh gf h ahgf hg fhgsdfhgd h gf gahsdfs hsdga fh sha

  • Hi u e

    Uuytiujyt tyuuuuuuuuuuu uuuu yu uy y uyu y y uyyy y yyyyyy y yy yy yyyyt6i i like chiken ha ha ughfg ig tjygtjihiyutijihj uu uu uu uu uu uu uuhhhhhh uhhh uh uh uh uh ha hah k k k k k k k k k k k k k k kk

  • Yes they are harmful

    Children are becoming weaker, less muscular and unable to do physical tasks that previous generations found simple, research has revealed.
    As a generation dedicated to online pursuits grows up, 10-year-olds can do fewer sit-ups and are less able to hang from wall bars in a gym. Arm strength has declined in that age group, as has their ability to grip an object firmly.
    The findings, published in the child health journal Acta Paediatrica, have led to fresh concern about the impact on children's health caused by the shift away from outdoor activities.
    Academics led by Dr Gavin Sandercock, a children's fitness expert at Essex University, studied how strong a group of 315 Essex 10-year-olds in 2008 were compared with 309 children the same age in 1998. They found that:
    ■ The number of sit-ups 10-year-olds can do declined by 27.1% between 1998 and 2008
    ■ Arm strength fell by 26% and grip strength by 7%
    ■ While one in 20 children in 1998 could not hold their own weight when hanging from wall bars, one in 10 could not do so in 2008.
    "This is probably due to changes in activity patterns among English 10-year-olds, such as taking part in fewer activities like rope-climbing in PE and tree-climbing for fun," Sandercock said. "Typically, these activities boosted children's strength, making them able to lift and hold their own bodyweight."
    The fact that 10% could not do the wall bars test and another 10% refused to try was "really shocking", he added. "That probably shows that climbing and holding their own weight was something they hadn't done before."
    Previous research has already shown that children are becoming more unfit, less active and more sedentary and, in many cases, heavier than before.
    But the new study also found that children in 2008 had the same body mass index (BMI) as those a decade earlier. Lead author Daniel Cohen, of London Metropolitan University, said this meant that, given their declining strength, the bodies of the recent test group are likely to contain more fat and less muscle then their predecessors. "That's really worrying from a health point of view. It's good news that their BMI hasn't risen, but worrying that pound for pound they're weaker and probably carrying more fat," said Sandercock.
    The authors want ministers to reduce their reliance on the National Child Measurement Programme, which surveys primary schoolchildren's BMI, and introduce fitness testing in all schools – a call made last year by the then-chief medical officer, Sir Liam Donaldson.
    "Climbing trees and ropes used to be standard practice for children, but school authorities and 'health and safety' have contrived to knock the sap out of our children," said Tam Fry of the Child Growth Foundation.
    "Falling off a branch used to be a good lesson in picking yourself up and learning to climb better. Now fear of litigation stops the child climbing in the first place."

  • Yes they are harmful

    Children are becoming weaker, less muscular and unable to do physical tasks that previous generations found simple, research has revealed.
    As a generation dedicated to online pursuits grows up, 10-year-olds can do fewer sit-ups and are less able to hang from wall bars in a gym. Arm strength has declined in that age group, as has their ability to grip an object firmly.
    The findings, published in the child health journal Acta Paediatrica, have led to fresh concern about the impact on children's health caused by the shift away from outdoor activities.
    Academics led by Dr Gavin Sandercock, a children's fitness expert at Essex University, studied how strong a group of 315 Essex 10-year-olds in 2008 were compared with 309 children the same age in 1998. They found that:
    ■ The number of sit-ups 10-year-olds can do declined by 27.1% between 1998 and 2008
    ■ Arm strength fell by 26% and grip strength by 7%
    ■ While one in 20 children in 1998 could not hold their own weight when hanging from wall bars, one in 10 could not do so in 2008.
    "This is probably due to changes in activity patterns among English 10-year-olds, such as taking part in fewer activities like rope-climbing in PE and tree-climbing for fun," Sandercock said. "Typically, these activities boosted children's strength, making them able to lift and hold their own bodyweight."
    The fact that 10% could not do the wall bars test and another 10% refused to try was "really shocking", he added. "That probably shows that climbing and holding their own weight was something they hadn't done before."
    Previous research has already shown that children are becoming more unfit, less active and more sedentary and, in many cases, heavier than before.
    But the new study also found that children in 2008 had the same body mass index (BMI) as those a decade earlier. Lead author Daniel Cohen, of London Metropolitan University, said this meant that, given their declining strength, the bodies of the recent test group are likely to contain more fat and less muscle then their predecessors. "That's really worrying from a health point of view. It's good news that their BMI hasn't risen, but worrying that pound for pound they're weaker and probably carrying more fat," said Sandercock.
    The authors want ministers to reduce their reliance on the National Child Measurement Programme, which surveys primary schoolchildren's BMI, and introduce fitness testing in all schools – a call made last year by the then-chief medical officer, Sir Liam Donaldson.
    "Climbing trees and ropes used to be standard practice for children, but school authorities and 'health and safety' have contrived to knock the sap out of our children," said Tam Fry of the Child Growth Foundation.
    "Falling off a branch used to be a good lesson in picking yourself up and learning to climb better. Now fear of litigation stops the child climbing in the first place."

  • I want breakfast

    I WANT THE EGGS, THE CHEESE AND DEM HAM. BUT MAKE THE FRENCH TOAST THE CRUNCHY. KK SO PUT THE syirp on the eggs . OH NOSE I FORGOT TO HAVE DEM BACON SOMAKE ME DEM BACON KKKKKKKKK CAUSE I WANT THE CAT ON THE STOVE TO MAKE THE EGGS CAUSE HES A RAT CHEIF. KK YOU BETTER MAKE MY BREAKFAST GOOD K.

  • No, they are not harmful.

    They are the current pinnacle of human technology and interaction. Nothing is perfect, and there will always be problems and people who abuse the Internet and technology. There is not a single invention in this world which has been abused or optimized for something bad, and the only reason problems related to computers seem more large is that computers and the Internet are one of the most widely used and utilized invention on the planet, like the wheel and the battery, etc.

  • Computers are not harmful, they are the current evolution of informational gathering, logging, and communication.

    Technology exists to make something easier, or more efficient, and possibly both. Computers are there to help people gather information, store information, and with the Internet communicate. They are just the current evolution of things, even before this you would use pen and paper, calculators, encyclopedias, dictionaries, to do the same things one computer could cover. In regards to communication the Internet just replaced letters to each other. So they are beneficial if anything.

  • No, Computers are not harmful

    Because internet is optional. Also, to become victim to any of the issues that may be involved with the internet you have to be the one to fall for the fraud. Fraud has been around almost as long as farming humans should be taught not to fall for fraud in their social studies classes. Just because a few people are care free and fall for major issues doesn't mean something is harmful. You can say that Hot Coffee is harmful and have a debate with that logic. Sure it can be harmful if used as a weapon or if handled by someone who isn't' educated in its purpose such as a small child.

    Overall, the internet is only harmful to people who make themselves open to danger. Talk to any information security expert and they will inform you that the biggest danger to any company or computer system is the users that are controlling the system. The tool is not dangerous the person wielding it is.


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