Amazon.com Widgets

Are electronic books for eco-friendly than traditional, paper books?

  • No, electronic books aren't as green as you think.

    Yes, electronic books may be more eco friendly than paper books as their carbon footprint is lesser, but how about the device footprint?Factoring in the carbon footprint of an eReader drastically changes the comparison. One year of reading eBooks accounts for a carbon footprint five times greater than a year’s worth of print books.
    Fans of eReaders will of course refute this data by claiming that their devices level out with — and could even become “greener” than — print books on a long enough timeline.Sam Jordison on the Guardian Books Blog meditates on the eco-friendliness of e-books. He mentions a study on the Kindle that estimates a Kindle produces “roughly 168 kg” of carbon dioxide during its lifetime, whereas a single book produces about 7.46 kg—meaning that a Kindle equals about 22.5 books. So once a Kindle has kept someone from buying 23 paper books, the carbon dioxide savings begin.

    The author of the study also claims that "a physical book purchased by a person driving to the bookstore creates twice the emissions of a book purchased online." She also notes that e-books could save a lot of carbon dioxide when it comes to replacing textbooks, given that textbooks tend to last only a couple of years before being replaced by new editions.

    Of course, there is more than one measure of environmental friendliness; e-books may use less carbon, but e-book devices may be made with toxic materials. And carbon aside, books are made from a renewable resource—lumber companies usually plant two new trees for every one they cut down.

    I wonder what might happen if e-books ever do displace a significant amount of printed books. Will a ripple effect cause a lot of unemployment in the lumber industry as there is less demand for paper? Probably not something we need to worry about for a long time.

  • Yes, electronic books are more eco-friendly than paper books.

    Over a long enough timescale, electronic books will be more eco-friendly than paper books. The obvious environmental disadvantages of e-books are the costs of production. It takes a lot more energy (and thus a lot more pollution assuming coal powered energy is used) to make an e-book. However, the pollution caused by production is a one time event. That single e-book reader can replace thousands of printed books in its lifetime and save the paper used to print those books, the energy cost of producing those books, and the pollution from shipping those books.

  • Yes, electronic books reduce resources used.

    Electronic books can be considered far more environmentally friendly than traditional paper books for several reasons. First, no paper is being used to create electronic books versus a lot of paper being used to create thousands or even millions of physical copies of a book. Second, the devices needed to read electronic books are very power efficient and can last for many years.

  • Only need on Kindle.

    Yes, electronic books are more eco-friendly than traditional, paper books, because electronic books can easily be recycled. No trees have to be cut down for an e-book. Rather, you can just download it. There are unlimited downloads, all without ever killing a tree. There is little energy used compared to chopping down a tree.

  • Of Course They Are

    Traditional paper books require us to cut down trees to make paper. Electronic books can be passed around and shared without using anything more than some electricity. I think it is obvious that e-books are more eco-friendly, but that doesn't mean we should abandon paper books all together. I think we should still print, just in smaller quantities.

  • No, ebooks may not be as green as u think

    Sam Jordison on the Guardian Books Blog meditates on the eco-friendliness of e-books. He mentions a study on the Kindle that estimates a Kindle produces “roughly 168 kg” of carbon dioxide during its lifetime, whereas a single book produces about 7.46 kg—meaning that a Kindle equals about 22.5 books. So once a Kindle has kept someone from buying 23 paper books, the carbon dioxide savings begin.

    The author of the study also claims that "a physical book purchased by a person driving to the bookstore creates twice the emissions of a book purchased online." She also notes that e-books could save a lot of carbon dioxide when it comes to replacing textbooks, given that textbooks tend to last only a couple of years before being replaced by new editions.

    Of course, there is more than one measure of environmental friendliness; e-books may use less carbon, but e-book devices may be made with toxic materials. And carbon aside, books are made from a renewable resource—lumber companies usually plant two new trees for every one they cut down.

    I wonder what might happen if e-books ever do displace a significant amount of printed books. Will a ripple effect cause a lot of unemployment in the lumber industry as there is less demand for paper? Probably not something we need to worry about for a long time.


Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.