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  • Yes, that's humans at our most basic level

    When we humans, are brought down to our most basic selfs, with no house, no car, no clothes, we automatically revert back to our animal instincts. These instincts tell us to fight for survival. Our instincts have no morals and tell us to do anything to survive. So are humans inherently evil? If you define evil as doing things without morals and with no care for who you hurt in the process then yes, humans are inherently evil.

  • Facebook As an Example

    I never would have even thought that people could be inherently evil but after having participated in groups on Facebook, I now believe that perhaps a majority of humans are, if not evil, at least nasty to the core. There is no way to have a decent debate without others attacking personally rather than just stating their opinion. I have a group on Facebook with over 2,000 members and I am just appalled at the way they try so hard to name-call, bully, berate and just simply be mean to others who they really don't even know.

    I'm almost 63 years old and I never cease to be amazed at how nasty and mean so many people are.

  • Humans are Animals

    The animal world is rife with examples of survival of the fittest and competitive violence. Human beings are at their core simply animals, prone to the same vices of competition, whether it be for better shelter, a better mate, or more chance of survibving by havinga better lifestyle. Some may argue that animals are not greedy, but there is evidence to suggest that many primates, canines, felines, and other animals do display greed, and at times even sadistic tendencies. Humans are vulnerable to commiting atrocities such as genocide and rape, and while not every human will do these things, the potential, in the right circumstances, even if only to survive, they might.

  • Twins fight in the womb

    Apparently, our instinct to stay alive and compete for resources starts early… really early. Recently, high-clarity MRIs have shown twins fighting for space in the womb by kicking and pushing their sibling out of the way. Doctors initially planned to use the MRIs to study a different “selfish” condition, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, where one identical twin siphons blood away from the other. If stealing blood wasn’t bad enough, in cases of vanishing twin syndrome, a fetus will absorb their weaker uterine companion until it miscarries or simply “vanishes”—a legitimate survival of the fittest situation.In truth, the twin who’s making off with the extra blood or nutrients isn’t consciously choosing to “steal” from his womb-mate, yet it’s interesting to see how even as fetuses we have to properly balance the available resources if everyone is to survive.
    When it comes down to it, all our seemingly violent or egocentric impulses may be ingrained survival instincts. In other words, we’ll do what’s necessary to stay alive and make conditions more comfortable for ourselves. In our modern world some of these self-centered instincts are likely unnecessary

  • Twins fight in the womb

    Apparently, our instinct to stay alive and compete for resources starts early… really early. Recently, high-clarity MRIs have shown twins fighting for space in the womb by kicking and pushing their sibling out of the way. Doctors initially planned to use the MRIs to study a different “selfish” condition, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, where one identical twin siphons blood away from the other. If stealing blood wasn’t bad enough, in cases of vanishing twin syndrome, a fetus will absorb their weaker uterine companion until it miscarries or simply “vanishes”—a legitimate survival of the fittest situation.In truth, the twin who’s making off with the extra blood or nutrients isn’t consciously choosing to “steal” from his womb-mate, yet it’s interesting to see how even as fetuses we have to properly balance the available resources if everyone is to survive.
    When it comes down to it, all our seemingly violent or egocentric impulses may be ingrained survival instincts. In other words, we’ll do what’s necessary to stay alive and make conditions more comfortable for ourselves. In our modern world some of these self-centered instincts are likely unnecessary

  • Twins fight in the womb

    Apparently, our instinct to stay alive and compete for resources starts early… really early. Recently, high-clarity MRIs have shown twins fighting for space in the womb by kicking and pushing their sibling out of the way. Doctors initially planned to use the MRIs to study a different “selfish” condition, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, where one identical twin siphons blood away from the other. If stealing blood wasn’t bad enough, in cases of vanishing twin syndrome, a fetus will absorb their weaker uterine companion until it miscarries or simply “vanishes”—a legitimate survival of the fittest situation.In truth, the twin who’s making off with the extra blood or nutrients isn’t consciously choosing to “steal” from his womb-mate, yet it’s interesting to see how even as fetuses we have to properly balance the available resources if everyone is to survive.
    When it comes down to it, all our seemingly violent or egocentric impulses may be ingrained survival instincts. In other words, we’ll do what’s necessary to stay alive and make conditions more comfortable for ourselves. In our modern world some of these self-centered instincts are likely unnecessary

  • Twins fight in the womb

    Apparently, our instinct to stay alive and compete for resources starts early… really early. Recently, high-clarity MRIs have shown twins fighting for space in the womb by kicking and pushing their sibling out of the way. Doctors initially planned to use the MRIs to study a different “selfish” condition, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, where one identical twin siphons blood away from the other. If stealing blood wasn’t bad enough, in cases of vanishing twin syndrome, a fetus will absorb their weaker uterine companion until it miscarries or simply “vanishes”—a legitimate survival of the fittest situation.In truth, the twin who’s making off with the extra blood or nutrients isn’t consciously choosing to “steal” from his womb-mate, yet it’s interesting to see how even as fetuses we have to properly balance the available resources if everyone is to survive.
    When it comes down to it, all our seemingly violent or egocentric impulses may be ingrained survival instincts. In other words, we’ll do what’s necessary to stay alive and make conditions more comfortable for ourselves. In our modern world some of these self-centered instincts are likely unnecessary

  • Twins fight in the womb

    Apparently, our instinct to stay alive and compete for resources starts early… really early. Recently, high-clarity MRIs have shown twins fighting for space in the womb by kicking and pushing their sibling out of the way. Doctors initially planned to use the MRIs to study a different “selfish” condition, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, where one identical twin siphons blood away from the other. If stealing blood wasn’t bad enough, in cases of vanishing twin syndrome, a fetus will absorb their weaker uterine companion until it miscarries or simply “vanishes”—a legitimate survival of the fittest situation.In truth, the twin who’s making off with the extra blood or nutrients isn’t consciously choosing to “steal” from his womb-mate, yet it’s interesting to see how even as fetuses we have to properly balance the available resources if everyone is to survive.
    When it comes down to it, all our seemingly violent or egocentric impulses may be ingrained survival instincts. In other words, we’ll do what’s necessary to stay alive and make conditions more comfortable for ourselves. In our modern world some of these self-centered instincts are likely unnecessary

  • Twins fight in the womb

    Apparently, our instinct to stay alive and compete for resources starts early… really early. Recently, high-clarity MRIs have shown twins fighting for space in the womb by kicking and pushing their sibling out of the way. Doctors initially planned to use the MRIs to study a different “selfish” condition, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, where one identical twin siphons blood away from the other. If stealing blood wasn’t bad enough, in cases of vanishing twin syndrome, a fetus will absorb their weaker uterine companion until it miscarries or simply “vanishes”—a legitimate survival of the fittest situation.In truth, the twin who’s making off with the extra blood or nutrients isn’t consciously choosing to “steal” from his womb-mate, yet it’s interesting to see how even as fetuses we have to properly balance the available resources if everyone is to survive.
    When it comes down to it, all our seemingly violent or egocentric impulses may be ingrained survival instincts. In other words, we’ll do what’s necessary to stay alive and make conditions more comfortable for ourselves. In our modern world some of these self-centered instincts are likely unnecessary

  • Twins fight in the womb

    Apparently, our instinct to stay alive and compete for resources starts early… really early. Recently, high-clarity MRIs have shown twins fighting for space in the womb by kicking and pushing their sibling out of the way. Doctors initially planned to use the MRIs to study a different “selfish” condition, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, where one identical twin siphons blood away from the other. If stealing blood wasn’t bad enough, in cases of vanishing twin syndrome, a fetus will absorb their weaker uterine companion until it miscarries or simply “vanishes”—a legitimate survival of the fittest situation.In truth, the twin who’s making off with the extra blood or nutrients isn’t consciously choosing to “steal” from his womb-mate, yet it’s interesting to see how even as fetuses we have to properly balance the available resources if everyone is to survive.
    When it comes down to it, all our seemingly violent or egocentric impulses may be ingrained survival instincts. In other words, we’ll do what’s necessary to stay alive and make conditions more comfortable for ourselves. In our modern world some of these self-centered instincts are likely unnecessary

  • The dominant species on earth

    In response to humans are animals, yes, humans commit crimes, but not of all them. There are those that are working very hard to protect the peace and prosperity of the human race. We had men like Gandhi, Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the prophets, Saladin Al Ayubi, Lionheart, Abraham Lincoln, Churchill, Albert Einstein, and many others that shaped humanity. Where we stand today using all this technology is evidence of kindness, sharing and caring for all the humans to see and a trait not found in the animal kingdom by any other species, to work in large groups for the benefit of their own society. If humans were inherently evil, from their millions of years of survival and history, I bet that they would not survive 100 years. Yes, a few men commit crimes, but no one is born evil, but rather innocent. It's the society around them and their livelihood that makes them what they are. If it was a born trait I would not be defending human kindness and progress, I would be busy watching the world burn!

  • Good and evil are concepts created by humans

    The duality of good and evil is one of the most basic distinctions we as humans beings have ever created in our species' exitance and it has proved to be very effective in our survival. With the concept of evil, aggressive human beings were punished more in society for not cooperating with the group and their genes that made them more aggressive began to disappear from society. The idea of anything being good or evil outside of our our minds is ridiculous. Animals, plants and microscopic organisms all compete over resources and some of them resort to violent methods to ensure their survival, but we all turn a blind eye to that. I am not saying we should condone what our society has deemed evil, as again, punishing violent people is beneficial to our mutual survival. But still, I think we need to be honest with ourselves and realize that the reason we claim some people or actions are evil is not because there is some essterical moral law, but rather because we possess a deep primial fear of said people/actions.

  • Surviving is not evil

    I realize this general point was made already, but I thought I'd reiterate it. Human beings are not evil. The actions of humans are based on the desire to survive. People say humans are inherently evil because they have been killing each other in wars for centuries, but these wars are based on desires to survive. Some of our survival instincts may be skewed by different factors. A child who grows up wealthy may buy into the misconception that excessive wealth is required for survival, so if he commits "evil" acts in his pursuit of this wealth, he is simply doing so to survive. Therefore, a human being is neither good nor evil but is engrained with the relentless pursuit of survival. Based on the environment this person is born into, they may act in a way that others perceive as evil, but are simply acting to survive.

  • Society makes us evil.

    We are all born innocent, children who haven't committed any sort of crime. Society is what turns most of us. Racism, discrimination and bullying is present everywhere and there is no way to escape it, unless you lock yourself in a small room with just your thoughts. What i am saying is that most men are evil but not inherently evil, as we grow in society we hear more than we should and listen more than we should.

  • Nobody is born evil

    Nobody is born evil, our future can only be decided by the way we were raised. Competition is in everybody's lives, lions must compete against zebras for food. Even though humans have created technology and made our lives easier, we start abusing our power and think we can do anything just because we can. Humans have the ability to be kind-hearted people, but we just chose to be the most savage, and selfish creatures.

  • No, the main argument is that we are having this discussion. If mankind was evil we would have never made it this far.

    We have schools, businesses, a working society even though they are flawed. If mankind were evil, we wouldn't have been able to make it past the stone age. There are Hitler's and Ted bundy's and there will always be people in the world, but we cant let the few become the rule. Being selfish is not the same as being evil. If my plane goes down and I open the exit door and get out, that is selfish. If I get out and close the door behind me, that is evil. This should be a "Is mankind inherently good or bad" because good is mild while evil is extreme

  • Humans are naturally self-prioritized beings.

    Human nature, in its rawest form, is to preserve the self. Whether it be a "good" or "evil" choice, when confronted with a decision, human instinct is to make the choice that furthers the self. So no, humans aren't inherently good or evil. Evolution states that the "fittest" will survive, and our natural instincts are to be the fittest, whether that action is evil or not.

  • Evil is a choice

    Your choices can be changed depending on what you tell yourself to do. Evil is not permanent. No one is perfect, things happen that could be bad, yes, but that does not mean that they can't change their ways and opinions. There is much evil in the world, but it's not everywhere and not everyone is evil.

  • It's easier to not be evil

    We have to work to be evil. It's instinctively easier to trust and do good. The obvious exception being those who are mentally ill and evil. But, they are in a large minority. The niceness that occurs consistently on a daily basis is more common, easier and proves we are moreso the ooposite of evil.

  • Morality is inherent in all men.

    Immanuelle Kant's writings teach that morality (or good an evil) is not something created by our brain, nor something that is found in society. Rather, the knowledge of the difference between good and evil is inherent in all human beings. When something is wrong, it just FEELS wrong. We know deep down inside that stealing is wrong, that rape and murder are not okay. Having said that, I believe that culture and intellect propagate these feelings, so without a proper education and a culture of high quality, one may lose their ability to tell right from wrong. In a culture that glorifies violence, objectifies women, and worships currency, it's no wonder that most people are incapable of knowing right from wrong.


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Anonymous says2013-05-08T01:49:35.683
I agree with this post we can be evil if we want