Are school dress codes more distracting then the clothing itself?

Asked by: baileyjo
  • Yasssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss they are

    Yolo yolo yolo yolo they are cuz they stoopid and dumb lke wat eva ii i i i i iii iiiii i i ii i ii i i i i i i i i ii ii i ii i hate them a lot and they r dumb like wat ever

  • Taking away freedom of expression and adding a rule to punish someone for a victimless crime.

    Advocating for a school dress code utilizes the same defective logic that our Government uses to support the war on drugs, just to a much lesser extent. There is no legitimate reason to tell students what to wear, is wearing a shirt with a beer logo seriously going to affect a child's ability to learn about The Revolutionary War? Absolutely not. Claiming clothes are a distraction is just something teachers like to blame so that the lack of understanding of material that is manifested among their students isn't attributed to their poor teaching skills and outdated methods. If you take a situation in which nobody is negatively affected (people wearing whatever they want within ethical reason) and you put ridiculous restrictions on them you are creating criminals/"bad kids" out of people that mean no harm in what they do. And if your only argument is bullying-related, don't even bother, the fact that something can be used as ammo for a bully does not by any means mean we should outlaw it. Should we eliminate use of the Internet for all students because some kids are getting malicious Facebook messages? Absolutely not. Bullying is caused by the bully and is a product of how he/she was raised, not because of the clothes the victim has on, the clothes only exist as ammo that the bully can use to lower their victim's self-confidence, which also raises theirs by confusing them into thinking because he points out a person's "negatives" it somehow takes away from the negative things the bully does him/herself.

  • Yes, they can be.

    In middle school, we had to wear uniforms and most of the problems at school were because of uniforms. Everyday teachers had to check if your uniform was correct. White, navy, or burgundy shirt tucked in with khaki or navy blue pants. No boots, no jackets with a hood (which are hard to find), only blue or burgundy sweater etc.. It was just so much and so time consuming. Uniforms just ignore the problem of bullying. Teach kids not to make fun of someone for what they wear instead of trying to tell kids what to wear in order to avoid confronting the problem. Normal clothes are not distracting. Tell students to respect others and focus on school work instead of each other. Everyone in the "real world" does not wear a uniform all the time.

  • Having gone to school in the UK I had a uniform.

    I noticed the school had very disproportionate punishments for the smallest infraction the uniform even said what colour socks had to be worn (grey or black. One guy I saw had very very dark navy blue socks one day any darker they would have been black. A teacher saw this when he was getting changed after games and bang 1 hour after school Friday detention just like that.

    Surely there are more pressing matters than a guy with the wrong colour socks.

  • Students should be wearing uniforms.

    I go to a school that has uniforms and no one judges you for what you wear. Bullying is a problem everywhere and one problem is the way people dress! No one can judge you for what you're because they will be wearing the something. It also make them look professional and they have a a higher chance to focus in school. School want their students to go to collage and uniforms will help them reach that goal!

  • I believe a dress code is necessary part of school rules.

    There are many different kinds of closing that would be distracting if allowed in schools, such as closing that is to short or revealing, or that might have inappropriate pictures or messages. School dress codes help to minimize these distractions and allow students to focus on more effectively on the class.

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