Amazon.com Widgets

Are standardized test scores a decent tool for secondary education institutions to consider?

  • Yes, tests give schools a way to compare their students' academic achievements

    Feedback helps almost anyone do his or her job better. Standardized test scores
    can give schools and teachers an idea of how well their children are learning,
    compared to other schools. Of course test scores are not a perfect guide, because
    not all schools face the same educational challenges. Nevertheless, test scores can
    give everyone a good idea of where they stand, and how far they have to go.

  • Standardized tests work, but aren't perfect.

    There are a lot of debates on standardized testing and the efficacy of them. I believe that standardized tests can be an OK way to test students before they move on to secondary education. There will be certain students that it doesn't work well for, but you can't game plan for the minority.

  • Standardized test scores are not a decent tool for secondary education institutions to consider.

    Standardized test scores are not a decent tool for secondary education institutions to consider. We seem to force our high school students to take this test and not really expect great scores from it. It seems to be forced upon students so the states can get funding for the school. This does not seem to benefit the children that take the test at all.

  • No, standardized test scores are not a decent tool.

    Standardized test scores should not be used as a tool for secondary education institutions to consider. The test scores will only show how well a student was able to take a test, and not the knowledge or ability that the student really has. Students also have a variety of other factors that skew the test scores.

  • No, they are not enough.

    Standardized tests can only tell the basics about how much information a student has ingested. They can not tell how smart someone is or how much capacity to learn he or she has. They are intrinsically biased in terms of how the questions are asked and the answers are expected.


Leave a comment...
(Maximum 900 words)
No comments yet.