Amazon.com Widgets
  • Noot Noot Noot

    #gyms must fall, we dont need any more sweaty fifa goals, or I will tell the germans that snoopy ate all of the peaanut butter way over the yonder, man Im supposed to be doing a research task, but Im getting hella distracted typing out my opinion on this task that I am forced to do

  • YEah nah yeah

    Yeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeahYeah nah yeah dog bah

  • I will kill you!!!

    A a a a a a a aa a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a aa a a

  • Monkey is pretty snazzy

    Snooper woopy will come to your house and probably lick up all your jam and jelly off your garbage truck dump that's sitting at the back of the house doing absolutely nothing, he's also going to come into your house and lick it all up off your greasy blue floor ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

  • Th o evl gese

    TH DUKS AR COmng TOUW KIEL YU



    . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . .. .. . . .. . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . . .. . . .. . . .. . .. .. .. .

  • Th o evl gese

    TH DUKS AR COmng TOUW KIEL YU



    . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . .. .. . . .. . . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . . .. . . .. . . .. . .. .. .. .

  • Sweat shops are bad!!!

    They may give people living in poverty money to get through the day but on the other hand they worsen their health physically and mentally and keep the poor poorer whilst the rich get richer. There are other things we should be doing to end poverty! Not supporting cruelty and supporting poverty.

  • Bad working environments

    Because women make up 85 to 90% of sweatshop workers, some employers force them to take birth control and routine pregnancy tests to avoid supporting maternity leave or providing appropriate health benefits. Also, In developing countries, an estimated 168 million children, ages 5 to 14 are forced to work to provide money for their families

  • They are bad

    They are the worst places to work we should make a different place that gives them fare pay and drink food and bathroom breaks. If they get sick they wont be able to get help because they don't have enough money. They are so bad. Boom schooled. Bosss Lol Boom

  • Sweatshops are super wrong

    Sweatshops are super super horrible they make little girls cry it is such a horrible mean act to force pepole to make things like nike and i feel horrible becaause i am wearing nike i am Billy Goodrich and I aprove this message turns out i need 7 more words piece out

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • No its good

    Without sweatshops 90% of anything your wearing would not be there
    we need clothes right? The best part is they hire hundreds or thousands of people without them about 1.55% of the world would lose their jobs. Last nobody wants to streak their entire life its just really disgusting people

  • Sweatshops aren't wrong!

    Hi. I think that sweatshops aren't all bad because they are actually proven to offer 4-5 times more the payment than many other jobs. Many people are in poverty, living in rural areas, but they get their income from working in sweatshops; many of those have limited oppertunities in their lives but sweatshops are ones who offer them one! It might not be the best, but they are doing something rather than nothing... Sweatshops are shops that invites people in poverty and offers them a key to survival. Though it might not be the best, or very much, but sweatshops has given more oppertinities to ones who really needs it...

  • Sweatshops aren't wrong!

    Hi. I think that sweatshops aren't all bad because they are actually proven to offer 4-5 times more the payment than many other jobs. Many people are in poverty, living in rural areas, but they get their income from working in sweatshops; many of those have limited oppertunities in their lives but sweatshops are ones who offer them one! It might not be the best, but they are doing something rather than nothing... Sweatshops are shops that invites people in poverty and offers them a key to survival. Though it might not be the best, or very much, but sweatshops has given more oppertinities to ones who really needs it...

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)


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