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  • Bad working environments

    Because women make up 85 to 90% of sweatshop workers, some employers force them to take birth control and routine pregnancy tests to avoid supporting maternity leave or providing appropriate health benefits. Also, In developing countries, an estimated 168 million children, ages 5 to 14 are forced to work to provide money for their families

  • They are bad

    They are the worst places to work we should make a different place that gives them fare pay and drink food and bathroom breaks. If they get sick they wont be able to get help because they don't have enough money. They are so bad. Boom schooled. Bosss Lol Boom

  • Sweatshops are super wrong

    Sweatshops are super super horrible they make little girls cry it is such a horrible mean act to force pepole to make things like nike and i feel horrible becaause i am wearing nike i am Billy Goodrich and I aprove this message turns out i need 7 more words piece out

  • Sweatshops are super wrong

    Sweatshops are super super horrible they make little girls cry it is such a horrible mean act to force pepole to make things like nike and i feel horrible becaause i am wearing nike i am Billy Goodrich and I aprove this message turns out i need 7 more words piece out

  • YES yes yes

    Yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresvvvvvyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresvyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yresyes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yres

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • Eets is not

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  • They violate human rights

    Most of the people would agree that sweatshops are not a good thing. Even Though they may have some advantages overall they are a disadvantage to humans.In sweatshops factories are not ventilated, employees are abused, there are no toilets, there are no emergency exits, doors/exits are locked, there is do not have running water, companies violate minimum wage laws, child labor is involved. In the Reconciling the Good and Evil of Sweatshops article “Honduran workers earned about $3 per day while nearly half of Hondurans earn less than $2 per day”. Sweatshops are a disadvantage to human rights, they do not care for the people who work in them. Life in a sweatshops is unpleasant and unsafe. Also it involves sexual abuses of women.
    Sweatshops are totally wrong!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Sweat shops are wrong

    Their working conditions are horrible. The majority of garment workers in Bangladesh earn little more than the minimum wage, set at 3,000 taka a month (approximately £25), far below what is considered a living wage. As well as earning a pittance, Bangladeshi factory workers face appalling conditions. Many are forced to work 14-16 hours a day seven days a week, with some workers finishing at 3am only to start again the same morning at 7.30am. On top of this, workers face unsafe, cramped and hazardous conditions which often lead to work injuries and factory fires.

  • Sweat shop are bad!

    Sweatshop are bad ,they are evil and its just like slavery in a way. Would you want to work in their conditions? Many employers were killed in the Bangladesh accident. They were supporting their families and now they died. People should now the behinds of famous companies like Nike,Apple,Samsung,and many others
    ! Sweatshops is like Hell for these poor people.

  • Sweatshops suck a bigone

    Sweatshops are bad because they are making children that could be in school and getting an education, be in work places being abused with low wages and terrible work environments. Also most of the time sweatshops are illegal and are just cheating people for what they really deserve to get.

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • No its good

    Without sweatshops 90% of anything your wearing would not be there
    we need clothes right? The best part is they hire hundreds or thousands of people without them about 1.55% of the world would lose their jobs. Last nobody wants to streak their entire life its just really disgusting people

  • Sweatshops aren't wrong!

    Hi. I think that sweatshops aren't all bad because they are actually proven to offer 4-5 times more the payment than many other jobs. Many people are in poverty, living in rural areas, but they get their income from working in sweatshops; many of those have limited oppertunities in their lives but sweatshops are ones who offer them one! It might not be the best, but they are doing something rather than nothing... Sweatshops are shops that invites people in poverty and offers them a key to survival. Though it might not be the best, or very much, but sweatshops has given more oppertinities to ones who really needs it...

  • Sweatshops aren't wrong!

    Hi. I think that sweatshops aren't all bad because they are actually proven to offer 4-5 times more the payment than many other jobs. Many people are in poverty, living in rural areas, but they get their income from working in sweatshops; many of those have limited oppertunities in their lives but sweatshops are ones who offer them one! It might not be the best, but they are doing something rather than nothing... Sweatshops are shops that invites people in poverty and offers them a key to survival. Though it might not be the best, or very much, but sweatshops has given more oppertinities to ones who really needs it...

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)

  • Three More Words

    Hello?Sweatshops are awful places to work. But they are often less awful than other jobs sweatshop workers could take. And this is the basic argument in defence of sweatshops. When people argue against them, the question we should ask is: “Compared to what?”.

    Most evidence suggests that sweatshops pay better than the alternatives. It’s hard to collect reliable data in many poor countries, but Ben Powell and David Skarbek’s 2006 paper “Sweatshops and Third World Living Standards” uses wage data given by anti-sweatshop campaigners­ to estimate wages for sweatshop workers in ten countries compared to average National Income. This, if anything, should underestimate sweatshop workers’ earnings.

    Again, it’s difficult to know how many hours the average sweatshop worker does every week, but most anti-sweatshop campaigners suggest that it is more than 70 hours per week. The results should be taken with a pinch of salt, but Powell and Skarbek found that sweatshop wages exceed average income in between eight and ten out of ten countries surveyed, depending on how many hours were worked.

    In nine out of ten countries, “working ten-hour days in the apparel industry lifts employees above (and often far above) the $2 per day threshold.” And “in half of the countries it results in earning more than three times the national average”! (Powell’s defence of sweatshops, here, is excellent. His book on the topic is self-recommending.)


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