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  • 'best' is somewhat misleading

    I think the term 'best' in this question is very misleading. What is best depends on who a person is, their nature and mentality etc. I think for children there is a strong argument that non-competitive sports are best as children will only feel rewarded for winning, and may even hate or disdain 'losing'. As Alfie Kohn points out this winner takes all mentality geared through children playing sport has far reaching consequences that we may not be aware of. Children should learn teamwork, learn to have fun and see the value in physical pursuits beyond competition. I will raise my children to play a mixture of competitive sports and non-competitive pursuits. I believe trying to limit the scope of a child's competitiveness to sport would be borderline impossible. I personally don't mind if my child doesn't excel at sports and perhaps that is the reason I would do so. For you out there who love competitive sports (which I do also - NBA fanatic) perhaps question what the impact of those competitive sports are on your children - do you think they are aware of that distinction we are making; that some competitiveness is OK in sports arenas or generally in life but that the traits accompany competitiveness may lead to feeling like a failure or other significant issues? A fish does not reflect on the nature of the water he is in. He does not notice is presence and thus cannot question its absence - please make sure you understand competitiveness is a trait, one that turns people possible into narcissistic ego-driven people and that it needs to be questioned.

  • Non competitive sports

    Depending on whether you your self want to classify that a sport is competitive or not is up to the individual person them self's, I know people who run recreational for the fun of it and for their personal health well-being. Skate boarding- is a sport but the difference is if your competing in competitions or just at the local skate park. Competitive and non competitive sports can be on different levels, the really competitive sports such as playing or competing at the competitive level as the Olympics or common wealth games is the highest level of competitive sports. Were as others might consider just skate boarding at the skate park is just for fun and not for the competitively side of it! Ten pin Bowling can be a sport that is both competitive and non competitive, its up to your self whether you want to be competitive or not!

  • People Always "Keep Score"

    It didn't matter that there is no scoreboard or official score keeper at an even, spectators and coaches were "keeping score" in their heads. The competition is what makes the sport exciting -- seeing who can better who. This is what makes the events exciting, and helps get the spectators involved more.

  • Sports are competative

    Sporting events are inherently competitive. The best sports have to have a winner and a loser, or a bunch of winners. As humans we are generally competitive and try to out due our peers in several different tasks. If there was no winning, what is the point in playing anyway?

  • NO way jose!!

    NO way! Competitiveness gives a sport a good name. It gets people interested, it lights up the brians of people. The more competitive the more exciting the game will be. Who wants to see a lowsy un competitive game. THink about it.... the three most popular sports in america...football, basketball, and baseball. They are all competitive. And what about their most popular relative...soccer!! DO you know how competitive that is! It is the worlds most popular sport and favorite sport. So now tell me, does competitiveness make sports better! ADRENALINE, ACTION, COMPETITION, MOTIVATIONAL!! THATS WHAT SPORTS WE WANT TO SEE!!

  • Friendly competition is good for everyone.

    I think competitive sports are the best. They instill a sense of teamwork and being competitive is not a bad thing. It makes people strive to work harder to improve and be better when things are competitive and that is a good attitude to have in life. Non-competitive sports make things too easy and do not make people want to try as hard if there is no sense of winning.

  • I disagree that the best sports are non-competitive.

    My boys were VERY motivated by competitive sports, but they also were athletically inclined. It was never an issue for them to stay fit, but my daughter, who struggled with her weight, found competitive sports impossible. She couldn’t compete, so why try? Finding that activity that she could do successfully could have made all the difference-yoga would have been perfect. Unfortunately, at the time, it didn’t seem a realistic option.

    I firmly believe one of the most important things a parent can do for their child is to find some activity or skill that they can master and do WELL. Some kids make that easier than others, but it’s the ones that are the most difficult that need it the most. Yoga could be a good option.

  • No, competition is the root of sports

    Sport was born out of the spirit of competition and the most popular sports in the world (NFL, NBA, soccer) are some of the most competitive sports that exist. The Olympic Games were founded upon the idea that each nation would send its very best athletes to compete against the best of the rest of the world to pu the highest level of competition on display.

  • Many of the bests sports are the best because they are competitive

    I disagree that the best sports are non-competitive. Competition often takes the sports to a whole new level. More passion and better playing may come from the competitive edge that comes with going against others in a game or sport that people already enjoy. The best players are often the best because they are driven through the competition. Even if a sport was non-competitive, someone would still be designated as better or best at it, which in that way still makes it competition. Competition is inescapable which is why I believe the best sports are not those that are non-competitive.


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