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Are the words "hell" and "damn" actually swearwords?

Asked by: ILoveCars
  • In a way it is

    Swearing is the use of offensive terms, mainly for expressing anger. A swear generally isn't used in the correct grammatical sense, as saying f*** or B**** aren't referring to their actual actions, having intercourse and a female dog respectively, when actually used in their correct way the word isn't actually a swear. Which is why people aren't offended when you talk about hell and a damn as a noun. Hell and damn are swear words when used ass such because for hundreds of years going to hell or damnation were considered the worse outcomes for someone. They are seen as negative terms just as f*** is lewd or how b*** is offensive, the only difference is that hell and damn are based on religion. Vestigial for many, yes, but for many others it's still a swear.

  • 'Damn' and 'Hell' are words to express anger and frustration

    We usually say 'damn' or 'hell' when we are expressing our anger and frustration. So it is just an expression.
    The meaning of Damn is "condemn, especially by the public expression of disapproval." Hell is "used to express annoyance or surprise or for emphasis." So in my opinion these words are not swear word.

    But if you tell me that words such as f***, a**hole, bitch are expressions, that isn't normal. These words can emotionally hurt someone so I totally disagree that these words are just expressions.

  • 'Hell' and 'damn' aren't profane to use on TV.

    In fact, "hell" has many definitions: the place being one. There is a car called the Dodge Charger and Challenger Hellcat. There is also a type of mayonnaise called "Hellmann's." It is also used as a prefix, as in "hello," "hellboy," "hellfire," and the TV series "Hell's Kitchen." None of these are swear words. Even "damn" is only a swear word if you include "god" next to it.

    If you consider hell or damn bad words, that's up to you, but if I were to think that way, I would never be uttering "asshole," "bastard," "bitch," "shit," or the f word (which I can't type here) in public. They could be used as insults, though (think "Jesus in hell" and "Goddamn").

  • They are used every day!

    They are used to express one's feelings. They aren't swear words but they aren't used in school, but we have the rights to say them anywhere else. In my opinion, hell and damn express feelings, like anger, betrayal, pain, and more. Use hell and damn instead of real swear words!


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Diqiucun_Cunmin says2015-08-12T00:51:30.980
I wouldn't use it in front of religious people. Otherwise they're fine. Code-switching FTW.
ILoveCars says2015-08-12T01:59:21.907
Well, in fact, "hell" has many definitions: the place being one. There is a car called the Dodge Charger and Challenger Hellcat. There is also a type of mayonnaise called "Hellmann's." It is also used as a prefix, as in "hello," "hellboy," "hellfire," and the TV series "Hell's Kitchen." @D_C
ILoveCars says2015-08-12T02:01:56.003
Did you know: if you remove the "ie" from the name "Damien," it becomes "Damn."
Diqiucun_Cunmin says2015-08-12T02:09:36.037
@ILoveCars: Firstly, I don't think anyone is denying that 'hell' has multiple definitions. 'D!Ck' is also a nickname of Richard, but you wouldn't use the other meaning of the word in front of your grandmother. Secondly, Hellmann is a German name. According to WordReference, 'hell' means 'shining' in German. Thirdly, 'hell' is not a prefix in any of your examples. Affixes must be bound morphemes. 'Hell' is a full word in 'Hell's Kitchen'. 'Hellboy' and 'hellfire' are formed by compounding, not affixation. 'Hell' isn't even a constituent morpheme of 'hello' - 'hello' comes from Italian 'holla'.