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AT&T Spying on Americans: Should AT&T be allowed to disclose a customer's private data without court action when requested by local or federal enforcement, while investigating a potential crime?

AT&T Spying on Americans: Should AT&T be allowed to disclose a customer's private data without court action when requested by local or federal enforcement, while investigating a potential crime?
  • Yes, they should.

    The Government agency agrees not to use the data as evidence in any judicial or administrative proceedings unless there is no other available and admissible probative evidence. But those charged with a crime are entitled to know the evidence against them come trial. Adam Schwartz, staff attorney for activist group Electronic Frontier Foundation, said that means AT&T may leave investigators no choice but to construct a false investigative narrative to hide how they use Hemisphere if they plan to prosecute anyone.

  • Yes, AT&T should be allowed to disclose a customer's private data without court action when requested by local or federal enforcement, while investigating a potential crime.

    Yes, AT&T should be allowed to disclose a customer's private data without court action when requested by local or federal enforcement, while investigating a potential crime. However, they should not have been able to spy on people in the first place. They should face severe punishments and maybe lose a lot of money for their crime.

  • No, AT&T should not be allowed to release private data without court action.

    AT&T should not be allowed to release private date without court action. Privacy is an important think in many people's lives. Most people enjoy privacy and act differently in private. AT&T should not release records if there is not a warrant. Phone and internet records are important in many cases, but they should not be given over to just anyone that asks for them.

  • No, they should not.

    This is a sticky question. Becasue first of all, AT&T should not be allowed to spy on their customers. They are collecting way too much data, not all of which is disclosed to their customers. On the other hand, it is standard practice to use phone records in court, which do require a warrent.


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