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Ban on Muslim burqa and niqab: Are the burqa/niqab a security risk?

  • Covering your face in public is extremism

    Whether it's the primary intention or not, covering the face conceals your identity, is not socially acceptable in the civilised world and is a sign of extremism (imposed or otherwise). I consider Nuns to also be extremist but I rarely enounter them and can't recall the last time one blew themselves up in a public place. If you choose (yes, it IS a choice) to cover your face in a society that values openness, then you deserve suspicion and you should be treated as a security risk.

  • It would only be fair

    If a woman visits the Islam and doesn't wear something that covers her hair or partially her body, she will most likely be stared at and in the worst case molested. She would be treated like nothing because she's not adhering to the rules. But we let them do practically anything here? No, we have our reasons and the right to ban the burqa not only it is dissocialising and radical, but also because it concerns safety.

  • It would only be fair

    If a woman visits the Islam and doesn't wear something that covers her hair or partially her body, she will most likely be stared at and in the worst case molested. She would be treated like nothing because she's not adhering to the rules. But we let them do practically anything here? No, we have our reasons and the right to ban the burqa not only it is dissocialising and radical, but also because it concerns safety.

  • Security comes first

    Security concerns are important, but the real argument against niqabs and burqas is that they are a male imposition on women without any religious or genuine modesty requirements. The word hijab (or its cognate verb hajaba) occurs only 8 times in the Qur'an, never a head covering, but as a wall or barrier. There is not a single religious argument for a custom that degrades and oppresses millions of women, sets Muslim women apart in Western streets, and gives criminals an opportunity to disguise themselves.

  • We need to ban it

    High security risk, they can chose what they do in their own country, but we have to respect them in their's.If they don't like it, they should move back. Hate it when some stupid white Brit with the mentality of a 2 year old support's them wearing them. The public should be allowed to rip them off their heads.

  • Yes because it is NOT a religious duty and because it is a security RISK

    The quran mentions the word Khumur which means headcover and not facecover. 24:30 Furthermore, during pilgrimage Muslim women must have their face and their hands uncovered . If this is done in the holiest places from an Islamic perspective, then it can be done in the West. Niqab is inherited from pre arabian cultures. Mentioning the term arabian does not equal islam . In fact, Islam came to abolish many of the barbaric traditions of arabian patriarchal societies which still exist today with using the label of Islam to protect unjust power - from the Muslima girl who wears a scarf (headcover) and asks for a niqab ban in the West for security and social integration purposes which are indeed the pillars of what Islam calls for.

  • Safety for ALL comes first!

    A child must remove their baseball cap but a niqab can be worn through security. A baby's blanket is taken away to be scanned but a niqab can be worn. How does wearing a niqab supersede safety for ALL people? As the safety of others may be compromised, the practice of covering one's face simply cannot be permitted.

  • You can not identify the person wearing the burqa.

    You can't identify a person from solely their eyes.
    If their ID is stolen and they aren't aware of it right away (they are also allowed to wear it for a drivers license), and someone uses their ID to buy a plane ticket, they could high jack a plane. The majority of our citizens safety should come first before an individuals.

  • No one should have the right to conseal their identity.

    I believe Muslims do this to intentionally prevoke criticism so they can pull the victim card! They know its threatening to the vast majority around them and that makes them feel powerful in their sad little world. They also use the anonymity of the vail to say what that like to non muslims. SAD

  • I don't trust people that choose to conceil their identity.

    First I'd like to say, personally I think women in a burqa look hideous. Human expression is a trademark of our humanity. It is insulting and extremely arrogant to think that because you are female that men would want to rape you or something because they see your face? The possibility that you might be concealing dangers weapons or bombs under your garment is a real possibility because of numerous past demonstration of your culture. If you want to wear a head scarf because your god doesn't like to see the top of a women's head is fine, but your shroud of Darth Vader is offensive to the culture you live in unless you live in Pakistan or other Muslim dominated countries. Then you can do whatever you like.

  • A problem in theory rather than reality.

    Although the Niqab might be a potential security risk, there are very few cases of it actually being used as a disguise.
    Also, the fact that Muslim women are only required to wear the Niqab in front of men (except for close relatives) means that there is a simple way out. Ask for them to remove their veil, temporarily, with a few female security guards (armed, if they feel nervous about this). Problem solved.

  • It's much harder to commit a crime if you are completely conspicuous.

    Anybody wearing a burqa or niqab is immediately stared at. It's not exactly low-profile. If you want to commit a crime, you don't want anybody looking at you. It's much easier to create harm if you blend in with everybody else - like wearing a backpack or a winter suit. Where there's a will, there is a way. The burqa ban is not about security, though it is often disguised as such.

  • Interpretation of Modesty

    The wearing of a burqa is one's interpretation of modesty. Who are we to say what they were is too little or too modest? If it is such a security issue at airports, then have women privately search the burqa wearers. I feel that it is a direct violation of someone's religous beliefs.

  • Burqa does not equal terrorist

    Renae Barker, a lecturer in law at the University of Western Australia, says that the direct security threat posed by the burqa or niqab is very low as only 2.2% of Australia’s population is Muslim and a fraction of that number wear veils. Ms Barker goes on to comment in a disclosure statement that, “Only one instance of the burqa being used as a disguise in the commission of a crime has been recorded in Australia.”
    Many people have declared that if the criminal or terrorist is completely dedicated to the cause, it will not make any difference if the burqa is banned or not.
    Ms Barker also comments that a ‘blanket ban’ is not the solution. In New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory and Western Australia, police have been granted the power to ask a person to remove their face covering, i.e. burqa or niqab, for identification purposes.
    The Islamic Information and Services Network of Australasia (IISNA) have published on their website that burqa’s are no more of a security risk than a motorcycle helmet and can be removed when requested for identification purposes. If possible, they say, it should be removed in the presence of women only.

  • You don't need a veil to wear a mask.

    The allowing of the burqa remains an issue of personal freedom rather than an issue of security. There are other methods to go about resolving issues. Many people confuse this as an issue of feminism and as a symbol of a woman's oppression, and to that I say another debate is in order. However the wearing of the Burqa throughout the world is so dismal that making it a debate creates schisms within the community pushing people towards acts of aggression as a method of demonstration.


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