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Bombing Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Did the bombings discourage countries from using atomic weapons in future?

  • Yes it did.

    The bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki did discourage countries from using atomic weapons in the future. Those bombings showed the destruction that is cause by using them. It kills a ton of people in a flash of a second, and also makes the area that was bombed uninhabitable because of the radiation.

  • Yes, it made us credible.

    Yes, the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki discouraged countries from using atomic weapons in the future, because now every other nation on earth knows that the United States will use nuclear weapons if we need to. Using the bombs also showed the world the incredible destruction that the weapons can cause. It sent a powerful message.

  • Yes, they did

    When the destruction of atomic weapons was no longer just theorized and was demonstrated in reality, it removed whatever little doubt there may have been about how devastating the weapon technology is. There's essentially no way to use it without massive civilian casualties, those bombings were a "first time and last time" event.

  • Yes, I believe the bombings discouraged countries from using atomic weapons in the future.

    Yes, I believe the bombings discouraged countries from using atomic weapons in the future. I think seeing destruction on that scale was a deterrent for other countries using atomic weapons. They knew the door they'd be opening by doing this and risking the chance of bringing such destruction onto their own country.

  • Yes, but at a cost of nuclear proliferation.

    I think that the bombings to end World War 2 in the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki did indeed discourage countries from using atomic weapons in the future. We were able to see the horrors inflicted by them. But it did not stop countries from wanting to get atomic weapons to defend themselves. So it sort of created a proliferation problem.

  • Japan bombings set precident

    The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were extremely horrible and devastating. Once people got a look at the sheer magnitude of the horror, death, and destruction it was very easy to weight the cost benefit. Many world leaders understood exactly what a weapon like that could mean and it has surely discouraged them from being cavalier about using them.

  • Unfortunately I don’t think that.

    Of course, the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were extremely horrible and devastating.
    I also think we mustn’t forget that the bombing destroyed many lives.
    But, in fact many countries still have wars.
    So maybe they will use atomic bombs for the same reason.
    Besides more than 10 countries already have atomic weapons.
    For these reasons, I tihnk that we can’t say the bombings discouraged countries from using atomic weapons.

  • Nononononononononono no no

    Using the atomic bomb set a precedent for war conduct. Although it showed the world exactly how powerful atomic weapons were, that only made it easier for countries to make threats against less courageous ones. It meant that everyone wanted the power having atomic weapons gave you over other countries.

  • No-- the Cold War did

    The reason why no countries used atomic weapons in post World War II had less to do with the Nagasaki and Hiroshima bombings than The Cold War. The Cold War was a type of tension between the US and USSR lasting from 1945-1989 that resulted in both countries stockpiling a large arsenal of nuclear weapons, with the warning that if the other so much as launched one atomic bomb, the other would launch a full-scale nuclear war. This war, called WW3, guaranteed the end of the world, since both the US and the USSR had enough weapons to destroy the world several times over. Countries the world over never dared using an atomic weapon, because no one wanted to risk the chance of starting WW3 between the two nations. So this is what discouraged the usage of atomic weapons-- the fear of sparking full scale nuclear war.


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