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California passes referendum barring legislature from passing any bill before it is published on the internet for at least 72 hours: Should all states require internet publication before passing a bill?

California passes referendum barring legislature from passing any bill before it is published on the internet for at least 72 hours: Should all states require internet publication before passing a bill?
  • Yes, that is true.

    All states require internet publication before passing a bill. This is true because some bills go unknown by most of the people. But the internet is a place that lots of people will be able to get notified and know of anything before they get a mistake. Therefore, California is right with their referendum.

  • All states should require internet publication before passing a bill

    All states should require internet publication before passing a bill. In fact, it should be expanded beyond the internet; and it should also apply to the federal government. We all recall the absurdity of Nancy Pelosi saying that Obamacare had to first pass so they could see what was in it. How is that kind of convoluted thinking even possible? How is this woman allowed to hold office?

  • Yes, I think so.

    Bills passed by the legislature usually require the approval of the executive such as the monarch, president, or governor to become law. Where a piece of primary legislation is termed an act, the process of a bill becoming law may be termed enactment. Once a bill is passed by the legislature, it may automatically become law, or it may need need further approval, in which case enactment may be effected by the approver's signature or proclamation.

  • Maybe it's a good idea

    Bills need to be presented and the public should have the opportunity to see what's being legislated before it's passed. People don't really know what goes into legislation, so when bills don't pass Congress they may not be aware of onerous riders (Zika for example). More transparency for the most part is probably a good thing.

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