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  • Yes... With an interesting philosophy

    I was diagnosed with ADHD as a child and at first I felt bad due to my parents going back and forth on whether or not to put me on medication. However, throughout time I've grown into an interesting situation. I have found that through strict practice you can hone this "hyper focus" ability that was mentioned earlier by another user. It's not the easiest battle when you have the negative stigma previously beaten into your subconsciousness, but it will only be uphill temporarily. By calling upon this "hyper focus" I've actually gotten it to come out, which made me realize ADHD's most positive use. This use is being able to exceed greatly with multiple passions. The next step is spaced repetition in the sense that you go the next level slightly slower every time. Which brings about the metaphor that ADHD is an extra muscle you can either choose to shrivel with drugs, or strengthen over time. This isn't a proven technique, but it has worked for me and I highly recommend more people try it.

  • Inattentiveness doesn't equal lazy

    Although ADHD may seem like a disability during childhood, there are many benefits of it. People with this 'disorder' tend to be creative; challenge the norms; and being very interesting. As a person who has some friends with ADHD, I can also see that they are also risk takers and surprisingly intelligent. Saying ADHD has no benefits is like saying people with Asperger's Syndrome are fully disabled. Only disadvantage is that they lack the general attention span of normal people. But everyone is different.

  • I have ADHD

    Adhd has allowed me to discover many truths that other people simply cannot see before other people say that it is.
    I also believe that my creativity and examining comes from ADHD
    I think that the problem comes from the inflexible school system because imagination is actually more important than knowledge I.E what you cannot see with the eye is more important than what you can see.

  • There are many benefits to having ADHD.

    It can be hard when you are a child but as you grow up ADHD can be a wonderful tool when you learn to work with it. There are so many advantages to having ADHD such as having lots of energy, needing less sleep than others, and being spontaneous and adventurous. A short attention span also means never having to hold a grudge.

  • YES

    I have this, and it can be very beneficial in some areas.

    One of the main areas where it can be beneficial is when I am really into something and hyper focus. This focus helps me do really good work.

    It also can be beneficial to have this when you're brainstorming for ideas. I think very quickly, so I can come up with a lot of ideas quickly.

    It can help when you're dealing with a situation where you need a lot of energy. I'm naturally hyper, so I tend to last longer than normal people when it comes to situations where a lot of energy is spent.

    It can help you when it comes to creativity, too. People like me tend to think differently than most people, and this makes us valuable when it comes to things involving creativity. We can come up with things that others would never even dream.

  • Yes, or else it would have been selected out of the population

    The mere fact that ADHD is still in the human population points to some sort of benefit. Only beneficial things persist in the population long term, especially when it comes to behavior diseases. I bet that many of the greatest motivators, artists, actors, dancers, athletes and other high energy people have ADHD. It's simply a problem when we try to force them to do something they are not wired for.

  • Tough question.

    This is a very tough question because at first glance, one would say no. Tasks and life in general, require concentration and focus, and ADHD robs people of that kind of focus. But I also know a lot of people (adults) with ADHD, and they are quite capable of effectively multi-tasking and being productive with things, even if it's annoying to keep up with their wavering attention.

  • HOW could ADHD ever be Beneficial?

    ADHD is the reason millions of kids struggle in school and other areas of life that require concentration. I can't think of a single situation that would be easier to cope with or any task which would be easier to accomplish if one had ADHD. School would be exponentially easier and those who suffer from it would learn much more easily if this condition could be cured.

  • It may seem beneficial, but....

    I think that for adults, ADHD may seem beneficial, but the ways these people are viewed (especially children) in society are unfortunately not much positive. In school for example, when children are classified as ADHD (regardless of whether they really have the disorder) teachers tend to assume that these children will have low academic performances (which is not true), and thus do not have much expectations toward them. There has been research related to this, which showed that teachers were more likely to view students who were classified as ADHD more negatively, even when the “normal” child showed the same behavior. Once students become identified as ADHD, it causes them to have low self-esteem, be treated differently among peers, and graduate later than other students. More importantly though, I feel that these students will not be able to find their true talent in life, because teachers will initially think that students will not succeed. Even as adults, how are they going to cope with life after all they have gone through in school? I believe that the benefits of ADHD can only occur when one manages to successfully graduate from school and find a job. So I guess it is not the problem with ADHD, but has more to do with the systems of our society today that doesn’t accept certain kinds of behaviors, and the negative stereotypes that majority of the people have. This is a shame because there have been many famous people who thrived despite having ADHD.

  • It may seem beneficial, but...

    I think that for adults, ADHD may seem beneficial, but the ways these people are viewed (especially children) in society are unfortunately not much positive. In school for example, when children are classified as ADHD (regardless of whether they really have the disorder) teachers tend to assume that these children will have low academic performances (which is not true), and thus do not have much expectations toward them. There has been research related to this, which showed that teachers were more likely to view students who were classified as ADHD more negatively, even when the “normal” child showed the same behavior. Once students become identified as ADHD, it causes them to have low self-esteem, be treated differently among peers, and graduate later than other students. More importantly though, I feel that these students will not be able to find their true talent in life, because teachers will initially think that students will not succeed. Even as adults, how are they going to cope with life after all they have gone through in school? I believe that the benefits of ADHD can only occur when one manages to successfully graduate from school and find a job. So I guess it is not the problem with ADHD, but has more to do with the systems of our society today that doesn’t accept certain kinds of behaviors, and the negative stereotypes that majority of the people have. This is a shame because there have been many famous people who thrived despite having ADHD.


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