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  • It has to be true.

    If it wasn't, both the ideas of creationism and evolutionism would be wrong. In creationism, God appeared out of nothing. In evolutionism and atheism (as far as I know) an explosion from gasses came out of nothing that produced planets (the big bang). Even though I think the idea of evolutionism is just silly and incorrect, if things can't come from nothing, then BOTH creationism and evolutionism are wrong.

  • According to the latest in string theory

    Its common knowledge we are made up of cells that are made of atoms. If string theory is right and my understanding good, atoms are made from small bits of energy vibrating in space. These strings according to the theory can interchange between different dimensions. And according to the laws of quantum mechanics, which im a believer something can and does come out of nothing. If protons can be in every place at once and strings of energy come in and out of existence (whether just in our universe) then something can come from nothing

  • Seems To Be The Most Logical Answer

    I try not to laugh when a believer states than an atheist is making a greater leap of faith that something can come from nothing; how do they explain where their God came from? He appears to have come from nothing too. Stating that he/she is out of time is hardly a satisfactory answer, one could argue that the universe came from out of time or created it as a result of the Big Bang. Also, if you cannot comprehend that the randomness of particles managed to form beings as complex as we are over billions of years, then how do you explain how particles managed to fit themselves forming a supernatural being such as God, in mere nano-seconds?

  • I don't see why not

    The idea that something CAN'T happen if there was nothing, implies that there exists some sort of restriction preventing something. However, a restriction is something in itself. Thus, its not clear why something COULDN'T happen if there was absolutely nothing. What prevents something from happening if there is absolutely nothing?

  • Yes it can?

    An idea can come from nothing. Imagination allows that to be possible. Although I suppose it could be argued that even ideas that are radically different and 'imaginative' are based off something else, in which case it would be 'no'. However, this is probably not the answer you're looking for...

  • Ask a particle physicist

    In qm particles appear out of nothing all the time. It is described and measured as the Casimir effect. It is also the source of Hawking radiation, which causes black holes to evaporate. The theistic presumption is that the universe came into existence as a result of intention on the part of a creator, because anything that begins must have a cause. How one even gets from that assertion of causality to the claim that a particular deity was responsible is beyond me. If everything has a cause then the creator has a cause. If some things do not have a cause then the universe is as likely as an intentional deity to not have a cause. I am suspicious of assertions of complete understanding of the why questions , when scientific knowledge has a way of negating the god of the gaps arguments.

  • There is nothing like 'nothing'

    Something has always existed and will ever continue to exist. Nothing is created out of nothing, nor it can be destroyed to nothing. Things merely appear, disappear and reappear for our senses to take into cognizance. What we term as 'nothing' is simply 'something' that we are unable to perceive by our limited senses.

  • Why so certain?

    I believe that we can almost never be certain of almost anything. Obviously you're certain your name is "Jeff" or "Lorenzo" or whatever it may be. Even in that case you probably have never questioned whether or not you had your memory wiped, given a new name, new memories, and will become the next 007. You probably aren't but who knows.

    So when I catch wind that someone or a group of someone's act 100% certain that something couldn't come from nothing. 72% of the universe is dark energy, 24% of the universe is dark matter(both things we have no clue what the hell they are), and the other 4% is regular matter(stars, planets, humans,etc.). So all we "think" we know is all of 4% of the universe. There is so much we as humans are limited by because of our brains. They do some amazing stuff but our brains evolved from Africa to not get eaten by lions and how to reproduce. We didn't evolve to understand the cosmos and the quantum realm intuitively. Everything about the quantum realm is intuitive, but it works. Since its discovery in the early 1900's there has been many attempts to disprove the theory, even Einstein didn't like it. But still it's experiments come out with results with a margin of error so small that it would be it guessing the length of the USA to within a yard.

    Now I propose that maybe whatever the real answer is, and whatever that insinuates, may not make sense with our brains or its so simple that we laugh at why we never thought of it before. I personally believe that something came from nothing and I believe in the multiverse and all that jazz because it sounds logical but the universe does not care about logic.

  • If it's true, then it must happen

    It happens when we forget something and we don't know how it could happen, but nothing really happened, we just forgot about it. The moment between remembering and forgetting something. That's when nothing happens, therefore nothing exists. We might never know what it is, by the time we remember what we forgot, nothing else matters. There's nothing again. See, nothing happens all the time.

  • This is the only logical explanation

    Think about it - if something is needed to make something else, the origin of the prior something comes into question. This forms an infinite sequence. The only logical end/explanation to the existence of something is that is came from nothing - this is where the chain ends. Only this answer is satisfactory

  • Nothing isn't real

    There is no proof that nothing ever even existed, let alone that something came from it. There is a lot of talk about quantum fluctuations, but I never seen a quantum fluctuation, I don't believe in it. It is probably coming from something. First you have to prove to me that nothing exist, and then you have to create a macroscopic object come from nothing that I can see, then I will believe that something can come from nothing.

  • I don't believe something can come from nothing.

    But I readily admit (unlike many atheists) that this is, ultimately, a statement of faith. True, there certainly is no evidence that something can come from nothing, so we must either appeal to some logical argument, or we must appeal to some faith-claim or revelatory insight.

    But I have problems with several of the other posts on this opinion thread:

    1. The atheist tendency to insist that the theist argument for God (in this case, the cosmological argument) is fallacious BECAUSE "God had to come from something" is confusing. Often, the atheist is trying to AGREE with the notion that the universe came from nothing, then, when the theist asserts that God is back of it all, some atheists complain, "But God had to come from somewhere...!" So, I don't get it. Are these atheists AGREEING that you can't get something from nothing? To put in another way, if these atheists are suggesting that all reality came from nothing, then why couldn't God also come from nothing? Why is it that God has to have some beginning explanation but all reality does not? Which leads to my next point.

    2. I believe this kind of discussion often misses a crucial point, which is that we often morph these discussions into whether or not God is back of the universe. The issue of whether something can come from nothing isn't NECESSARILY only theological (though I believe it can only be resolved by faith)...But an atheist of the stature of say, Stephen Hawking, suggests that our reality may, indeed, by infinite (that is, has no beginning). So just because we claim something is infinite (whether a Mind or a Process) doesn't mean we necessarily are claiming there is God in the strict biblical sense of the word. In other words, we have basically two options as pertains the origins question: either it all came from nothing, or it came from something. We then have basically two options as pertains the God question: was there a Mindful Being behind the process (whether it came from nothing or not), or did it all happen mindlessly (whether "it all" is infinite or not). The two issues may be related in some ways, but really are quite separate issues. Insisting that something HAD to come from something (whether you believe God is part of that equation or not, and whether you believe infinity is part of the equation or not) is just as much a statement of faith as insisting that "it all" came about from nothing. Indeed, I tend to side with those who believe "it" (whatever it is) has always been here, and that this is more philosophically sound than believing it all just came about somehow, and that believing otherwise require a GREATER leap, but I won't play the BOP (burden of proof) card. I maintain this issue can only be resolved by faith (whether you include God in the equation or not).

    Posted by: thg
  • Something cannot come from nothing

    Everything has to come from somewhere. Energy cannot be created nor destroyed. It is simple logic that all energy is only transferred and converted and not created. Nothing cannot produce something because it has no energy or any form of matter that it can convert into different forms of energy because it is nothing. It's simply that.

  • Science is of the way things are. How else could they get here?

    Okay so mainstream scientist believe that the empty void that is now the Universe was once a place of nothingness. Then that nothing exploded into EVERYTHING! Yes nothing went to everything and that everything then organized itself into atoms . And that stuff that was nothing and became something then arranged carbon atoms into a living breathing organism. Is it just me or does the idea that a pile of nothing could become life miss a couple key fact. On Earth scientists notice that inorganic material NEVER becomes organic unless it is introduced to organic materials. Nothing can't become something.

  • Nothing has no causal power

    Everything that begins to exist must have a cause. True Nothing has zero causal power. You must somehow import something that is a causal agent into the equation. For example, an alternative universe is "something". Therefore, to say that an alternative universe cause something from nothing is not a valid argument. The same thing goes with quantum physics - you keep importing something into the equation.

  • Technically and specifically

    If there is literally nothing, then no. Though, if there is something, such as a field in which anything can exist, then yes. But nothing should really be nothing, though when people speak of this nothing we are speaking of, then their nothing is usually at least something, which brings to mind how there had to have been something. In response to some of the yes comments, when speaking of God, He is everlasting, meaning He has no beginning and no end.

  • Any THING defined as noTHING is misdefined and necessarily someTHING

    By definition, nothing is the absence of something. In a metaphysical sense, if someone talks about nothing being something or something coming from nothing then they have clearly misdefined what they are trying to describe. Even if by our understanding (or lack there if) of how the physical world works could possibly let us define something as norhing (eg a vacuum) it goes to show that we do not understand what exactly is there.

  • Any THING defined as noTHING is misdefined and necessarily someTHING

    By definition, nothing is the absence of something. In a metaphysical sense, if someone talks about nothing being something or something coming from nothing then they have clearly misdefined what they are trying to describe. Even if by our understanding (or lack there if) of how the physical world works could possibly let us define something as norhing (eg a vacuum) it goes to show that we do not understand what exactly is there.

  • No fucking way.

    Our minds cant picture what its like to be outside of time, space and matter which all had to be created. So inside of space, time, and matter if I destroy my room with clothes all over the floor, dishes, and bed not made up if I never decide to clean it up it will never get cleaned and will remain the same. Same is true for nothine, if nothine exist its impossible for something to come about with sone sort of action.

  • There is nothing like 'nothing'

    Something has always existed and will ever continue to exist. Nothing is created out of nothing, nor it can be destroyed to nothing. Things merely appear, disappear and reappear for our senses to take into cognizance. What we term as 'nothing' is simply 'something' that we are unable to perceive by our limited senses.


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ooberman says2013-07-26T03:25:36.840
Depends on how you define "nothing". From the scientific definition, something MUST come from nothing based on quantum theory.
From the Philosophical definition, no, but "nothing" can't be shown to ever have existed, so it's a moot point.
owenmontoux says2013-07-26T04:44:51.507
Okay let me change it to did our perceivable universe come out of "perceivable" nothingness
StormHeflin says2013-11-19T16:55:35.530
I just wanted to put this out there...I'm 15, and i believe that the 'nothing' never could completely exist. Imagine this....The guy i few comments up said that the absolute zero of the universe was positive and negative energy canceling, i think the big bang came to be because while the neutral energy was zooming everywhere, two neutrals with the signature of a positive collided and drew in ALL energy with a positive signature, and the positives all became a single point which created gravity, and since gravity was created, the crushing force of the gravity must have been so tense, that the positive energy exploded with such tremendous force that positive energy fused into atoms with a few negatives as it collided ( The Big Bang ). And the dark matter that we suspect is just the true 'nothing' of the universe, left over, unwanted negative nothing nothingness.