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  • Therapy can help Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    I feel that therapy can help Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. I believe that most if not all illnesses, diseases, syndromes can be healed through the correct therapy. The patients must first be willing, able, and dedicated to improving their conditions. Without these three traits, an individual will continue to suffer the symptoms of their syndrome.

  • Yes, by breaking the cycle of adding stress to an already bad situation.

    Having any knid of illness creates psychological and physical stress on the body. Therapy can help stop psychological stress from creating even MORE physical stress (if you nk cells are already maxed out, diminishing their ability to operate even more with any other stressor only makes things worse). Also, there's a learning curve involved even after a person has reached acceptance. Therapy can help people figure out how to compensate, where possible. E.g. accept you can nolonger stand as long as you used to, but then be prepared if you have to go somewhere by having a lightweight, portable chair so you can pace and sit vs. Push and exacerbate your symptoms. Ditto, if you have blood sugar issues: accept and always be prepared (e.G. Emergency stash of almonds). If there is a website where people have shared things like this, I sure would love the url. I've wasted money I can't afford to waste learning some things like this by trial and error.

  • Activity will help.

    Yes, therapy can help Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, because there are ways that people with fatigue can make lifestyle changes to improve their outcomes. Therapy can help a person become stronger and more fit. That usually helps with fatigue. They can also examine lifestyle, and see if changes can't be made to routine.

  • Yes, it can.

    There are several sorts of therapies that can help chronic fatigue syndrome. Since there is no one cause for it, there is often a multi pronged attack against the illness, such as an anti-depressant and an exercise regiment. Sometimes it's as simple as cleaning up your diet and removing allergens.

  • We Need Research and Medical treatment

    Most of us have poor immune systems, cardiovascular issues, and much more. We need medications to treat our viruses such as HHV6, EBV, CMV. The antivirals approved not work for me. We have retro and enteroviruses. P.O.T.S, vasculitis, low NKC. We are a complex multi-SYSTEM disease. ME is NOT CFS. If therapy can help - many of us would not be still suffering for over 30 years! It is time for it to stop and physicians and the world understand the true meaning of ME and CFS must be addressed separately from ME.

  • Myalgic Encephalomyelitis aka Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is an organic disease that can be diagnosed by blood work and Pet Scan tests.

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis incorrectly called Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in the United States is an organic disease caused by a virus. I was struck down with this disease after contracting mono which is caused by the Epstein Barr virus. So no, one can not heal an organic disease by talking. That's like asking if someone can be healed cancer or M.S. Or arthritis by talk therapy.

  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Myalgic Encephalomylitis has nothing to do with fatigue

    Many uninformed people even Drs. Confuse CFS/ME with "chronic fatigue" when it has nothing at all to do with fatigue. CFS/ME is a very complex underfunded serious disease that can cause great deal of disability. CFS/ME cannot be helped or cured with any type of psychotherapy, although as in most chronic illnesses it can in some cases help a patient cope and get support. CFS/ME is a life changing disease and in severe cases suicide is a potential reaction to the devastating impact on one's life so supportive therapy may be helpful. Exercise is dangerous in that it causes relapses and worsening in symptoms, in fact even in moderate cases exertion must be carefully budgeted to avoid overdoing.

  • Frequent fatigue or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome? Help or Cure? And where does the confusion the come from?

    Terms are vital to properly answer this question. There are psychiatrists who seem determined to muddy the waters, who study frequent fatigue but inaccurately call it Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. They cause confusion over therapy in CFS and it is time for the medical community to rebuke these doctors for their serious malpractice.

    First: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is NOT being tired all the time. CFS is a specific constellation of symptoms including cognitive problems, significant pain, muscle weakness, and fatigue. Other symptoms involve the autonomic nervous and immune systems. The number one symptom is a significant worsening of symptoms following even minor exertion (physical or mental). Frequent fatigue caused by poor diet, stress, or over-activity does not have these symptoms. Fatigue caused by depression sometimes can include pain and slowed responses, but it is nearly always characterized by a "loss of pleasure," which CFS does not have. Though scientists aren't positive yet, it appears CFS is mostly likely an immune problem (either an auto-immune reaction or an infection the body can't defeat).

    Second: Help or cure? Therapy can help anyone in any a stressful situation -- divorce, career change, dealing with chronic illness (yours or a loved one's). It helps those with cancer or AIDS or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome because it can provide insights and coping strategies, as well as provide a safe place to vent the natural frustrations and anger that go with life-changing illnesses. It will not, however, cure any of these diseases and to suggest otherwise should be called what it is: malpractice.

    The research of the psychiatrists mentioned above may include a few CFS patients, just like a study of skin moles might include a few cases of skin cancer. But just as it would be irresponsible to recommend skin cancer treatments based on skin mole studies ("do nothing, they won't hurt you"), so it is irresponsible to recommend CFS treatments based on generalized fatigue (“be more active”). While counseling and exercise may 'cure' the fatigue those who are depressed or over-burdened, there is no way either will cure immune abnormalities, decreased blood flow to the brain, or other physical problems in CFS.

    Furthermore, because the key symptom of CFS is the worsening of symptoms after exertion, the therapies suggested by these psychiatrists actually backfire in CFS patients, making many sufferers worse. Research shows that CFS patients do not recover properly from exercise, and that exertion causes an increase in immune and inflammation factors in the blood. Exercise testing show that CFS patients who push their limits have their capacity drop dramatically the next day, a pattern not found in anyone else. The most beneficial thing patients can do is stay within the limits set by their bodies. If the goal of therapy is to teach patients to ignore these limits (and this is exactly what these psychiatrists recommend), patients will ultimately end up being able to do even less. "Therapy," as prescribed by these unscrupulous doctors, most definitely does not help Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

  • Frequent fatigue or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome? Help or cure? And why the confusion?

    Terms are vital to properly answer this question. There are psychiatrists who seem determined to muddy the waters, who study frequent fatigue but inaccurately call it Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. They cause confusion over therapy in CFS and it is time for the medical community to rebuke these doctors for their serious malpractice.

    First: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is NOT being tired all the time. CFS is a specific constellation of symptoms including cognitive problems, significant pain, muscle weakness, and fatigue. Other symptoms involve the autonomic nervous and immune systems. The number one symptom is a significant worsening of symptoms following even minor exertion (physical or mental). Frequent fatigue caused by poor diet, stress, or over-activity does not have these symptoms. Fatigue caused by depression sometimes can include pain and slowed responses, but it is nearly always characterized by a "loss of pleasure," which CFS does not have. Though scientists aren't positive yet, it appears CFS is mostly likely an immune problem (either an auto-immune reaction or an infection the body can't defeat).

    Second: Help or cure? Therapy helps anyone in any a stressful situation -- divorce, career change, dealing with chronic illness (yours or a loved one's). It helps those with cancer or AIDS or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome because it can provide insights and coping strategies, as well as provide a safe place to vent the natural frustrations and anger that go with life-changing illnesses. It will not, however, cure any of these diseases and to suggest otherwise should be called what it is: malpractice.

    The research of the psychiatrists mentioned above may include a few CFS patients, just like a study of skin moles might include a few cases of skin cancer. But just as it would be irresponsible to recommend skin cancer treatments based on skin mole studies ("do nothing, they won't hurt you"), so it is irresponsible to recommend CFS treatments based on generalized fatigue (“be more active”). While counseling and exercise may 'cure' the fatigue those who are depressed or over-burdened, there is no way either will cure immune abnormalities, decreased blood flow to the brain, or other physical problems in CFS.

    Furthermore, because the key symptom of CFS is the worsening of symptoms after exertion, the therapies suggested by these psychiatrists actually backfire in CFS patients, making the vast majority of sufferers worse. Research shows that CFS patients do not recover properly from exercise, and that exertion causes an increase in immune and inflammation factors in the blood. Exercise testing show that CFS patients who push their limits have their capacity drop dramatically the next day, a pattern not found in anyone else. The most beneficial thing patients can do is stay within the limits set by their bodies. If the goal of therapy is to teach patients to ignore these limits (and this is exactly what these psychiatrists recommend), patients will ultimately end up being able to do even less. "Therapy," as prescribed by these unscrupulous doctors, most definitely does not help Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

  • Frequent fatigue or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome? Help or cure? And why the confusion?

    Terms are vital to properly answer this question. There are psychiatrists who seem determined to muddy the waters, who study frequent fatigue but inaccurately call it Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. They cause confusion over therapy in CFS and it is time for the medical community to rebuke these doctors for their serious malpractice.

    First: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is NOT being tired all the time. CFS is a specific constellation of symptoms including cognitive problems, significant pain, muscle weakness, and fatigue. Other symptoms involve the autonomic nervous and immune systems. The number one symptom is a significant worsening of symptoms following even minor exertion (physical or mental). Frequent fatigue caused by poor diet, stress, or over-activity does not have these symptoms. Fatigue caused by depression sometimes can include pain and slowed responses, but it is nearly always characterized by a "loss of pleasure," which CFS does not have. Though scientists aren't positive yet, it appears CFS is mostly likely an immune problem (either an auto-immune reaction or an infection the body can't defeat).

    Second: Help or cure? Therapy helps anyone in any a stressful situation -- divorce, career change, dealing with chronic illness (yours or a loved one's). It helps those with cancer or AIDS or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome because it can provide insights and coping strategies, as well as provide a safe place to vent the natural frustrations and anger that go with life-changing illnesses. It will not, however, cure any of these diseases and to suggest otherwise should be called what it is: malpractice.

    The research of the psychiatrists mentioned above may include a few CFS patients, just like a study of skin moles might include a few cases of skin cancer. But just as it would be irresponsible to recommend skin cancer treatments based on skin mole studies ("do nothing, they won't hurt you"), so it is irresponsible to recommend CFS treatments based on generalized fatigue (“be more active”). While counseling and exercise may 'cure' the fatigue those who are depressed or over-burdened, there is no way either will cure immune abnormalities, decreased blood flow to the brain, or other physical problems in CFS.

    Furthermore, because the key symptom of CFS is the worsening of symptoms after exertion, the therapies suggested by these psychiatrists actually backfire in CFS patients, making the vast majority of sufferers worse. Research shows that CFS patients do not recover properly from exercise, and that exertion causes an increase in immune and inflammation factors in the blood. Exercise testing show that CFS patients who push their limits have their capacity drop dramatically the next day, a pattern not found in anyone else. The most beneficial thing patients can do is stay within the limits set by their bodies. If the goal of therapy is to teach patients to ignore these limits (and this is exactly what these psychiatrists recommend), patients will ultimately end up being able to do even less. "Therapy," as prescribed by these unscrupulous doctors, most definitely does not help Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

  • M.E. Is not a psychological illness; it is a physical illness and it needs physical treatment.

    "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" is sometimes used to describe Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E.). M.E. Is not a psychological illness; it is a physical illness and it needs physical treatment. Therapy won't help someone with M.E. Any more than it will help someone with cancer. It may give the patients some techniques to cope with the disease, but it will have no effect on the disease itself.

  • Depends on how you define "help."

    Would you be asking the question, Can therapy help cancer? Can therapy help multiple sclerosis? Lupus? Someone who has heart disease? Can therapy help meningitis or hepatitis or Alzheimer's? Therapy is good for a lot of things. Therapy does not heal diseases. Chronic fatigue syndrome is a serious neuro-immune disease that requires appropriate medial care. A good therapist could potentially help someone cope with a their illness.

  • Symptom or Disease?

    Therapy can help "chronic fatigue," the -Symptom.- Learning behavioral changes changes can help people who are tired and stressed. But most people diagnosed with CFS meet the criteria for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), a disease which causes documented damage to the mitochondria (the part of cells that produce energy) and changes in B cells, NK cells, cardiovascular system, immune system, and neurological system. This is a biological disease and saying it is treatable with therapy is similar to suggesting you can treat cancer or diabetes by talking to a shrink. As a ME("CFS") patient, my exercise testing shows that my body goes anaerobic within 2 minutes of exercise, which means my brain, organs, and muscles stop receiving oxygen. No wonder I'm sick. I'm not too stressed out, I'm recovering from lack of oxygen! That testing is called 2 day CPET and I encourage other ME("CFS") patients to look into it.

  • No therapyt cannot help Chronic fatgue syndrome

    Therapyt is not a therapy that I am familiar with in reference to helping with chronic fatigue syndrome. There may need to be a lot more research done before any claims are made of its effectiveness. There are no proven testimonials from therapyt users that state is has helped with chronic fatigue.


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