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CNN's Sanjay Gupta: Americans 'terribly and systematically misled' about marijuana. Do you agree?

  • Yes, we have been.

    I read his op-ed piece. I didn't know how bad things were until I did. There is no reason that marijuana should be in the same category as heroin - people don't steal from their own families to fund a marijuana addiction. He also cited the many studies showing cases where marijuana is an effective medicine, as well as that only 10 percent of pot users are dependent, compared to 30 percent of tobacco users. This is the government telling blatant lies - marijuana is nowhere near as bad as heroin.

  • Is this not obvious enough?

    What kind of person believes in locking a person in a cage for growing a plant? What kind of a person will lock a person in a cage for doing safe experiments with plants? What kind of a person prevents scientific research of plants?

    Need I ask any more questions?

  • Yes, of course.

    Anyone with half a brain and access to the Internet should realize that we have been repeatedly lied to about the effects (or lack thereof) of marijuana. Hopefully now that such a well-known and well-respected figure has come out and apologized for misleading the American public, the general attitude towards pot in our culture will change. There are numerous documented instances of marijuana helping and sometimes even curing ailments related to conditions such as cancer, epilepsy, diabetes, and more. And, perhaps even more importantly, there are ZERO documented deaths from marijuana. So why the "systematic misleading?" Because Big Pharma can make a LOT more money from a) pushing manufactured pills, and b) keeping people sick and on medication rather than curing them. This entire thing is disgusting and corrupt and makes me ill. Hopefully Gupta's statements and his upcoming documentary about marijuana will influence others to change their minds.

  • It's not for everyone

    Cigarettes cause cancer and they make you feel like crap. But now there are so many genetically modified foods that are just as dangerous if not more dangerous than cigarettes. Weed doesn't work for me. I made me paranoid and filled me with self doubt. It made my eyes dry and I wear contact lens. But sometimes it was very relaxing after a stressful day at work. More corporate managers need to smoke weed. It might make the workplace more pleasant to go to each day. The uptight negative trouble makers might just leave us alone so we can do our jobs. All I know is weed makes people less dangerous than alcohol does. It's different for different for different people. I don't feel comfortable on cocaine either yet some people appear to function totally normal on it. I can't do coffee or fresh brewed tea because of the caffiene but some people need it to wake up. I'm good with a bowl of fruit loops in the morning and a couple of beers after work. Each of us are made up different with different chemical balances.

  • Used as recreational

    Because pot is used as a recreational resource ...Its too commonly considered just that and almost always frowned upon. That, and the fact that many people's experiences related to marijuana have involved people they know or have known sometime in the course of their lifetime who were habitual, stereotypical pot heads who were so into the stuff and used so much. This would have a very negative impact just as the lives that chronic drinkers have. There are responsibilities with everything we put in our bodies. If you use cannabis responsibly...You should not treat it as as recreational

  • Data is available

    A number of organizations (such as DPF and NORML) has presented data to both federal and state officials over many years. Government officials will not listen. Many people talked about police corruption and how the government is making money off drug laws. (See recent New Yorker article "Taken" about Texas, Oklahoma, Detroit.)

  • He is a liar and phony!

    He has changed his position only because CNN is now Pro Pot. He is now being politically correct for his station.

    Here is what he wrote on Thursday, January 8, 2009:

    "Health: Why I Would Vote No On Pot"

    By Sanjay Gupta, M.D.

    Gupta cannot prove that

    "We “We have been terribly and systematically misled for nearly 70 years in the United States, and I apologize for my own role in that ... I didn't look hard enough, until now. I didn't look far enough ... I was too dismissive of the loud chorus of legitimate patients whose symptoms improved on cannabis.”

    Show your proof Gupta!

    He now smokes pot all the time; such a two-faced liar.

    Read more: http://www.Time.Com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1552034,00.Html#ixzz2bXOrawuJ


    He has been mislead about nothing. There are hundreds of studies that detail why marijuana is a dangerous addictive drug.

    It is very sad that is has changed his position. He can no more cite studies that disprove all the other studies. He is intellectually dishonest.

    It is all about being politically correct; it is similar to Obama changing his mind on homosexuality.

    And, he apparently smoke a lot of pot; maybe his brain has been effected.

    The only thing he said that is correct is this:

    "Marijuana not for "developing brains"
    There are concerns he has "as a father" about marijuana. "Young, developing brains are likely more susceptible to harm from marijuana than adult brains," he said. "Some recent studies suggest that regular use in teenage years leads to a permanent decrease in IQ. Other research hints at a possible heightened risk of developing psychosis."

    "Much in the same way I wouldn't let my own children drink alcohol, I wouldn't permit marijuana until they are adults. If they are adamant about trying marijuana, I will urge them to wait until they're in their mid-20s when their brains are fully developed."

    So, I guess he is now being politically correct and saying if you are at least 21, then it is OK to smoke the harmful drug.

    Dr. Gupta, who has appeared on some three dozen TV shows talking about medical issues, pointed out that cigarettes have an addiction rate of close to 30 percent while heroin "hooks" about 25 percent of users and cocaine about 20 percent. He said marijuana also leads to dependence in some of its adult users but in only about "9 or 10 percent."

    Read more: http://www.Digitaljournal.Com/article/356111#ixzz2bXLgGbfg


    But, he is just a popular opinion whore and if the public decides tomorrow that Pot is bad or if his rating drop; he most likely will change his mind again.

    Maybe it had to do with the drop in rating for his TV Show, "Monday Mornings" from creators David E. Kelly and Dr. Sanjay Gupta.
    TV Ratings: TNT's 'Monday Mornings' Fizzles With 1.34 Million Premiere
    http://www.Hollywoodreporter.Com/live-feed/tv-ratings-tnts-monday-mornings-418162

    Gupta is an arrogant AH. Maybe it is his Hollywood friends that have changed his mind.

    Very Sad.

  • Marijuana smells like crap.

    It's hard to be misled about something that is so repugnant in its odious stench. I'm glad it is something kept at the fringes, and would not like to see it developed into the mainstream. It would be akin to saying that we should become closer to nature by keeping sewer lines open so that we can all bask in the smell of feces and urine.

  • Talk about irony.

    Having done extensive research on the subject independently, it is pretty much the other way around when it comes to Cannabis, isolated THC and the like. While it has little chance of creating a physical addiction for one, it will eventually develop into a psychological dependency with symptoms similar to that of a bona fide physical addiction. In addition, those under the influence of this drug essentially numb their senses, and at times shut down complete systems in the brain such as cognitive abilities, muscle memory, sense of direction, sense of time, short and long term memory(Where long term use induces long term and possibly event permanent effects) and diminished concentration. While I have no problem with recreational use in a controlled environment, I do believe that you should not be allowed to smoke(or consume) cannabis in public, in a work environment or while doing something that requires your full attention.

  • Any drug is addictive

    I disagree with Dr Gupta. I saw his video report on CNN this year, and while it did seem to have medical uses, such as lessening the epileptic episodes for this little girl, the truth is I've seen friends who have ruined their lives because of marijuana. Sure, not to the extent of the effects of heroin or other narcotics, but they lost their sense of reality, affecting their performance at work and their relationships.


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GWL-CPA says2013-08-16T01:54:27.677
All the pot heads are cheering over what Gupta said, but did they read everything he said?

Maybe you did not read everything Gupta said?

"Marijuana not for "developing brains"
There are concerns he has "as a father" about marijuana. "Young, developing brains are likely more susceptible to harm from marijuana than adult brains," he said. "Some recent studies suggest that regular use in teenage years leads to a permanent decrease in IQ. Other research hints at a possible heightened risk of developing psychosis."

"Much in the same way I wouldn't let my own children drink alcohol, I wouldn't permit marijuana until they are adults. If they are adamant about trying marijuana, I will urge them to wait until they're in their mid-20s when their brains are fully developed."

So according to Gupta, you should not try smoking marijuana until you are at least 25. He agrees with those studies that say marijuana is harmful if you smoke it too young or under the age of 25.

I am OK with that. Are you?

I think Gupta would be for mandatory of testing of kids in middle and high school to make sure they are not doing marijuana.

But, the fact is that there are many current studies that prove that marijuana is a dangerous drug and has no medical benefit smoked versus taking a marijuana pill, that has been approved by the FDA and medical community.

And, most people in jail for drugs and especially for marijuana are not in jail for simple possession.

Myth: Prisons are full of people in for marijuana possession.

Http://www.Rollingstone.Com/culture/lists/top-10-marijuana-myths-and-facts-20120822/myth-prisons-are-full-of-people-in-for-marijuana-possession-19691231#ixzz2N4A64pMZ

Here is another great source for myths about marijuana.

Fiction: Drug Legalization Works
http://www.Justthinktwice.Com/factsfiction/fiction_drug_legalization_works.Html

“Who’s Really in Prison for Marijuana?”
http://www.Prisonpolicy.Org/scans/whos_in_prison_for_marij.Pdf

Have you ever read “The DEA Position on Marijuana” that references hundreds of medical studies that prove that marijuana is a dangerous drug?

Http://www.Justice.Gov/dea/docs/marijuana_position_2011.Pdf

You seemed to overlook Marijuana Myths and Facts – 10 popular misconceptions.

Https://www.Ncjrs.Gov/ondcppubs/publications/pdf/marijuana_myths_facts.Pdf

This is from the Bureau of Justice Statistics – Drugs and Crime Fasts:

Drug-related crime
In 2004, 17% of state prisoners and 18% of federal inmates said they committed their current offense to obtain money for drugs. These percentages represent a slight increase for federal prisoners (16% in 1997) and a slight decrease for state prisoners (19% in 1997).

Source: BJS, Drug Use and Dependence, State and Federal Prisoners, 2004, NCJ 213530, October 2006 and Substance Abuse and Treatment, State and

Federal Prisoners, 1997, NCJ 172871, January 1999.
In 2002 about a quarter of convicted property and drug offenders in local jails had committed their crimes to get money for drugs, compared to 5% of violent and public order offenders. Among state prisoners in 2004 the pattern was similar, with property (30%) and drug offenders (26%) more likely to commit their crimes for drug money than violent (10%) and public-order offenders (7%). In federal prisons property offenders (11%) were less than half as likely as drug offenders (25%) to report drug money as a motive in their offenses.

The Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) reported that in 2007, 3.9% of the 14,831 homicides in which circumstances were known were narcotics related. Murders that occurred specifically during a narcotics felony, such as drug trafficking or manufacturing, are considered drug related.

College student victims

Overall 41% of violent crimes committed against college students and 38% of nonstudents were committed by an offender perceived to be using drugs, 1995-2000. About 2 in 5 of all rape/sexual assaults and about a quarter of all robberies against a college student were committed by an offender perceived to be using drugs.

Source: BJS, Violent Victimization of College Students, 1995-2000, NCJ 196143, December 2003.

Prisoners

In the 2004 Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities, 32% of state prisoners and 26% of federal prisoners said they had committed their current offense while under the influence of drugs. Among state prisoners, drug offenders (44%) and property offenders (39%) reported the highest incidence of drug use at the time of the offense. Among federal prisoners, drug offenders (32%) and violent offenders (24%) were the most likely to report drug use at the time of their crimes.

Source: BJS, Drug Use and Dependence, State and Federal Prisoners, 2004, NCJ 213530, October 2006.

About 74% of state prisoners who had a mental health problem and 56% of those without were dependent on or abused alcohol or drugs. By specific type of substance, inmates who had a mental health problem had higher rates of dependence or abuse of drugs than alcohol. Among state prisoners who had a mental health problem, 62% were dependent on or abused drugs and 51% alcohol.
Http://www.Bjs.Gov/content/dcf/duc.Cfm