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Did the Fourteenth Amendment achieve its goal of equalizing the rights of black and white males following the American Civil War?

  • Yes, the 14th Amendment achieved its goal.

    I believe that the 14th Amendment achieved its goal of equalizing the rights of black and white males following the American Civil War. I think that it may have took a couple decades for it to truly get right, but it did change the way the people of the country lived.

  • Yes It Did

    I believe fourteenth amendment did achieve its goals of equalizing the rights of black and white males following the American Civil War. I think it took a long time to get to the point of equality, but I feel it has been reached. I've known several well-to-do and successful black men that started with nothing and absolutely had the opportunity to succeed, just as their white counter parts have a chance.

  • We have equal rights.

    Yes, the 14th Amendment achieved its goal of equalizing the rights of black and white males following the American Civil War, because it set the stage for the people to integrate. The United States could not just pass a law that required us all to like each other. With the 14th Amendment, the blacks and whites together led the way towards an integrated society. It is the fine people of the United States that brought us together.

  • No, there are still numerous examples of black males not receiving the same rights as white males.

    The Fourteenth Amendment did not achieve its goal of equalizing rights for black and white males following the American Civil War. Statistics show that black males are imprisoned at a higher rate than white males charged with the same crimes, leading me to believe that race comes into play. Recent newspaper articles highlight cases where white males are less likely to be charged with a violent crime against a black victim. Studies have also shown higher instances of voter suppression in predominantly black neighborhoods.


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