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Do all jurisdictions in the country follow the separation of church and state, as outlined in the constitution?

  • Not one No answer offered a viable basis for their argument, so here's mine.. .

    I think people get easily confused when they hear the word "Church" and assume it means the same as "Christianity". The church and state refers to the second amendment which states " Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances". It refers to a government ruled on the basis of religion (look at the middle East, Roman empire, ottoman empire, Holy Roman Catholic Church). They were responsible for huge atrocities on the basis of religion. The founding fathers of this country did not want the church, england, or anyone for that matter trying to rule them other than themselves. "In God we trust" does not violate the 1st amendment. "Everyone must be present at church on Sunday or be fined" would be a violation. However banning "In God we trust" could, as it is only a phrase with no lawful weight, be considered violating the free exercise thereof. Prayer in school is free exercise, rules forcing students to pray is a violation. Ten commandments in a courthouse is expression, referring to them as a "basis" for law is not. Swear before a court is an expression of trust. Offering no alternative to a Bible (and there are alternatives) is a violation. Case and point.. .
    Our government is not ruled by religion per the first amendment, but shows exercise of a religion through mere mention of itself also protected by the same amendment. Yes. Separation of Church and state still stands.

  • Not one No answer offered a viable basis for their argument, so here's mine.. .

    I think people get easily confused when they hear the word "Church" and assume it means the same as "Christianity". The church and state refers to the second amendment which states " Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances". It refers to a government ruled on the basis of religion (look at the middle East, Roman empire, ottoman empire, Holy Roman Catholic Church). They were responsible for huge atrocities on the basis of religion. The founding fathers of this country did not want the church, england, or anyone for that matter trying to rule them other than themselves. "In God we trust" does not violate the 1st amendment. "Everyone must be present at church on Sunday or be fined" would be a violation. However banning "In God we trust" could, as it is only a phrase with no lawful weight, be considered violating the free exercise thereof. Prayer in school is free exercise, rules forcing students to pray is a violation. Ten commandments in a courthouse is expression, referring to them as a "basis" for law is not. Swear before a court is an expression of trust. Offering no alternative to a Bible (and there are alternatives) is a violation. Case and point.. .
    Our government is not ruled by religion per the first amendment, but shows exercise of a religion through mere mention of itself also protected by the same amendment. Yes. Separation of Church and state still stands.

  • Not one answer claiming no has offered any viable basis. Here's mine.

    I think people get easily confused when they hear the word "Church" and assume it means the same as the "Christian Church". The church and state refers to the second amendment which, having neither words within it, states " Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances". It refers to a government ruled on the basis of religion (look at the middle East, Roman empire, ottoman empire, Holy Roman Catholic Church). They were responsible for huge atrocities on the basis of religion. The founding fathers of this country did not want the church, england, or anyone for that matter trying to rule them other than themselves. "In God we trust" does not violate the 1st amendment. "Everyone must be present at church on Sunday or be fined" would be a violation. However banning "In God we trust" could, as it is only a phrase with no lawful weight, be considered violating the free exercise thereof. Case and point.. .
    Our government is not ruled by religion per the first amendment, but shows exercise of a religion through mere mention of itself also protected by the same amendment. Yes. Separation of Church and state still stands.

  • Yes all jurisdictions in the country follow seperation of church and state

    If a jurisdiction does not abide by the constitutions separation of church and state, they could be infringing on the rights of people. They could be sued. It is the jurisdictions responsibility to ensure that every ones constitutional rights be protected. There can be fines and tax consequences when constitutional contingencies are ignored.

  • There are certain exceptions

    Given the size and diversity of the United States, there are certain areas that have agreed to simply ignore constitutionality in favor of what the local public deems to be right. Prayer in schools or courthouses runs rampant in certain areas especially in the bible belt, but the areas choose to ignore things.

  • Separation of Church and State an Illusion

    The separation of church and state in America is an illusion. Some places still post the Ten Commandments on public property and government sites. Just look at the coinage and currency of America--it boldly proclaims "In God We Trust." When we swear to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help us God. The Pledge of Allegiance includes a reference to God. No jurisdictions follow separation of church and state.

  • Not all juridictions follow this.

    I feel that not all jurisdictions follow the separation of church and state, as outlined in the constitution. Our nation was founded on the principal that we have freedoms of speech and religion. Many of our political leaders let religion get in the way of their agendas and these agendas pass because of strong religious beliefs making people think that is the 'right thing to do'.

  • Unfortunately, they do not.

    There are some jurisdictions in some states that try to fly in the face of the constitution by waving their religion around, or by saying that the United States was founded on religion--particularly Christianity. In my perfect America, each and every attempt to pull something like this off would be shut down immediately.


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