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Do lemonade stands encourage children to organized crime like behaviour?

Asked by: jakscrow
  • Subverting laws is cheating and illegal.

    Yes, illegal lemonade stands subvert license laws, tax laws and child labor laws, all hallmarks of organized crime. Parents call these pupils entrepreneurs and think it's harmless for the pupils to break the law. But parents get upset with politicians and/or other adult crime families doing the same. Inconsistent much?

    We shouldnt encourage organized crime like behaviour so early in life. We should teach our children to follow the rules and not let them slide on any legal business practices!

  • Subverting laws is cheating and illegal.

    Yes, illegal lemonade stands subvert license laws, tax laws and child labor laws, all hallmarks of organized crime. Parents call these pupils entrepreneurs and think it's harmless for the pupils to break the law. But parents get upset with politicians and/or other adult crime families doing the same. Inconsistent much?

    We shouldnt encourage organized crime like behaviour so early in life. We should teach our children to follow the rules and not let them slide on any legal business practices!

  • It's growing up in a world of capitalism.

    In these first world countries the pressure of capitalism grows stronger daily. When a child owns a lemonade stand, a hot chocolate stand, a candy stand, or what have you, they begin to learn about the real world. The children have to learn how to manage all of the factors that play into a lemonade stand, as well as appealing to enough customers to make the process worth while.
    They have to endure people driving by and those walking by while blatantly ignoring them, and this simply introduces them to the world of entrepreneurship and working for what they want.
    Parents encourage children to think freely and work for what they want, as success is not given to those who do not work for it.
    This teaches children life lessons; from elegant persuasion to learning about basic finances.
    Even in a world controlled by governmental affairs, any little "business" earning less than $500 doesn't even attract any legal attention.
    One can not even logically call it organized crime when the government sets guidelines like this explicitly for these situations.
    Even assuming these little "criminals" can make $50 a day, the government has no desire to step in and take $5 or $10 from them, and that is saying something in a world inundated by capitalism.
    Most children freely choose to run these little stands in order to make some money for their own benefit. It's nice to see effort and putting in time and money in order to attain what they strive for. If you don't like it, don't buy it, it is that simple. You know what they say, when life hands you lemons...

  • There seems to be some confusion about the law.

    Most states have special laws specifically for minors. For instance, as far I know every state in the US says that contracts signed with a minor are not binding. In most states lemonade stands, when run by minors, are not illegal.

    A lemonade stand would classify as a "hobby" as long as it doesn't earn more than $500 - and I have never heard of a lemonade stand doing that well - so it does not need to be licensed. It also doesn’t break child labor laws as long at the self-employed child is choosing to do the work. Child labor laws only apply when an adult is employing a child.

    A lemonade stand can’t be “organized crime” since no crime is being committed.

  • No, but...It is technically not legal without a permit...

    If some cop comes by, there is always a chance that you'll be closed down and be left to explain why to your child(ren). All you have to do is Google lemonade stands being shut down and can see this to be a fact.

    These are just a few articles I came across when I Google "police bust lemonade stands".

    Http://www.Huffingtonpost.Com/2011/07/15/georgia-police-bust-lemonade-stand_n_900230.Html

    http://www.Valleycentral.Com/news/story.Aspx?Id=1216402#.Vaqx00nn-70

    http://www.Usatoday.Com/videos/news/nation/2015/06/11/71057132/

    http://www.Forbes.Com/sites/erikkain/2011/08/03/the-inexplicable-war-on-lemonade-stands/


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