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Do Miracles from praying to Jesus really happen?

Asked by: Jikpamu
  • I’ve seen them happen!

    First, it is important to establish that none is entitled to a miracle. Miracles are rather results of God’s compassion toward us.

    Next, it’s not praying to Jesus but praying in the name of Jesus. There is authority available in the name of Jesus. I’m have personally benefitted from the authority given in the name of Jesus.

    Yes, miracles are possible and have been happening when praying in the name of Jesus.

  • I believe it.

    Last week, a friend of mine lost his inhaler. He has stage three COPD. He always puts it in a side pocket in his backpack, when he's finished using it. One day, it turned up missing. We both looked for it. He lost it at a Wendy's btw. We never found it. He even cleaned out his backpack. It was just gone. He could die without that inhaler. I said a prayer that night. The next morning, he found it, right where it was supposed be. This really happened. I'm not making it up. It really freaked me out, at first. But then I thanked God for answering my prayer. I'm calling it a miracle. You can call it whatever you want.

  • Prayer to Jesus and the Father REALLY works!!!

    How Jesus Provides for His servants:

    Yesterday, 6/25/2014, I had a very busy day consumed with activities at home. My dog, Macala, had vomited up her dog food in the morning. I would have stepped in it when I got off the couch but my wife discovered it and cleaned it up.

    Macala again vomited up some of her dog food when I fed her in the afternoon (I cleaned it up this time). I knew what was wrong at that point: she needed to eat some grass but the only grass is about a block away and across a busy street.

    I have to admit that I "dislike" going outside and prefer to spend my time in my home posting all things Jesus and the Bible online at sites like Facebook, Ebay, and Debate.Org : )

    I prayed to Jesus to help Macala. When my wife came home she went out on our porch/patio and discovered that one of our potted plants outside had grass growing in it. We did not plant the grass. She immediately gave some of the grass to Macala in her dish. Macala happily ate it and immediately got a smile on her face (Macala is a small Bichon-Frise).

    Jesus provides and prayer to Him and the Father REALLY works!!! God Bless everyone and have a great day : )

    Update 6/26/2014: Macala our dog “cacked” again this morning but did not throw up so I just gave her some more grass which is what it is there for and she happily ate it : )

    The Picture is of the potted plant in question with the miraculous grass growing in it.

  • Prayer is a powerful plead to God, he may choose to do what he wishes.

    Prayer is asking God to do something, and since God is generous, he loves to answer us. But sometimes he must refuse if it is not best for us, just like a parent would refuse to give their child a coke at 10 p.M. He is not a magic box. But yes, God often does answer us, and there are many stories of miracles coming from prayer/

  • Yes it does.

    Austin has been in a large drought for the past five years. About three months ago, we were about to move into major water restrictions. So, over 100 pastors in the Austin area got together and prayed for God to send rain. It rained every day for a week afterwords. And there are countless other stories of incredible mericles all around the world.

  • Yes and no.

    Prayer can work but not in the way you think.
    Placebo effect: A placebo is a medication that has no medicinal ingredients used to help with symptoms. If a doctor you respected gave you a sugar pill but told you it was powerful sleep aid, taking it may trick your mind into believing that it works causing you to fall asleep. Sometimes prayer can have the same effect. If you pray that your headache will go away, you may trick your brain into thinking that your prayer is working and you headache may go away. By no means would this work on things that your brain can not control like a broken leg or cancer. It may help with the pain but have no effect to heal the leg or to remove the cancer.
    Change of observation: We only tend to see things we are looking for. If I took a large bowl of m&ms in front of you and asked you to find the one blue m&m. You may find it but fail to notice that most of them are brown, or the dozen gold colored ones. If you prayed to find the love of your life, you may pay more attention to other peoples reactions.
    Example: You just prayed to find Mr. Or Mrs. Right and took a walk, odds are you may look closer at other people. If you notice someone attractive, you may smile at them without intending to. They may smile back in response. Without realizing it, you both have started to flirt and this could lead to a chain of events that would not have happened had you not convinced yourself that you would find someone.
    There may be more reasons but those two are just an example. Just because a prayer may be answered does not mean that there was a supernatural being involved.

  • Sure, pray cancer away.

    There is no such thing as a miracle.
    Prayers don't do anything.
    If you think they do, pray for your god to change my mind.
    Which god do we pray to? There are over 700 gods in human history, and Christianity is one of the newest religions in the world.
    Think and USA common sense.

  • No. And here's why?

    The miracles recorded in the Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), including the book of Acts, do not happen today. No one today born blind receives sight, no one deaf can suddenly now hear, no one dead has come to life. These are real miracles that do not happen today.

  • Miracles don't happen

    Miracles and luck are two separate things. With that in mind, luck is when things happen to go your way and they were unplanned. This is essentially a coincidence in your favor. An example would be getting 50 dollars on the ground. You didn't plan for it to be there, but it was and any amount of money is in your favor. A miracle is kind of like luck, except it is more like "It's a Christmas miracle"(To give context, let's say that a family had their daughter come home and they had to setup an entire party in a day.) A miracle in that sense is plausible, as nothing that defied science happened. A miracle here is "OMG SHE CAME BACK TO LIFE ITS A MIRACLE PRAISE GOD!" That is quite ridiculous and assumes an otherworldly being intervened and let the lady live.

  • It's the Barnum/Forer Effect:

    The human mind seeks positive reinforcement for existing concepts:
    You pray to Jesus and it does not happen, you will most likely forget about it ( negative incidents get swept under the mental rug ).
    You pray to Jesus and it happens, and you gloat about it as your belief is positively reinforced, thus you will remember it, possibly all your life if it was big.
    So if a person has 75% misses from prayers but 25% hits, the hits will likely be the only ones remembered and the person would most likely boast that Jesus always answers my prayers, even though 75% of them failed.
    It's how humans continually delude themselves.
    This is how psychics con people, they only need to average 25% hits and their victims will consider them as 100% accurate.

  • No, of course prayer doesn't create miracles, regardless of what entity one prays to.

    There hasn't been a recorded "miracle" since the dawn of the industrial revolution.

    I'm sure someone will angrily respond that I'm wrong, but I'm not. Miracles don't exist, or are, at best, the product of coincidence.

    I could make up some story like Jikpamu, recounting some coincidence which convinced me miracles are real, but that would be dishonest, because I realize the machinations of physics and reality cannot be altered on the whim of a capricious deity.

    Why does his prayer about a dog get answered, but the prayers of starving children go unheard?

    Jikpamu's story illustrates the ego-centrism of religious zealots who believe their creator is so focused on their lives, and their piety, when really, no entity cares.

    This is just Jikpamu's way of reinforcing his own religious fervor, by defining coincidence as an answered prayer.

  • Prayer doesn't work.

    By this end of this year some 7 million children will have died. That's almost 600,000 a month, Which is about 145,000 a week, More than 20,000 a day, Just under 900 an hour, Closing out to about 14 every minute. This means by the time I compose this statement, quite a few children will have died in between when I start and submit it. These children will have no doubt prayed themselves, and their parents begged and pleaded for their loved ones to be spared. However, no relief will come for these families. To think that prayer works, in all of the situations that would have simply been prevented if prayer was legitimate is not only a violation of common sense, but a violation of humanity. By simply offering well wishes and thoughts when we could be preventing a life from being lost isn't necessarily wrong. But insisting that it does work, and forcing the idea upon others who truly need help and only giving them prayer as a substitute is immoral, (sometimes to the point of criminal). So, as for the 98 children and their families who are no longer together as I submit this statement, among many other factors, we can also thank those who would simply *pray* for something to change instead of physically taking initiative to make a difference.

  • No, of course prayer doesn't create miracles, regardless of what entity one prays to.

    There hasn't been a recorded "miracle" since the dawn of the industrial revolution.

    I'm sure someone will angrily respond that I'm wrong, but I'm not. Miracles don't exist, or are, at best, the product of coincidence.

    I could make up some story like Jikpamu, recounting some coincidence which convinced me miracles are real, but that would be dishonest, because I realize the machinations of physics and reality cannot be altered on the whim of a capricious deity.

    Why does his prayer about a dog get answered, but the prayers of starving children go unheard?

    Jikpamu's story illustrates the ego-centrism of religious zealots who believe their creator is so focused on their lives, and their piety, when really, no entity cares.

    This is just Jikpamu's way of reinforcing his own religious fervor, by defining coincidence as an answered prayer.

  • Why should they?

    As David Hume said; any miracle must suspend the laws of known physical laws in your favor alone. I agree, and it is indeed a bit arrogant on an individual level and anthropocentric on a cosmic scale to think that an entity beyond the restrictions of natural laws would really listen to a simple little organism. Of course, there might be such an entity focusing mainly on humans, but then its one hell of a selective entity that needs to get its priorities straight.

  • No and No

    I've read so many debates and the only arguments I've seen that made sense and that are logical are the ones that say prayers do not work. They (being prayers) cannot fix things. Every problem or hardship mankind has ever endured was fixed by noneother than man. So, no: prayers cannot be answered and miracles do not happen...

  • Let's look at studies.

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2009/05/15/study-concludes-intercessory-prayer-doesnt-work-christians-twist-the-results/
    It looks like it does not work. Can prayer have a placebo effect? Maybe. Does prayer actually work? Do prayers get answered? No and no. I still find it hilarious that people try and say that it does work, and they never provide and good evidence for their claims.


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