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Do people worry too much about being politically correct?

  • Creating More Walls Than Bridges

    There are alot of people that don't fully know what it means to be politically correct. The idea "used" to be noble, and proper. Now it has become a soap box for people to bust the chops of others who don't share their opinion. People are being driven further away from each other because we simply don't want to risk being involved with them anymore. Being involved means that labels will be attached to that person if they say the wrong things, or do the wrong thing. The idea behind political correctness and how it started is not the same as what it is today in most ways. People need to stop being offended if someone else thinks differently than them.

  • Creating More Walls Than Bridges

    There are alot of people that don't fully know what it means to be politically correct. The idea "used" to be noble, and proper. Now it has become a soap box for people to bust the chops of others who don't share their opinion. People are being driven further away from each other because we simply don't want to risk being involved with them anymore. Being involved means that labels will be attached to that person if they say the wrong things, or do the wrong thing. The idea behind political correctness and how it started is not the same as what it is today in most ways. People need to stop being offended if someone else thinks differently than them.

  • It's not worth your time being politically correct.

    Being a college student, I have seen the problems with people trying to be politically correct. In fact I have noticed people blindly accepting the politically correct ideology without ever questioning it. I remember the moment I wished a friend a Merry Christmas, some other random student barged into our conversation and told me how some people don't celebrate Christmas like him, yet I saw him at a Christmas party a week later.

    Political correctness masks the truth with a lie or a rather inaccurate depiction with little to no element of truth. Fat people want to be called pleasantly plumped, but if that's the case, is the South Pole Refreshingly chilly, or is lava pleasantly warm? The answer is simple, no. One teacher I had a class with back in high school used to always tell things as the were and one quote I remember him saying was "The truth hurts, but lies kill".
    Not only this, but political correctness also hides issues within society as opposed to solving them. Calling American Indians, Native Americans does not change the fact that teams still have Indian chiefs as logos, like the Washington Redskins, Cleveland Indians or the Chicago Blackhawks. Also calling blacks, African Americans assumes that all blacks came from Africa, in which I have only met a few that are from there and I have a friend from Zimbabwe who is white and can pass herself off as African American ( which was intended for blacks mainly), thus proving political correctness not to be so truthful to its meaning.

  • The country is losing it's fundamental philosophy by the selfish who drive their own agenda.

    If we as a society could just understand that there will never be a "utopia" for everyone to live in harmony and without adversity, we could actually get beyond a majority of the problems we face today and start making positive changes. Like a rebellious child who hears the word no and continues their bad behavior, there are those who will continually perpetuate all of those things which counter the ideology of the societal norms to be provocative and non-conforming. There are so many different kinds of people on this planet, that it is impossible to make everything we do, say, think, etc., not impact someone in any kind of way. Teach children manners, respect, humility and integrity and they will be of sound character...Then, a lot of these issues will not be issues. When people have low self-esteem, confidence and a persecution complex...Everything is offensive and inflammatory.

    We will never get rid of prejudice or hate in the world. We can't all be one color or all the same height or same socioeconomic status...It doesn't work, it can't work. Someone, somewhere will find something else to single out and make anti-whatever it is.

  • We worry too much

    In America today we worry too much about things. Now, I'm not a racist or homophobe. I was accused of being racist the other day because I didn't like Oprah, and I thought that was rather strange. Just because I don't like Oprah or our current president doesn't make me a racist. And just because I don't agree with certain lifestyles doesn't mean I hate all people, because I don't. I don't have to like all entertainers, and I don't have to like our president's policies. It's what makes this country special that we have differences of opinions. I think we've gotten to the point that we want everyone's opinions to be the same about the same issues and topics, which is really impossible to do. But it creates a vacuum socially and politically. Young people sometimes vote without researching candidates. I never vote for people unless I know who they are and what they stand for, not just the party but who is the person? There are some issues we should all agree with. Racism and sexism we should all stay away from, but we need to understand what these things are before we go around accusing people of them. Equality is important but shoving our opinions down each other's throats in the name of political correctness has started to create a generation of people who cry over spilled milk.

  • Way too liberal

    First I thought it was just particular states that were out of control with the political correctness, excessive lawsuits, everyone blaming everyone else but themselves for their problems...Etc etc but it's the U.S.!!!!! It's horrible. The politicians and media do not care about anything but power and money. This country is going to fold in on itself and be another third world country. Time to flee farther north

  • We shouldn't need to care about what others think.

    If we worry about how people may or may not react to what we say, then we'll drive ourselves insane. I'm not going to tiptoe around a word or topic just because it's mean or because it's hard to discuss. We need to be more assertive of ourselves and what we want to say. Socially, we are a nation full of cowards and whiny wimps. My philosophy is simple: say what I think, and say what I feel. If the world decides to be offended and respond "Oh my gosh, do you have any idea how many people you're offending?!" I simply say "No. Even if I did, I couldn't possibly care any less. Would you rather me lie to preserve your self-esteem?" "Yes, I'd appreciate that," "You're an idiot."

  • Yes without a doubt.

    The problem is, these days, producers seem to think that if one presenter is a white heterosexual male, the other should be a black homosexual muslim. It's ludicrous that my son can't say "Merry Christmas" without being asked to leave the classroom and think about why that may be offensive to some people. I'm an atheist but I still use the word "Christmas". Despite what some religious people may like to think, Christmas is celebrated by everyone regardless of whether they're Christians or not. If someone tells me I've offended their religion, I say: "I'm still waiting to hear your point". People can write (and draw about) what ever they want as far as I am concerned. The Holocaust has been taken out of the curriculum where I live due to it possible offending muslims who deny the holocaust. That's not their religion, that's evil. If you ask me, anyone who denies these events took place is almost as bad as the evil tyrants that did them. It is out of fear that they may be victim of some kind of terrorist attack that people don't insult Muslims. On a small scale, the narrator on a program named Come Dine With Me always insults and makes sarcastic, light hearted, comments about the contestants. However, every single time there is a muslim on this program, he doesn't to it to them. What also really really grates me is the contradictory laws and standards regarding racism and political correctness. If a white person is shot by a black policeman, oh that's terrible but no one hears about it. If a black person is shot by a whit person it's front page news (in the UK although it took place in the USA) for the next fortnight! There's riots and there's huge uproar. I'm not necessarily saying that it's okay for the black person to have been shot by this policeman by why don't we hear about it when it's the other way around?

  • Have your own beliefs.

    Too many believe what ever they are told to believe. They would rather lie then hurt someone's feelings. We should not be a country based on hypocrisy. Everyone has a right to their beliefs. Beliefs do not and should not be based on what politicians or anyone else says. No one has a right to force their beliefs on someone else. Just because you do not agree with something does not mean you are wrong. You should not go out and attack someone for disagreeing with you. Stop ignoring the Bill of Rights.

  • America has become too politically correct

    We all need to grow up. Merry Christmas should not hurt anyone's feelings, but some how, it does. Christmas is a holiday and if you are Jewish, you can say Happy Hanukah or what ever you worship, you can say that too. But some how, people get really offended when I say Merry Christmas. In return, they say, Happy holidays is more PC.

  • The harms of not being politically correct are much greater than the effort expended on being aware, or politically correct.

    Being politically correct does not take an extremely large toll on an individual. In fact, the majority of people actually do act politely in the status quo about other cultures. However, if someone hears something that is not politically correct which could potentially be EXTREMELY offensive, the negative impact on them is severe. The ever-so-slight inconvenience of being politically correct can prevent someone from being deeply, emotionally, and systematically oppressed. It is necessary to realize conversations of sensitive subjects are still going to happen, but they will be at a degree where they are tolerant, rather than ignorant.

  • The harms of not being politically correct are much greater than the effort expended on being aware, or politically correct.

    Being politically correct does not take an extremely large toll on an individual. In fact, the majority of people actually do act politely in the status quo about other cultures. However, if someone hears something that is not politically correct which could potentially be EXTREMELY offensive, the negative impact on them is severe. The ever-so-slight inconvenience of being politically correct can prevent someone from being deeply, emotionally, and systematically oppressed. It is necessary to realize conversations of sensitive subjects are still going to happen, but they will be at a degree where they are tolerant, rather than ignorant.

  • I believe it is better to be overly aware of political correctness than not aware at all.

    I believe the few times that political correctness has been overdone are much less harmful than the millions of times it has not been used at all.

    Posted by: Bratzky
  • Being politically correct is part of showing respect for society and the differences between people.

    Everyone has been told that they're being "too politically correct", but they're often just being polite. While in mixed company, it's best not to possibly offend or alienate other people. Not insulting others due to their race, sexuality or heritage is important. A crass joke is occasionally acceptable, but it's possible to make jokes without being derogatory.

    Posted by: R4yCher
  • Political correctness, as such, does not require much effort, and shapes our thought and culture in a constructive direction, although it's only a first step.

    Political correctness can be understood simply as an application of the idea of courtesy, and as such, seems worth the effort it requires. After all, would we say that most people worry too much about being courteous? Hardly, because our lives work better when we treat each other with respect. Careful use of language isn't enough, by itself, to achieve equality, and an ongoing respect for diversity in our multicultural society. Changes in public policy, in media, and in our lifestyles are needed to make men and women and people of different ethnic backgrounds, religions, and other demographic distinctions more equal. But language shapes the way we look at the world, and is a good everyday step toward a more inclusive community. Policing language can admittedly become obsessive and counterproductive, if it isn't accompanied by humor, goodwill, and a sense of perspective. However, none of these negate the basic value of the PC concept.

    Posted by: M4I4cFeIine
  • It seems to me that there are far too few people thinking about being politically correct.

    When I hear people like Rush Limbaugh and other conservative talk radio hosts and others, and when I hear those who agree with them, I begin to think that civil discourse is dead in this nation. There is such hostility spouted from the mouths of these people who only want to get people upset enough to continue listening until the next commercial. I wish that people were more civil with each other. There is frankly a place for political correctness; it is not so much believing in a certain thing but at least being kind in one's speech no matter what a person believes in. There is no room for bad-mouthing people on the basis of race, religious tradition, color, sex, orientation, disability, or anything else except one's conduct. It is frankly cruel, lacking in compassion, rude, and in poor taste to do so.

    Posted by: SportyHart
  • I do not agree that people worry excessively about being politically correct because we are sliding back into acceptance of various types of off-color humor.

    I think that President Obama's recent use of the phrase "whose ass to kick" is representative of a trend in language that is making our society less polite in all areas. While part of me wants to think that our acceptance of racial jokes and assorted "politically incorrect" language is evidence that our society is beyond caring about race, I think that our recent acceptance of crudeness is more a representation of the lowering of language standards across all areas of society.

    Posted by: Shim2free
  • Political correctness is an important part of our society.

    Political correctness is a measure of the equality in our society. Political correctness is a sign of the recognition of the trials of minorities and helps us understand their plight so that we may be more empathetic to their situation. Political correctness leads the way to societal change. It is important to understand others positions, which helps us change our priorities.

    Posted by: R43Shep
  • The majority of people don't worry about being politically correct as they continue to believe perpetuated stereotypes.

    Most people would understand that the "N" word is offensive, but making a joke about immigration or portraying Muslims as terrorists might get a laugh out of a good few people. Most people don't know, and don't care that certain things are racist, sexist or homophobic, or just generally politically incorrect. Part of the irony in art and shock humor in TV shows and movies (that often make fun of racism) are often taken literally by people of low intelligence, and that creates even more problems.

    Posted by: R053Neddy

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