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  • Of Course They Do.

    School is a place where you are put into categories, they vary from large labels like (Popular/ Unpopular/ Loner) smaller more defined ones like (Nerds/Emos/Goths/Jocks/Rejects).

    If you don't fit into a category, you go to the Reject one automatically, and then these labels force you into a social hierarchy. Jocks and Cheerleaders at the top, running the school with the world in their hand, while Nerds, Loners and Rejects end up at the bottom, and are often looked down upon.

    School is based around being Popular or Un-Popular. This is the main category, and then it branches of into lots of little groups or clicks. These clicks are ranked in order of popularity and then, a social hierarchy is formed.

  • Yes they do.

    Schools, even at the youngest of ages encourage the social hierarchy. Children are taught that their place is below that of their teachers and that the teachers position is below that of the principal. The social hierarchy goes beyond that as people with influential parents are more likely to get away with not following the rules compared to someone of a less social stature. This hierarchy, although not addressed directly, is taught through example from the time that children enter school.

  • Yes, this issue is inevitable in schools.

    Social hierarchy is inevitable in schools. Just like the real world, classmates find themselves forming groups with people who are like them. It is natural for most people to feel more comfortable with someone who shares the same lifestyle. While I was in school, school staff and faculty never discouraged certain students from hanging out with each other.

  • Yes, I think some do

    The social hierarchy is something that is very difficult to avoid, especially when dealing with a large group of people in an enclosed area, much like schools. Some schools try very hard to make sure everyone is on equal footing, but some schools don't. That unequal treatment of students and teachers is what encourages the social hierarchy.

  • Schools Steer Clear of Hierarchy

    Schools tend to steer clear of Hierarchy these days. There is more and more controversy regarding this issue now than ever before. I figure that the thoughts on the issue is that it should most likely be better left to the individual and family preference than to an educational area.

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  • Yes, Because People Often Repeat What They Were Shown

    Some teachers try to be nicer to the kids considered the most dominant to compromise for their own uncoolness in childhood and to feel 'popular' even when they know the kid is a melodramatic bully to other children in their peer group. Popular isn't even the right word, it's the emotionally abusive, really aggressive, obnoxious children with bad language and lots of makeup who hang around with other attention seeking, nasty children like a pack of animals in the higher ability classes who tend to be deemed 'popular'. But in the real world outside of compulsory education where everyone's on a level playing field, those people get rejected. When and if they hit University and try to be a bully there, they then in turn become the reject. No-one likes a nasty, horrible adult and that pack-animal mentality is deemed unacceptable in the workplace and you can report them until they lose their job. In multicultural Schools things tend to be better I think, not the quality of education necessarily but the bullying/racism/homophobia thing definitely from my experiences at least. All the different races tend to cluster together in multicultural Schools and any bullying is usually very superficial but in all white Schools things can be extremely petty/emotionally abusive, occasionally escalating into physical violence. Also the poorer the area of the School, the worse and nastier the behaviour of the students who attend it. Went to five different Schools. I think culture comes into it largely too. From my experience of five Schools within the UK, the British born kids, regardless of race were by far the nastiest, meanest, melodramatic and sadistic.

  • It is clearer in younger class grouping

    Although it does occur in every year, the older the tier becomes, the most hazy the line becomes and people begin to pretend there is not a divide. In younger tiers, there is a clear divide with "the popular" children at the top simply because they are most boisterous and more physically tuned compared to those who are not, and those ones a clearly marked by their actions, friendships and physical forms.

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  • It just happens

    No matter how the schools try to make an even experience for everyone, the social hierarchy wins. There will always be one. This issue is more prominent in debates nowadays, but a hierarchy happens on its own, the schools don't encourage people to sit by their friends, they just do naturally.

  • It is natural

    Everyone falls into a level of class. Some are nerdier, some are cooler. There is no way around not having a social hierarchy. When people interact with other groups, everyone is categorized. I like Bessy more than John, and so on. It is a way of life. There is no other route. Even in early civilization. They had a social hierarchy. It lays out basic standards that you have to meet to be in another caste.

  • It isn't the schools, it's just nature

    Given the opportunity to interact as peer groups, pre-schoolers, elementary students, middle school, HS and college/university-age persons will sort out, by personal interaction, a dominance hierarchy. This is a natural part of developing a social hierarchy. Teachers (schools) may try to intervene but I doubt they a significant impact.


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