• Yes, the obese are discriminated against.

    The obese face discrimination from several directions in society, some of this discrimination is obvious and some is more subtle. My guess is that it is illegal to discriminate against an obese person who is seeking a job, nevertheless it can be done by finding other reasons to disqualify the job candidate, if indeed a reason is even needed. But I am more interested the subtle ways. Recently, Governor Chris Christie was accused of using his political clout to block access to a bridge. A political cartoonist depicted this event by showing a hugely exaggerated Chris Christie body actually physically blocking the bridge. To me, this was discrimination, because it was using a cruel way of illustrating the issue by focusing on his weight, which was not the issue at all.

  • Yes, they face discrimination daily.

    Of all the groups who support the assorted causes in this country, there are none who stand up for the rights of obese people. Obese people face daily discrimination. The term "obese" is a label that is discriminatory and offends just as much as a racial slur offends a minority. Obese people face discrimination in hiring, air travel accommodations, and restaurants every day, with no one speaking up in their behalf.

  • Yes, but sometimes it's warranted.

    The obese do but should not face discrimination in terms of how we look at them and relate to them as worthy people. However, when it comes to taking over more than one seat on a plane or other public venue, then that is not discrimination but pure common sense to have them pay for two so another person is not inconvenienced.

  • No, they are burden to society and expect others to be happy for it.

    There is no such thing as discrimination against an obese person, because obesity is a choice. Discrimination implies treating someone differently for gender, race, culture or religious upbringing.
    Besides, obese people cost higher taxpayer dollars in health care, make people uncomfortable on airplanes and in grocery store aisles, cause greater wear and tear on chairs and benches (which I have seen collapse under unnatural amounts of weight), and are causing severe back problems for firemen, nurses, and other health care professionals, among many other things that are too numerous to list!
    Why should the people who aren't gluttonous cater to those who are?

  • Obesity is quickly taking a backseat to height bigotry

    Since most statistics have obesity rates in americans as high as 60% by 2030 i think its much more common for men of short stature to be discriminated much more commonly.Documentaries have even revealed this in the past.Short men must work harder, are often not even hired because businesses are biased to tall men,and women are incredibly superficial and brutal when it comes to short men and are automatically rejected reguardless of merit.With obesity its becoming so common its almost looked at as acceptable people arent willing to run or join a gym/martial art to lose weight so they stay that way and the % increases.

  • It's a matter of practicality.

    No, the obese do not face discrimination, because the vast majority of people are very nice to and sympathetic towards the obese. There are some practical considerations. For example, if an amusement park ride is build for someone who is 200 pounds, a 300 pound person would be unsafe to ride the ride. That is not discrimination, it is practicality.

  • No, the obese do not face discrimination.

    I do not think the obese face any more discrimination than any other group of people who partake in practices that can be a problem to others. Smokers for instance are not allowed to smoke in public. The obese also have limitation place upon them because of their decision to not take care of the issue of their weight. If an obese person has to pay more for a plane ticket, then it is a just rule and not discrimination.

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