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Do you believe DDT pesticide usage reduced the quality of life of modern humans in the 1950s and 1960s?

  • Yes, DDT pesticide usage reduced the quality of life of modern humans in the 1950s and 1960s

    Because people were exposed to it without their knowledge, DDT pesticide usage reduced the quality of life of modern humans in the 1950s and 1960s. It maybe a contributor to various birth defects and illnesses amongst Americans, which definitely changed their lives. DDT should not have been tested in this way on our citizens.

  • The First to Kill Bedbugs

    Frank Court's book, Angela's Ashes, describes growing up extremely poor in Ireland. One thing he mentioned is having bed bugs and how awful those were. Finally, DDT came out and it killed the bed bugs and made life in poverty just a little more bearable. That said, DDT also almost destroyed Bald Eagles and it probably wouldn't do much with today's super bed bugs. But back in the early days of its usage, it made a positive difference.

  • No, I don't think DDT pesticide usage reduced the quality of life of modern humans in the 1950's and 1960's.

    Overall the Government quickly learned of the dangers of DDT and stopped using it before it caused real harm in humans, I think while it may have been unpleasant I think that it didn't really have a notable decrease in the quality of life, I think there were some benefits from it since it killed the insects carrying the West Nile Virus.

  • It made us safer.

    No, I do not believe that the DDT pesticide usage reduced the quality of life of modern humans in the 1950s and 1960s, because DDT was very helpful in preventing malaria deaths. The scientific claims that led to the prevention of DDT use were shaky at best. People in Africa die now because we cannot use DDT.


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