Do you believe in voluntarism's doctrine of Equal Liberty?

  • I do agree

    Liberty and justice for all so it says in the national anthem, so it stands to reason that liberty should not be different for different people but equal regardless of where you are from or what your station in life happens to be.So my fellow humans please keep thinking equal.

  • Voluntarism's doctrine of equal liberty is sound.

    Voluntarism is idealistic. This form of existence will never become popular because men are greedy. However, if voluntarism were possible at its core, then the equal liberty doctrine that follows is believable. Because everyone only acts in ways that they have agreed to act, they are all equally free to act or not act. Once the agreement is made, the assumption is that the responsibilities will be fulfilled just as the person volunteered to do them.

  • It is a human right.

    Yes, I believe in voluntarism's doctrine of Equal Liberty, because it is very respectful of human rights to allow people to make their own choices, including freedom of association. To have voluntarism is to afford each citizen the equal liberty to decide what they want with their life. This makes people happy and is a good way to live life.

  • Yes, I absolutely do.

    While I am not a big fan of voluntarism and think that it is a very egotistical approach to humanity's place in the cosmos, I do agree with the doctrine of Equal Liberty. I think, upon birth, this is a right all people should be afforded no matter who they are.

  • No: I Do Not Believe In Voluntarism's Doctrine Of Equal Liberty

    On it's face, there seems to be a lot to like about this doctrine, which basically says, do what thou, lest it harm none. The problem is that we are now in an age of so-called advanced societies where the unintended consequences of powerful, often polluting technologies have the capacity to destabilize communities, ecosystems, or even the entire planet. The Doctrine of Equal Liberty could only lead to a healthy world if it also incorporated the Precautionary Principle. On its own, it is incomplete, and is no true safeguard for liberty or happiness.

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