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Do you think it's time for Fannie and Freddie to go?

  • Yes, Fannie and Freddie are large corporations with no interest in an individual's success.

    Yes, Fannie and Freddie have been giving loans to people who should never have received loans. They did not take the time to properly vet the applicants for loans, and as a result, people were not able to repay those loans. Foreclosures and short sales resulted, driving down the value of homes. People were evicted for failure to pay back those loans, increasing homelessness throughout the country. The blame for a lot of societal woes falls squarely on their shoulders.

  • Yes It Is

    I believe it is time from Fannie and Freddie to go. I believe the government was wrong for bailing banks out and trying to quickly solve the mortgage crisis. Taxpayers should not have had to foot the bill for the indiscretion of bankers nor for their greed. If these companies can't stand on their own, then they should be allowed to fail.

  • Fannie And Freddie are outdated.

    Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac should have been allowed to fail. Yes, there would have been economic repercussions throughout the country that effected everyone. On the other hand, bankers would have learned that there are repercussions to irresponsible action in the name of greed. Americans would have made it through, and the issues would probably have been history by now. Instead, Freddie and Fannie continue to deal in fraudulent ways in the name of profit.

  • Fannie and Freddie

    I personally think that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were not the main problem in the housing collapse crisis. The largest part of the problem was the removal of the Glass-Stegall act that regulated the banking and insurance industries from becoming too intertwined. It is not a good idea to allow the same corporation to underwrite a loan and insure it, because it creates a single point of failure. There also need to be additional regulations that prevent the banks from chopping up thousands of loans, mixing them together, and repackaging them as a security with an unverifiable risk profile.

  • It is not time for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to go, but it is time for Glass-Stegall to come back.

    Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were not the main problem in the housing collapse crisis. The largest part of the problem was the removal of the Glass-Stegall act that regulated the banking and insurance industries from becoming too intertwined. It is not a good idea to allow the same corporation to underwrite a loan and insure it, because it creates a single point of failure. There also need to be additional regulations that prevent the banks from chopping up thousands of loans, mixing them together, and repackaging them as a security with an unverifiable risk profile.


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